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Anyone diagnosed with a food allergy as an adult?

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  • BelleRequinBelleRequin Member, Premium Posts: 15 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15 Member
    26 when I found out wheat and corn were big problems for me- not gluten, wheat.

    In terms of change, if I avoid those foods, I don’t suffer depression, asthma, cystic acne, GERD, or migraines. So it was a significant improvement. Doesn’t affect my weight at all though.
  • Jacq_quiJacq_qui Member Posts: 304 Member Member Posts: 304 Member
    Not personally diagnosed with a food allergy, but my kids were diagnosed with milk, tree nuts, ground nuts, egg, sesame when they were babies. So I had to learn how to avoid all these things and still provide some sort of normality pretty quick. My main gripe now is with poor labelling, (either it changes or fails to disclose 'may contain') and the price of allergen-free foods.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,452 Member Member Posts: 5,452 Member
    charmmeth wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    According to the allergist my pollen allergy has crossed into food allergy with all fruit. I meant to microwave for 30 seconds which destroys the protein that causes the allergy.

    Yes, I have had this experience too. I started out with a pollen allergy which did not affect me except in spring (along with allergies to house mites, and a few other things). In my mid-30s I suddenly started have allergic reactions to apples (until then my favourite fruit), which began as a tingling mouth but then fairly quickly (and rather scarily) went to the throat-swelling-up-to-block-the-windpipe stage. Organic seems to be less problematic, and peeling them can help, but I have stopped eating them after a few of these experiences. Apple juice and stewed apple are fine. However, I now react also to all thin-skinned fruit (peaches, nectarines, cherries, plums, pears etc), pineapple, and on occasion strawberries and tomatoes. At present organic tomatoes seem OK, and I eat a lot of them. I SOOO miss the fruit.

    Apparently developing from a pollen allergy to a thin-skinned fruit allergy is an adult is quite common, but no-one had warned me!

    My own particular allergic reaction is to a protein that is broken down when fruit is cooked. Just microwaving on high for 30 seconds (and then chilling to a palatable temperature) does the trick for me.
  • Katmary71Katmary71 Member Posts: 3,953 Member Member Posts: 3,953 Member
    I don't know if it's accurate but I did genetic testing and have Celiac on both sides, then it came up in a second test as an allergy. I did Paleo for awhile and there's a small difference in my pain levels with no sugar and gluten. I've tried adding back in dairy successfully. Eventually I'd like to get actual testing but my insurance is lousy so I'm experimenting for now. The only thing I seem to be super sensitive to is marijuana and I have no clue why, I've tried multiple strains! It causes such extreme pain until it wears off that I'd rather be skinned alive. Topically it helps though.
  • carakirkeycarakirkey Member Posts: 175 Member Member Posts: 175 Member
    charmmeth wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    According to the allergist my pollen allergy has crossed into food allergy with all fruit. I meant to microwave for 30 seconds which destroys the protein that causes the allergy.

    Yes, I have had this experience too. I started out with a pollen allergy which did not affect me except in spring (along with allergies to house mites, and a few other things). In my mid-30s I suddenly started have allergic reactions to apples (until then my favourite fruit), which began as a tingling mouth but then fairly quickly (and rather scarily) went to the throat-swelling-up-to-block-the-windpipe stage. Organic seems to be less problematic, and peeling them can help, but I have stopped eating them after a few of these experiences. Apple juice and stewed apple are fine. However, I now react also to all thin-skinned fruit (peaches, nectarines, cherries, plums, pears etc), pineapple, and on occasion strawberries and tomatoes. At present organic tomatoes seem OK, and I eat a lot of them. I SOOO miss the fruit.

    Apparently developing from a pollen allergy to a thin-skinned fruit allergy is an adult is quite common, but no-one had warned me!


    Same for me. I had known that cherries and peaches would make my throat scratchy and itchy, but then suddenly had a severe reaction to apples, and I often eat apples. And also had a reaction to zucchini. Oral Allergy syndrome. I'm not really allergic to apples but my body thinks I am. If they are peeled or cooked its less severe of a reaction. Sucks that I live in orchard country and can't really enjoy orchard fruits!
  • charmmethcharmmeth Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    My own particular allergic reaction is to a protein that is broken down when fruit is cooked. Just microwaving on high for 30 seconds (and then chilling to a palatable temperature) does the trick for me.
    Thank you: I should try this. If it works, it could be a reason to buy a microwave, which we don't currently have.

  • charmmethcharmmeth Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    carakirkey wrote: »
    Same for me. I had known that cherries and peaches would make my throat scratchy and itchy, but then suddenly had a severe reaction to apples, and I often eat apples. And also had a reaction to zucchini. Oral Allergy syndrome. I'm not really allergic to apples but my body thinks I am. If they are peeled or cooked its less severe of a reaction. Sucks that I live in orchard country and can't really enjoy orchard fruits!
    You have my sympathy! Thankfully, it is only fruit for me, and I have not had this reaction to zucchini. That would be a challenge as we eat a lot of it.

  • carakirkeycarakirkey Member Posts: 175 Member Member Posts: 175 Member
    yirara wrote: »

    I always assumed it was a cross allergy against.. no idea what. Fresh food from the garden is the worst, for example a small restaurant cooking with own produce in southern Europe. At other times though things are fine. The strands in bananas make me shudder by just thinking of them. Most things do get very edible when cooked though. Apart from walnuts and pecans, as they remain hard and don't really cook I suppose. *shrugs*

    I just had allergy testing and positive testing for walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, apples, peaches etc and allergy to birch pollen. The birch pollen allergy is what creates a reaction to the nuts and fruits- oral allergy syndrome. It somewhat makes sense that garden produce could have a more extreme reaction, and I've noticed that too.

    The allergist explained that I could eat apples, fruits etc as those should only cause a mild mouth reaction and not a true allergic reaction. However, I should avoid nuts (specifically walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, almonds) as the reaction can be severe enough to cut off the airway. I also carry an epi pen. I'm also allergic to soy which explains a lot about how awful I feel after having soy milk or soy protein.
  • tacticalhippietacticalhippie Member Posts: 602 Member Member Posts: 602 Member
    I developed an allergy to peanuts.
  • charmmethcharmmeth Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    carakirkey wrote: »
    I just had allergy testing and positive testing for walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, apples, peaches etc and allergy to birch pollen. The birch pollen allergy is what creates a reaction to the nuts and fruits- oral allergy syndrome. It somewhat makes sense that garden produce could have a more extreme reaction, and I've noticed that too.

    The allergist explained that I could eat apples, fruits etc as those should only cause a mild mouth reaction and not a true allergic reaction. However, I should avoid nuts (specifically walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, almonds) as the reaction can be severe enough to cut off the airway. I also carry an epi pen. I'm also allergic to soy which explains a lot about how awful I feel after having soy milk or soy protein.

    THis is what I have too, and the bit in bold was what I had gathered too. However, the reaction in m mouth/throat became more severe and quite scary over time, which is why I have stoppoed eating them.
  • silverpl2525silverpl2525 Member Posts: 113 Member Member Posts: 113 Member
    Earlier this year I swelled up after eating a piece of fruit. So now I have an official allergy with an epi pen. I also developed Oral Allergy Syndrome to lots of fruits, according to my allergist. Never had an issue with any of this when I was younger. So, partly to stay healthy and partly to avoid taking antihistamines everywhere I go and worry about anaphylaxis for the one fruit that I am truly allergic to, I don't eat fruit. Yup,... no fruit, no fruit smoothies, no yummy fruit gummies or dried fruit, no juices.

    Kinda sad situation, but I started a keto diet where you really aren't supposed to eat fruit. I tried to change something that was becoming super depressing into a positive diet. So far, I feel great, and although I miss fruit, I don't miss my tongue swelling or being super itchy in my throat! And yes, my Dr. said you can microwave the foods for 30sec and it will destroy the proteins that cause the Oral Allergy Syndrome. Supposedly you can also peel them, but I'm scared to do just that.
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