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Newly diagnosed with Diabetes 2.

smalltwngirl71smalltwngirl71 Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
How do I set My fitness pal up so it knows I'm a diabetic? Please help.

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  • happygirlrmlhappygirlrml Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member
    Hello, my name is Rose. Maybe, we can help one another. I am newly diagnoses as diabetic 2.
  • Megan_smartiepants1970Megan_smartiepants1970 Member, Premium Posts: 20,097 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,097 Member
    I was diagnose with type 2 diabetes back in 2019 when I was admitted for the flu/pneumonia for 9 days ...I came out of the hospital with insulin, metformin and other meds ... I am happy to report that I am off all meds and my blood sugar numbers are in the 90's (they were 200-300 + when I was in the hospital) I eat keto and walk with my daughter and my husky 6 days a week (I have lost 43 lbs so far ...Wishing you the very best ...You can turn it around :) If you are interested my food diary is open ..Feel free to add me if you would like :)
  • queanmumqueanmum Member Posts: 24 Member Member Posts: 24 Member
    Type 2 diabetic for 23 years here. The best advice I ever got was to count carbs and keep them at or below 100 gm/day. The dietician recommended a little book by "CalorieKing" for quick reference. It made a huge difference in my blood sugars. The second most helpful thing is my continuous glucose monitor "Freestyle Libre 14 day." I wear the sensor on my arm. I check a minimum of 4 times a day and whenever I feel the need to check. On me, it reads about 20 points lower than the lab test, so I take a reading and add 20. This has helped me greatly with knowing how certain foods or meals affect me. My A1C's are running 6.1, a number that a few years ago I didn't think was possible. Woo hoo! One thing that they don't tell you, is how badly fat affects diabetes. In the lab, when they need to make mice diabetic for research purposes, they feed them a super high fat diet. I make salad dressing without oil, saute onions in water or broth, never fry anything, or use oil for anything. I found this out by accident when I went vegan to avoid cardiac bypass surgery. Good luck and take care!
  • Poobah1972Poobah1972 Member, Premium Posts: 446 Member Member, Premium Posts: 446 Member
    musicfan68 wrote: »
    There isn't a way to set it that way specifically. You can set your carbs so you can track them at the number you need. You will have to subtract fiber to get net carbs.

    I agree, I just realized I could do this yesterday. So for my particular diet I've adjusted my macro's as follows... (Though I was already doing it prior to adjusting)

    15% Carbs Calories
    25% Protein Calories
    60% Fat Calories

    Mind you, I'm not diagnosed as diabetic so don't take my macro's as advice.

    However I did have the following blood levels this morning.

    Blood Ketones 1.9
    Blood Glucose 101

    Which equate to a GKI of 2.95 which reaches a "high therapeutic level of ketosis"

    I only mention that cause I found it interesting this morning... Again I'm not educated enough to give you any real advice as it relates to Diabetes 2... Other then my GKI this morning is very good level to be at for those that are in general. Your macro's and your body may well need adjustment.

    Other than that, you've come to the right place, and it is totally possible to do whatever you wish to do! There are plenty of great examples all around us. You can do it! It all starts now! :smile:
    edited April 1
  • jogmanjogman Member Posts: 10 Member Member Posts: 10 Member
    @JohnBarth. Here’s a pancake saver... 1 scoop Quest Cinnamon crunch protein powder/ 2 tbs coconut powder/ 1/2 tsp baking powder/ 1tbs butter(melted)/ 1 egg/dash of vanilla extract/ sweetener of your choice (I use 4 drops of liquid sucralose)/ add milk to the consistency you like (I use cashew milk) mix it all up and use as pancake batter - combine with Sugar free syrup and you have a diabetic alternative. You are right though check the meter to see how it affects you individually.
  • candylilacscandylilacs Member Posts: 580 Member Member Posts: 580 Member
    Keto pancakes with strawberries and whipped cream! bzq1jx2f3nl1.jpg
    edited April 7
  • g2renewg2renew Member Posts: 35 Member Member Posts: 35 Member
    How do I set My fitness pal up so it knows I'm a diabetic? Please help.

    Going down this path myself, so I can only share my experience to date.I set my carbs, fat, and protein to 30%, 35%, and 35%. It took a little bit of self education about nutrition and reading labels (or don't buy foods with labels!) Check online for a list of low glycemic load carbs and try to choose from the low end.

    In general- increase protein, fiber, water, and leafy greens. Tracking via MFP has been a HUGE help! Getting enough protein is sometimes hard, but that is another story. FYI: I use my settings as 'goals and guidelines', so if I miss by a little, I don't sweat it. Tomorrow is a new day!

    Look out for root veg and sneaky sugars. I cook more now and use real whole food-limit jars and bottles. No frozen meals. I am on very limited budget, so most veg are frozen section, but 'veg only'. Best choices for fruits are berries (strawberry/blueberry). Worst are ripe banana, but green ones are not as bad.

    Artificial sweeteners are NOT my friend, and I do better trying to stay as far away from anything sweet-except fruits- as possible. It took a few days to break my 'sweet tooth's' mastery over my life, but it is worth it. If I am going to have a sweet something, apple with peanut butter is helpful.If I want something really sweet, like about 1x month, I use real sugar-cane, honey, or maple syrup all 100%-and only a little. I have a small amount of 100% stevia for when I 'need' a little switch up to add to ACV or lemon water-about 2xweek. Fiber intake helps with satiety. Get psyillium husk. i eat by itself in tiny bits and drink water after. I get everything re-checked in a month and hope to see major improvement. Hidden sugar in food is sneaky and we really have to be aware of what is in the things we eat and drink.

    BTW: Like so many others, I was concerned that eating whole foods would make a significant increase in my groceries. If anything my total food budget is lower. Amazing! By eating REAL food (i.e., more nutrient dense), I am more satisfied with less, I don't feel the need to snack as much, I feel better. And shopping is easier!

    Wishing us all success on this journey!
    edited April 7
  • candylilacscandylilacs Member Posts: 580 Member Member Posts: 580 Member

    1/3 cup lupin flour fat-reduced almond flour or peanut flour* see notes!
    2 tablespoons almond flour
    2 teaspoons erythritol or 1/8 tsp pure monkfruit extract
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons melted butter coconut oil or ghee
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    4-6 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk **

    https://gnom-gnom.com/keto-pancakes/
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 9,206 Member Member Posts: 9,206 Member

    @smalltwngirl71 - I'm so sorry. That must have not been a fun discovery. Good luck in your 'new' lifestyle. Hugs

    @candylilacs - I haven't ventured into Lupin flour as of yet - Heard it's bitter and should always be paired with another 'typical' flour when baking. Do you love the stuff?
  • WellWishesSandyWellWishesSandy Member Posts: 11 Member Member Posts: 11 Member
    Sorry to hear this! This sort of diagnosis is a shock and scare. Be strong, take care of yourself the way you must and know you aren't alone!
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Member Posts: 6,164 Member Member Posts: 6,164 Member
    My four ingredient diabetic pancakes are protein powder (I use premium whey protein vanilla Labrada brand), egg, baking powder, and vanilla extract. Generally I top with Greek yogurt mixed with frozen berries, almond butter, and more vanilla. Chunks of dark chocolate if I’m feeling fancy. Roll it together, freeze, and cut into wheels for “ice cream” sandwiches! Like @g2renew I don’t eat artificial sweeteners, but if you do, you can add some.

    @smalltwmgirl71 You can set your menu to track fiber instead of some other micronutrient, and subtract the fiber from carbs to get net carbs. Or if you pay for premium it will supposedly let you track net carbs. Set your daily macros to whatever works for you, I think mine are at 30% carb 40% protein 30% fat right now, but I mostly ignore them because I am aiming for a certain number of carbs per meal, not per day, and it changes depending on when I exercised in relation to when I eat. There’s no way to tell the program you are diabetic because there’s no single way of eating which is right for all diabetics.

    The best advice I can give a newly diagnosed diabetic is to get a cheap blood sugar testing machine with inexpensive strips paid for out of your own pocket instead of trying to get insurance to pay, and test often after meals until you know how your own body reacts to different amounts and types of carbs. As was said above, it’s very individual. I have a friend who gets huge blood sugar spikes from tomatoes, I don’t, but I can’t eat even a small amount of white rice or a single flour tortilla without a spike. Corn tortillas don’t spike me, even though the carbs and the glycemic index are very similar. You might be the exact opposite! If you don’t test you don’t know. Most doctors will not tell you this, and discourage testing unless you are on insulin. But your doctor is not going to keep track of everything that happens with your body. For example, if I take a nap I get giant spikes afterwards. I would never have noticed without testing, but now I know to eat fewer carbs after a nap.

    The second advice is to exercise daily, and focus on exercising after meals. Studies have found that three ten minute walks after meals are better for your numbers than a single 30 minute walk taken at some other time of the day. You want to get moving and get your body to use those sugars in your bloodstream. Strength exercise also improves insulin resistance long term, so you should be doing both cardio and strength.

    And third, get that weight off. Even 5% of bodyweight can really improve your numbers.

    You got this! When I was diagnosed four years ago my a1c was 11. Now, with running, lifting, and being at a normal BMI, it’s consistently under 5 - which is in the normal range, not even prediabetic!

  • candylilacscandylilacs Member Posts: 580 Member Member Posts: 580 Member
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    @candylilacs - I haven't ventured into Lupin flour as of yet - Heard it's bitter and should always be paired with another 'typical' flour when baking. Do you love the stuff?

    Nah, I never use the stuff. I use Barney's Powdered Almond Butter. It's tasty! Gnom-gnom is lupin flour crazy, she changed the recipe after I downloaded it.
  • Reginleif01Reginleif01 Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    I have been battling the Type 2 for about 5+ years. This is a great bunch, very helpful tips here. Thanks a ton guys.
  • springlering62springlering62 Member, Premium Posts: 2,736 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,736 Member
    I am blessed. I’m not diabetic, although by rights I should have been, since both parents were.

    Please please please be mindful and take steps now.

    My mother was morbidly obese, while Dad’s weight was a roller coaster, depending on if he took his meds or not. Although my eating wasn’t great (I was obese myself at the time) she wouldn’t allow me to bring healthier meals, help clean or do laundry, rejected every offer to go for short walks. I discovered later she was so immobile, she’d been wetting herself.

    Someone here on MFP posted the other day that they do well to record 300 steps a day on their tracker. That may well have been more than my mom.

    Following a small car accident, she “rested” (more than usual) for several days, finally admitting she couldn’t get up at all any longer without assistance.

    Within days, she was bedridden, and over the next six or seven years, lost use of her limbs, atrophy starting with toes and working itself up to her tongue, til she was unable to eat, talk, or swallow.

    Ironically, as it turned out, she was on an enforced diet the last several years, since the nurses wouldn’t give her her beloved sweets or fast foods.

    It was a slow, agonizing death. She was utterly miserable. Those private nurses were saints, I’m telling you. Oh, and she blew through almost everything she had before she passed away. Her constant refrain- besides po’po’pitiful me- was,”what happens when my money runs out?”

    Also, the diabetes caused or aggravated some senility issues, making her personality less than pleasant.

    Dad? He passed away after a third fall in the shower, again, aggravated by diabetes and lack of mobility.

    This all sounds cold and cruel, but diabetes can be cold and cruel.

    This was what it took to wake me up. I was teetering on pre-diabetes. Even if I didn’t care about my own self, no way could I do that to my family.

    I implore you to stick around and make the best go of this that you can.
  • candylilacscandylilacs Member Posts: 580 Member Member Posts: 580 Member
    It was a slow, agonizing death. She was utterly miserable. Those private nurses were saints, I’m telling you. Oh, and she blew through almost everything she had before she passed away. Her constant refrain- besides po’po’pitiful me- was,”what happens when my money runs out?”

    This all sounds cold and cruel, but diabetes can be cold and cruel.

    My two parents weren't morbidly obese and they were diabetic. My father was average and my mother was a little overweight. My father was over-medicated (coumadin) and stage 4 renal failure and my mother was killed by a heart attack.(she went in her sleep.)

    (The doctors that they had weren't good, but that's what it's like being a diabetic. If you're 65 or 70, you're assigned your doctor.)

    So you can go slowly or go quick.

  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Member Posts: 6,164 Member Member Posts: 6,164 Member
    I am blessed. I’m not diabetic, although by rights I should have been, since both parents were.

    Please please please be mindful and take steps now.

    My mother was morbidly obese, while Dad’s weight was a roller coaster, depending on if he took his meds or not. Although my eating wasn’t great (I was obese myself at the time) she wouldn’t allow me to bring healthier meals, help clean or do laundry, rejected every offer to go for short walks. I discovered later she was so immobile, she’d been wetting herself.

    Someone here on MFP posted the other day that they do well to record 300 steps a day on their tracker. That may well have been more than my mom.

    Following a small car accident, she “rested” (more than usual) for several days, finally admitting she couldn’t get up at all any longer without assistance.

    Within days, she was bedridden, and over the next six or seven years, lost use of her limbs, atrophy starting with toes and working itself up to her tongue, til she was unable to eat, talk, or swallow.

    Ironically, as it turned out, she was on an enforced diet the last several years, since the nurses wouldn’t give her her beloved sweets or fast foods.

    It was a slow, agonizing death. She was utterly miserable. Those private nurses were saints, I’m telling you. Oh, and she blew through almost everything she had before she passed away. Her constant refrain- besides po’po’pitiful me- was,”what happens when my money runs out?”

    Also, the diabetes caused or aggravated some senility issues, making her personality less than pleasant.

    Dad? He passed away after a third fall in the shower, again, aggravated by diabetes and lack of mobility.

    This all sounds cold and cruel, but diabetes can be cold and cruel.

    This was what it took to wake me up. I was teetering on pre-diabetes. Even if I didn’t care about my own self, no way could I do that to my family.

    I implore you to stick around and make the best go of this that you can.

    My mom’s best friend, who was the “cool auntie” I went to for advice during those difficult teenage years, died of complications of diabetes the year I was diagnosed. She had been insulin-dependent for years, was morbidly obese despite surgery (she ate so much she stretched her stomach to a larger size), had kidney failure, liver failure, and so on.

    She was a very intelligent and strong-willed person except when it came to her relationship with food. I don’t understand what was going on there, but I do wish it could have been different. And it definitely inspired me to lose weight and get my diabetes under control.

    The other thing that motivated me to act quickly on my diabetes turns out to have been a blessing in the long run, although it panicked me at the time! When I was first treated, the sudden lowering of my blood sugar from constantly in the 270 range to more like 130 caused my vision to become very blurry. This is actually a common side effect of treatment and doesn’t last long, usually about six weeks. But being unable to read or drive when I had fine vision before made me aware that these were not just numbers on a page, if I didn’t do something about my blood sugar it was hurting my body. I didn’t want to go blind - a common side effect of diabetes - or lose a foot, or anything else like that.
  • rick60rtrick60rt Member, Premium Posts: 30 Member Member, Premium Posts: 30 Member
    YouTube DR. JASON FUNG.
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