Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Fitness and Exercise
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Program design for inexperienced PT

rachelmousellukrachelmouselluk Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
Can anyone help me with the best sources to correctly and confidently create a program for clients. Each and everyone has totally different goals and needs so I want something handy that I can refer to whilst at the gym when I first meet them and need to build a program. No time to go search through YouTube or some huge PT manual.
Thanks for your help.

Replies

  • rachelmousellukrachelmouselluk Member Posts: 2 Member Member Posts: 2 Member
    Level 3 qualification. I totally appreciate everything you say and yes, YouTube and PT manual, blogs etc are continual references at home. In the gym its left to the PTs on the floor to pitch to potential customers using the gym and as the least experienced I find I get blank on info. What I am good at is talking to them and understanding their needs but find the less principled one-size-fits-all trainers nail them with confidence before me. The loads of programs written by experienced trainers you refer to sound great for another start point - which platform are these on if not YouTube or longer books. Its really the program building that I'm looking for.
    Thanks so much again for your help.
  • sijomialsijomial Member, Premium Posts: 17,971 Member Member, Premium Posts: 17,971 Member
    Level 3 qualification. I totally appreciate everything you say and yes, YouTube and PT manual, blogs etc are continual references at home. In the gym its left to the PTs on the floor to pitch to potential customers using the gym and as the least experienced I find I get blank on info. What I am good at is talking to them and understanding their needs but find the less principled one-size-fits-all trainers nail them with confidence before me. The loads of programs written by experienced trainers you refer to sound great for another start point - which platform are these on if not YouTube or longer books. Its really the program building that I'm looking for.
    Thanks so much again for your help.

    Confidence comes with practice but until then there is an element of "fake it until you make it" while you are gaining experience, especially in a competitve environment.

    You may also find that not everyone is completely different in their needs and a few good basic structures and principles that can be built on works quite well.
    But these do need to be in your head as you need to be interacting with your clients and not have your head buried in a folder or your phone. Good trainers talk, listen and observe a lot.

    Have a read of the "Most Helpful Posts - Fitness and Exercise (Must Reads)" pinned to the top of this forum which could be very useful for the lifting side of things.
  • nogymheronogymhero Member Posts: 24 Member Member Posts: 24 Member
    Shouldn't you be asking this type of question on a forum that is dedicated to fitness and training professionals? MFP isn't really a professional forum although we do have some accomplished trainers here. It looks like you need to understand how to do a workup on clients before the training sessions because you shouldn't be doing this on the fly. I've never seen a trainer who doesn't have a program ready before they start.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 44,375 Member Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 44,375 Member
    Starting off is one of the toughest things to do. One thing I will say is "don't give them your workout". That's a common mistake with new PT's.
    If you assess them correctly, you'll know what their strengths and weaknesses are. You emphasize exericse on the weak areas and moderate the areas that they are already strong at. For example, if their arms are in good shape, I may only assign 1 bicep and 1 tricep exercise. But if their shoulders are bad, then I'll focus on more volume for that hitting every angle.
    All in all you need to know the client. There is NO one correct program that always is a go to. Realize that they are relying on you to program for them, so they are going to take your word. And you should be able to explain to them why they are performing a certain exercise or program. Again, program to what's conducive to their goals. Don't add stuff in (say HIIT work for example) if it has NOTHING to do with what they are trying to achieve just cause it sounds good to do.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
    edited February 23
Sign In or Register to comment.