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Home heating

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  • youngmomtazyoungmomtaz Member Posts: 1,072 Member Member Posts: 1,072 Member
    We keep ours about 65degrees F in the winter. We have in floor heating but barely use it. We trucked 5tons of wood pellets in this year and heat with a pellet stove.

    In the summer the house stays at about 22degrees C. Sorry, I don’t know why but I have always used different measures depending on season. We have cement floors and the house stays naturally cool. We run a dehumidifier to keep the stickiness tolerable.
  • Slacker16Slacker16 Member Posts: 1,154 Member Member Posts: 1,154 Member
    I feel decadent admitting it but 20C in the bedroom and kitchen and 22 in the bathroom and living room.

    Stepping out of a hot shower into a cool bathroom is unpleasant, and the living room is on the corner with meh (at best) thermal insulation so it would periodically get chilly sitting next to the wall with a lower temperature. Doesn't make too big a difference on the heating bill, upside of apartment life, so I might as well splurge a bit...
  • tgillies003tgillies003 Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member Member, Premium Posts: 321 Member
    We keep our thermostat on the cooler side.
    It is set at 18.5 C. But it is right off the kitchen. The rest of the house is cooler.
    In the summer we have it set at about 22C. In summer the purpose is to reduce humidity.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,249 Member Member Posts: 2,249 Member
    Related to this thread, just got my November electric bill. $30. I love Winter in AZ. Summers are a different matter when it comes to energy bills. Now, I still have a very small gas bill too (like $25 to $50 unless it's pool heating season).
    edited December 2020
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,146 Member Member Posts: 23,146 Member
    I’m in Minnesota. We heat totally with wood, but have electric heat throughout our home for backup. We live in the country with 10 acres, about 7 of it mature hardwood. When we moved here, 34 years ago, the woods were almost impenetrable from undergrowth. Over the years, my husband has cleared a lot of undergrowth, and made several trails in the woods. So we have a ready supply of wood available. We lived in a major metropolitan area for the first 12 years of our marriage. Our furnace was kept at 68 degrees F. Now, we pretty much have it at 78-80 degrees F. We had the siding, windows, and doors all replaced in the past year. On sunny days, that really makes a difference, but still, the season for heating is long here. We have had a fire in our wood stove every month except for July. Normally we run the wood stove from late September through late April, early May, pretty continuously. We have a wood burning furnace too, but only use that when the temperature gets below zero Fahrenheit.

    Growing up, my dad kept the thermostat set at 70.

    Prior to heating with wood, I was never comfortably warm in the winter.

    As long as my husband is healthy enough, and willing to cut down, drag the trees out of the woods, cut, split and stack the wood, I’ll put up with the mess burning wood involves. Ash gets on everything. Dusting is a daily chore, and so is hauling out ash. Heating with wood, warms you many times in the process.

    I think 78-80 is my happy place for temperature.

    Heating with wood sure does warm you many times!

    In the 70s and 80s we had logs delivered. Mom would cut with the chain saw, Dad would split, and my brother and I would stack.

    These days Mom mostly gets split wood delivered, but sometimes there is a tree to harvest. My brother was splitting wood last week when I met a mold inspector there. I told the inspector, "Don't mind the man with the ax" LOL.

    They usually get a load of wood delivered prior to July 4, when we have a big family party, with plenty of hands to stack the wood. (That party was cancelled this year, though :( )

    Mom and my brother came here for Thanksgiving (we've been seeing them throughout the pandemic) and when Mom and I were walking in the woods after the meal she was drooling over a large fallen oak tree. I wonder if we should enlist a neighbor with a truck and chain saw to cut it up and bring it back, but that feels like even more work than is already involved...
    edited December 2020
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,393 Member Member Posts: 2,393 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I’m in Minnesota. We heat totally with wood, but have electric heat throughout our home for backup. We live in the country with 10 acres, about 7 of it mature hardwood. When we moved here, 34 years ago, the woods were almost impenetrable from undergrowth. Over the years, my husband has cleared a lot of undergrowth, and made several trails in the woods. So we have a ready supply of wood available. We lived in a major metropolitan area for the first 12 years of our marriage. Our furnace was kept at 68 degrees F. Now, we pretty much have it at 78-80 degrees F. We had the siding, windows, and doors all replaced in the past year. On sunny days, that really makes a difference, but still, the season for heating is long here. We have had a fire in our wood stove every month except for July. Normally we run the wood stove from late September through late April, early May, pretty continuously. We have a wood burning furnace too, but only use that when the temperature gets below zero Fahrenheit.

    Growing up, my dad kept the thermostat set at 70.

    Prior to heating with wood, I was never comfortably warm in the winter.

    As long as my husband is healthy enough, and willing to cut down, drag the trees out of the woods, cut, split and stack the wood, I’ll put up with the mess burning wood involves. Ash gets on everything. Dusting is a daily chore, and so is hauling out ash. Heating with wood, warms you many times in the process.

    I think 78-80 is my happy place for temperature.

    Heating with wood sure does warm you many times!

    In the 70s and 80s we had logs delivered. Mom would cut with the chain saw, Dad would split, and my brother and I would stack.

    These days Mom mostly gets split wood delivered, but sometimes there is a tree to harvest. My brother was splitting wood last week when I met a mold inspector there. I told the inspector, "Don't mind the man with the ax" LOL.

    They usually get a load of wood delivered prior to July 4, when we have a big family party, with plenty of hands to stack the wood. (That party was cancelled this year, though :( )

    Mom and my brother came here for Thanksgiving (we've been seeing them throughout the pandemic) and when Mom and I were walking in the woods after the meal she was drooling over a large fallen oak tree. I wonder if we should enlist a neighbor with a truck and chain saw to cut it up and bring it back, but that feels like even more work than is already involved...

    Oak is great once the fire is going. We usually pull dead/fallen trees for burning. My DH is a pretty good lumberjack, but last year he hired a company to cut 2 mature oaks that were dying.

    May be worth it to have someone do that for your mom. It’s heavy wood, so hard work., but, it’s great for burning and tending the fire.

    My husband works 2-10pm, so I’m tending the fire. He gets home at 11, so a piece of oak at 9 pm, and I can go to bed.
    edited December 2020
  • tmantwotmantwo Member Posts: 1,933 Member Member Posts: 1,933 Member
    Brick house. 3 fireplaces in the house and one in the pool house. As long as the sun hits the houses the heat pumps hardly kick on until temps get down below freezing.

    Had a cord of wood delivered, kept the living room
    fireplace going during the day for two days and let it burn down when I go to bed. Outside temps got up to about 40 during the day.

    Temp is pretty stable at almost 70 degrees throughout the first floor and warmer on the second.

    So at 30 or so degrees at night the heat pump kicks on but hardly any other time.

    Home heating and cooling is one of those quality of life things that is incredibly important to me.

    Being comfortable as cheap as possible is clutch.

    edited December 2020
  • Mouse_PotatoMouse_Potato Member Posts: 1,349 Member Member Posts: 1,349 Member
    I live in a hot climate (Houston, TX) and we don't really get winter down here. Today I had the A/C set at 73, but we have a cold front coming on Sunday, so I will probably put the heat on for a few days. It will likely also be 72-73 because we never get a chance to get used to colder weather before it warms back up again! Also, I like wearing tank tops year-round.
  • threewinsthreewins Member Posts: 813 Member Member Posts: 813 Member
    Here in New Zealand a huge number of people use these types of heaters
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    Fires are frowned upon because of the pollution, but it depends on the location.
  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,083 Member Member Posts: 6,083 Member
    I am always warm so I like it cool, 64.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,146 Member Member Posts: 23,146 Member
    This AM I never turned the heat up, was wearing a flannel shirt in addition to my usual stuff, and was comfortable at 58 degrees F until I changed out of my super warm slippers that I posted about on page 1.

    My OH was doing yardwork/storm prep this AM and didn't notice how low the temp was. He's acclimatizing to me :)
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Member Posts: 4,322 Member Member Posts: 4,322 Member
    I live in California and set my temperature between 72-75. Honestly, at 72 I’m freezing so usually have it warmer. I could never tolerate temps in the 60s for long. I get hypothermia.
  • The_EnginerdThe_Enginerd Member Posts: 3,906 Member Member Posts: 3,906 Member
    Apparently I keep my house pretty frigid, because the energy report I get from my gas company shows I use less than even the typical energy efficient home in my area despite having an old home built in the 1960's with zero insulation in the walls and the original single pane aluminum frame windows. I keep it around 66-67 usually, and let it fall to 65 at night.

    In the summer, I usually set the AC at 78. When I lived in dryer climates in the desert, I usually kept the house at 80.
  • Sadie2PointOhSadie2PointOh Member Posts: 34 Member Member Posts: 34 Member
    Winter Furnace : 72-74
    Summer A/C: 74-76

  • KickassAmazon76KickassAmazon76 Member Posts: 2,666 Member Member Posts: 2,666 Member
    I keep mine at around 71. Higher on the winter, but more because my house is over 100 yrs old and is a 2 story. It tends to have a bit of trouble keeping the house warm enough in all rooms, so some areas are warmer than others.

    We also get cold cold winters... And I hate feeling cold. Heat is a luxury I'll gladly pay for.
  • yirarayirara Member, Premium Posts: 5,807 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,807 Member
    At the moment I don't heat my home. This flat is a bit odd: there's heat coming from somewhere so I constantly keep my bedroom window open (I prefer fluffy thick duvets) and sometimes also have to open my balcony door in the livingroom to get the temperature down. Today it was 25C. The temperature is always highest on Monday, and lowest on Sunday. So basically: No idea where it comes from, but I don't need to put on my heating.
  • Dante_80Dante_80 Member Posts: 133 Member Member Posts: 133 Member
    I set it in December at 17.5C (64 in imperial?) and leave it at that for three months or so..
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