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How early is too early for Christmas?

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  • AndreaTamiraAndreaTamira Member, Premium Posts: 108 Member Member, Premium Posts: 108 Member
    Well, Advent kinda starts the season. So, 29th November this year.

    I refuse to do anything that is related to Christmas before that point.

    But, if you like to start earlier, knock yourself out. Have fun, there isn't enough of that around as is.

    Eating my own words, here. There is a small German christmas market in my city in New Zealand next Saturday and I really want to go. ( because I miss my Christmas Markets, and also it's kinda funny in a sad way I will go to one half around the globe while all the ones in Germany are cancelled.)

    So, guess the Christmas season is gonna start a day early for me.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,900 Member Member Posts: 5,900 Member
    You made me wonder what is going on with the Christkindlmarket that we normally have in Chicago (since I knew it wouldn't be going on in any real sense this year). I checked and there's a virtual version (started on Nov 1, continuing through the end of Dec). Mainly just to encourage people to order from their usual vendors (which I will, now I am aware of it), but also with some virtual activities for kids.
  • brianpperkins131brianpperkins131 Member Posts: 70 Member Member Posts: 70 Member
    X-mas starts Dec 24th. Hold a truce in the Flandrien farmland.
  • corinasue1143corinasue1143 Member Posts: 4,135 Member Member Posts: 4,135 Member
    Christmas lights are starting here today! Perfect timing. Just when corona numbers are going up, and lockdowns are getting tougher. We have 4 big drive-thru light displays that are an easy drive from me. The one about 2 miles away usually takes me about 3 nights to get all the way through. I haven’t been to The farthest one (20 miles?) in years, but I probably will this year.
    I know they will really lift my spirits! And I bet they will be even busier this year than ever!
    Christmas may be very different this year, but it can still be good!
  • b120in2021b120in2021 Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    I LOVE Christmas. Anything before the day after Thanksgiving is too early.

    Also -- is Die Hard a Christmas movie?
  • GummiMundiGummiMundi Member Posts: 233 Member Member Posts: 233 Member
    b120in2021 wrote: »
    I LOVE Christmas. Anything before the day after Thanksgiving is too early.

    Also -- is Die Hard a Christmas movie?

    It's not A Christmas movie, it's THE Christmas movie! B)
  • MarziPanda95MarziPanda95 Member Posts: 1,297 Member Member Posts: 1,297 Member
    I believe there are only two countries in the world that have thanksgiving, so it irks me when people judge others for starting Christmas before thanksgiving (nobody in this thread, just in general!). Like, why should I wait until after some holiday that some other country celebrates?

    For me, as soon as it's the second half of November, Christmas music is fair game. Christmas jumpers are fair game from December 1st. But we don't put up decorations until December 11th in my family. My granny's birthday was December 10th, and she always insisted that no decorations could go up until the next day. And even though she died six years ago, it's a tradition for us, to remember her by.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,900 Member Member Posts: 5,900 Member
    I've never heard anyone judge people in other countries for not waiting until US Thanksgiving is over. Mostly it's about the fact that US stores play Christmas carols and have all the Christmas stuff out immediately after Halloween.

    Interestingly, I've now heard a huge amount of people--both those I know and people on podcasts--saying that normally they hate Christmas stuff starting pre-Thanksgiving (again, we are talking about in the US), but because of 2020 being so awful, everyone gets a pass. (I feel the same way, and am thinking about putting up some stuff tomorrow, although I am not getting the tree until after Thanksgiving--not sure when yet.)
  • glassyoglassyo Member Posts: 4,883 Member Member Posts: 4,883 Member
    I always feel bad for Thanksgiving. Whenever I'd walk through Target during the holidays, they went straight from Halloween to Christmas, leaving maybe one end cap for Thanksgiving stuff.

    It deserves more!
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,885 Member Member Posts: 1,885 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    I always feel bad for Thanksgiving. Whenever I'd walk through Target during the holidays, they went straight from Halloween to Christmas, leaving maybe one end cap for Thanksgiving stuff.

    It deserves more!

    I wish we in the US would switch to a mid-October Thanksgiving like our Canadian neighbors. The weather would be better, and we'd have a longer gap to Christmas.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,900 Member Member Posts: 5,900 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    I always feel bad for Thanksgiving. Whenever I'd walk through Target during the holidays, they went straight from Halloween to Christmas, leaving maybe one end cap for Thanksgiving stuff.

    It deserves more!

    I wish we in the US would switch to a mid-October Thanksgiving like our Canadian neighbors. The weather would be better, and we'd have a longer gap to Christmas.

    I've wanted to do a Thanksgiving more like the first Thanksgiving (meaning the one with Pilgrims and American Indians in 1623, I know there were "thanksgiving" type events before and that it was not a yearly holiday until much later) for ages, as I thought it would be fun and different to try to make dishes with that constraint. No one else thought that was a good idea (although my sister thought it was interesting), and so I never did, but this year since it will be tiny, we are doing it (but not being strict in some respects, for example, I don't have flint corn, so we are using sweet corn). Main dish is venison. Because of this I've been researching what was available, and realized that since it was in October, different types of fresh produce would have been available than can actually be harvested in November. October makes more sense in general if one is in a colder climate anyway.

    I found this interesting: "From the time of the Founding Fathers until the time of Lincoln, the date of observance varied from state to state. The final Thursday in November had become the customary date in most U.S. states by the beginning of the 19th century, coinciding with, and eventually superseding the holiday of Evacuation Day (commemorating the day the British exited the United States after the Revolutionary War)."

    I did know this: "Modern Thanksgiving was proclaimed for all states in 1863 by Abraham Lincoln. Influenced by Sarah Josepha Hale, who wrote letters to politicians for approximately 40 years advocating an official holiday, Lincoln set national Thanksgiving by proclamation for the final Thursday in November, explicitly in celebration of the bounties that had continued to fall on the Union and for the military successes in the war. Because of the ongoing Civil War, a nationwide Thanksgiving celebration was not realized until Reconstruction was completed in the 1870s."
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 1,885 Member Member Posts: 1,885 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    I always feel bad for Thanksgiving. Whenever I'd walk through Target during the holidays, they went straight from Halloween to Christmas, leaving maybe one end cap for Thanksgiving stuff.

    It deserves more!

    I wish we in the US would switch to a mid-October Thanksgiving like our Canadian neighbors. The weather would be better, and we'd have a longer gap to Christmas.

    I've wanted to do a Thanksgiving more like the first Thanksgiving (meaning the one with Pilgrims and American Indians in 1623, I know there were "thanksgiving" type events before and that it was not a yearly holiday until much later) for ages, as I thought it would be fun and different to try to make dishes with that constraint. No one else thought that was a good idea (although my sister thought it was interesting), and so I never did, but this year since it will be tiny, we are doing it (but not being strict in some respects, for example, I don't have flint corn, so we are using sweet corn). Main dish is venison. Because of this I've been researching what was available, and realized that since it was in October, different types of fresh produce would have been available than can actually be harvested in November. October makes more sense in general if one is in a colder climate anyway.

    I found this interesting: "From the time of the Founding Fathers until the time of Lincoln, the date of observance varied from state to state. The final Thursday in November had become the customary date in most U.S. states by the beginning of the 19th century, coinciding with, and eventually superseding the holiday of Evacuation Day (commemorating the day the British exited the United States after the Revolutionary War)."

    I did know this: "Modern Thanksgiving was proclaimed for all states in 1863 by Abraham Lincoln. Influenced by Sarah Josepha Hale, who wrote letters to politicians for approximately 40 years advocating an official holiday, Lincoln set national Thanksgiving by proclamation for the final Thursday in November, explicitly in celebration of the bounties that had continued to fall on the Union and for the military successes in the war. Because of the ongoing Civil War, a nationwide Thanksgiving celebration was not realized until Reconstruction was completed in the 1870s."

    If you want it to be SUPER-authentic, you'll introduce a deadly disease to people who have no immunity to it....

    Oh....wait.....


    Sorry....dark humor is my jam today.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,900 Member Member Posts: 5,900 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    I always feel bad for Thanksgiving. Whenever I'd walk through Target during the holidays, they went straight from Halloween to Christmas, leaving maybe one end cap for Thanksgiving stuff.

    It deserves more!

    I wish we in the US would switch to a mid-October Thanksgiving like our Canadian neighbors. The weather would be better, and we'd have a longer gap to Christmas.

    I've wanted to do a Thanksgiving more like the first Thanksgiving (meaning the one with Pilgrims and American Indians in 1623, I know there were "thanksgiving" type events before and that it was not a yearly holiday until much later) for ages, as I thought it would be fun and different to try to make dishes with that constraint. No one else thought that was a good idea (although my sister thought it was interesting), and so I never did, but this year since it will be tiny, we are doing it (but not being strict in some respects, for example, I don't have flint corn, so we are using sweet corn). Main dish is venison. Because of this I've been researching what was available, and realized that since it was in October, different types of fresh produce would have been available than can actually be harvested in November. October makes more sense in general if one is in a colder climate anyway.

    I found this interesting: "From the time of the Founding Fathers until the time of Lincoln, the date of observance varied from state to state. The final Thursday in November had become the customary date in most U.S. states by the beginning of the 19th century, coinciding with, and eventually superseding the holiday of Evacuation Day (commemorating the day the British exited the United States after the Revolutionary War)."

    I did know this: "Modern Thanksgiving was proclaimed for all states in 1863 by Abraham Lincoln. Influenced by Sarah Josepha Hale, who wrote letters to politicians for approximately 40 years advocating an official holiday, Lincoln set national Thanksgiving by proclamation for the final Thursday in November, explicitly in celebration of the bounties that had continued to fall on the Union and for the military successes in the war. Because of the ongoing Civil War, a nationwide Thanksgiving celebration was not realized until Reconstruction was completed in the 1870s."

    If you want it to be SUPER-authentic, you'll introduce a deadly disease to people who have no immunity to it....

    Oh....wait.....


    Sorry....dark humor is my jam today.

    Okay, big gathering back on!
  • MsCzarMsCzar Member Posts: 39 Member Member Posts: 39 Member
    Took advantage of warm dry weather to put up some outdoor lights this week - but won't turn them on until December. That's also when the harvest wreaths and mailbox garlands will be switched for the Christmas version.

    I'm more of a Halloween person and I have a much beloved miniature Halloween village displayed in a glass-faced bookcase 365 a year. So do what makes you happy!
    edited November 24
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,900 Member Member Posts: 5,900 Member
    I also switch up a harvest wreath for a Christmas one, but I'm having the Christmas one delivered tomorrow, so may go ahead and put it up. I also have some Christmassy hanging baskets that I will put up on my front porch (the flowers that were in the ones currently up are dead, so they need to go).

    I hate the chore of putting up outdoor lights, but if not for that I'd have them up at least as of the time change, as I see them as as much about it being dark way too early and adding some counter to that as Christmas. Last year I didn't get the lights up until mid December, but I'll try to do it this weekend this year.
  • rosebarnalicerosebarnalice Member Posts: 2,826 Member Member Posts: 2,826 Member
    You be you, baby! Several friends have already decorated because it lifts their mood. Me? The tree may not even go up this year because I don't want the drama
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