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Vegan, low fodmap struggle...

richiechownsrichiechowns Member Posts: 155 Member Member Posts: 155 Member
So recently, the last 3 months I've been eating low fodmap foods. This since an increase in calories to stop weight loss and facilitate my needs for training.

I used to suffer badly with bloating and gas prior to going vegan, then at 2800 cals wholefood plant based I was fine. However, the calorie increase caused the old issue to return.

I'm now struggling with macros as a lot of the foods which are low fodmap and higher cals are also high fat.

Any suggestions would be welcome..

Replies

  • MarttaHPMarttaHP Member Posts: 40 Member Member Posts: 40 Member
    It is interesting to me that going vegan helped you with your stomach issues! Are you entirely sure they were related to the FODMAP content of foods? I'm only asking since animal products are some of the only foods with no FODMAPs (well, dairy has lactose, but lactose-free options are common).

    Is there a reason why you would not want to eat a lot of fat? As far as I know, there is no recommended upper limit to healthy fats in your diet, only a lower limit.
  • juliagordonbramerjuliagordonbramer Member, Premium Posts: 2 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2 Member
    I am working to fight a bad case of SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) that requires me to be low FODMAP, as well as dairy and gluten-free. It's funny, but the dairy and gluten-free is much easier than the low FODMAP. I find myself craving things like mushrooms, onions, garlic and broccoli! Honestly, I give in to a lot of it and figure I am just trying my best. But still suffering, somewhat. And my fat percentage is up higher than I want it to be, also. I feel your struggle.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,110 Member Member Posts: 2,110 Member
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.
    edited November 19
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,128 Member Member Posts: 1,128 Member
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.

    Vegans would, do use bovine
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,110 Member Member Posts: 2,110 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.

    Vegans would, do use bovine

    I get it (my daughter is vegetarian). But Indian vegans have used it for centuries. Quite frankly, it's really the best treatment for IBS there is. But I also respect if someone wouldn't.

    https://www.drugs.com/npc/bovine-colostrum.html#:~:text=The use of colostrum for both medicinal and,protect infants against both human and bovine infections.

    The use of colostrum for both medicinal and spiritual purposes has been noted in the traditional Ayurvedic medical system and among the ancient Hindu rishis (spiritual leaders) of India. At the turn of the 20th century, the use of colostrum was advocated to protect infants against both human and bovine infections. Prior to the advent of sulfa drugs and other antibiotics, colostrum was used to boost defense against immune diseases. Albert Sabin isolated antipolio antibodies in bovine colostrum in the 1950s and the first experiments with hyperimmune colostrum were conducted in the 1960s.

    Rishis are vegan. I don't do cow dairy either and it's a derivative. Much like the whole honey thing but ethically, I understand if someone won't do it. Gluten free is very important for IBS. Likely more so anyway.
    edited November 20
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,310 Member Member Posts: 24,310 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.

    Vegans would, do use bovine

    I get it (my daughter is vegetarian). But Indian vegans have used it for centuries. Quite frankly, it's really the best treatment for IBS there is. But I also respect if someone wouldn't.

    https://www.drugs.com/npc/bovine-colostrum.html#:~:text=The use of colostrum for both medicinal and,protect infants against both human and bovine infections.

    The use of colostrum for both medicinal and spiritual purposes has been noted in the traditional Ayurvedic medical system and among the ancient Hindu rishis (spiritual leaders) of India. At the turn of the 20th century, the use of colostrum was advocated to protect infants against both human and bovine infections. Prior to the advent of sulfa drugs and other antibiotics, colostrum was used to boost defense against immune diseases. Albert Sabin isolated antipolio antibodies in bovine colostrum in the 1950s and the first experiments with hyperimmune colostrum were conducted in the 1960s.

    Rishis are vegan.

    I am not familar with the Rishi practice, but if it includes consuming colustrum I don't know how it could be considered vegan.

    I will add that there are many traditions of consideration or compassion for animals in human history that influenced the development of vegan ethics and even include many of the same principals, but stop short of a full rejection of animal exploitation. There are many religious traditions that fall into this category.
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,128 Member Member Posts: 1,128 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.

    Vegans would, do use bovine

    I meant would NOT!
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,128 Member Member Posts: 1,128 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    Maybe pea protein (peas are high FODMAP but pea protein is actually the opposite) and green bananas (safe for most that are on a FODMAP diet). Green bananas are resistant starch that most can tolerate and need with a low FODMAP diet, something that reduces fiber in general. Fiber is important because it improves SCFAs (butyrate is key and if you eat a low FODMAP diet it's drastically reduced) that are needed for certain microbe production to keep your immune system optimal.

    You might also look at Colostrum (bovine derived) and Cranberry extract -- both help tremendously with IBS. Stay away from gluten for sure, but it's hidden in a lot of products.

    Vegans would, do use bovine

    I get it (my daughter is vegetarian). But Indian vegans have used it for centuries. Quite frankly, it's really the best treatment for IBS there is. But I also respect if someone wouldn't.

    https://www.drugs.com/npc/bovine-colostrum.html#:~:text=The use of colostrum for both medicinal and,protect infants against both human and bovine infections.

    The use of colostrum for both medicinal and spiritual purposes has been noted in the traditional Ayurvedic medical system and among the ancient Hindu rishis (spiritual leaders) of India. At the turn of the 20th century, the use of colostrum was advocated to protect infants against both human and bovine infections. Prior to the advent of sulfa drugs and other antibiotics, colostrum was used to boost defense against immune diseases. Albert Sabin isolated antipolio antibodies in bovine colostrum in the 1950s and the first experiments with hyperimmune colostrum were conducted in the 1960s.

    Rishis are vegan.

    I am not familar with the Rishi practice, but if it includes consuming colustrum I don't know how it could be considered vegan.

    I will add that there are many traditions of consideration or compassion for animals in human history that influenced the development of vegan ethics and even include many of the same principals, but stop short of a full rejection of animal exploitation. There are many religious traditions that fall into this category.

    Exactly
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,128 Member Member Posts: 1,128 Member
    I have IBS C, coupled with SLE Lupus and Sjoegrens. I switched to a WFPB diet with fish then vegan. Veganism is awesome. I am also gluten free, don't eat beans, grains, starchy foods and of course no dairy, meat, animal..
    Its made a world of difference. I take a probiotic and herbs for gut health. Accupuncture and TCM are making a huge difference
  • mcates5mcates5 Member Posts: 3 Member Member Posts: 3 Member
    I am curious as to why low FODMAP would be high fat. You should still be able to eat most non-starchy vegetables like greens. I do understand that it is problematic to have to cut out beans as a vegan. When I was combining those two, I ended up just sacrificing protein for a period of time because it was less important than addressing the medical issues I was having.

    FODMAP is meant to be temporary. You should be able to identify your sensitivities, which is hopefully only one or two categories, and then allow the other ones back in. Challenge yourself with the bad foods at least once a month. I was able to reincorporate about 2 months after initially reacting and have since been able to tolerate the foods quite well. I find now that my reactions are intermittent and mostly when I eat too much.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,310 Member Member Posts: 24,310 Member
    mcates5 wrote: »
    I am curious as to why low FODMAP would be high fat. You should still be able to eat most non-starchy vegetables like greens. I do understand that it is problematic to have to cut out beans as a vegan. When I was combining those two, I ended up just sacrificing protein for a period of time because it was less important than addressing the medical issues I was having.

    FODMAP is meant to be temporary. You should be able to identify your sensitivities, which is hopefully only one or two categories, and then allow the other ones back in. Challenge yourself with the bad foods at least once a month. I was able to reincorporate about 2 months after initially reacting and have since been able to tolerate the foods quite well. I find now that my reactions are intermittent and mostly when I eat too much.

    I think the specific issue for OP is that the combination of creating meals that are vegan, higher calorie, and low FODMAP is leading him to consume more fat than he wants. Non-starchy vegetables are an option, but those tend to be lower calorie.
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