Sugar addict

Seriously addicted to SUGAR. Using it as my drug. This is sooo frustrating. Please help!
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Replies

  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,756 Member
    What type of help do you need?
  • penguinmama87
    penguinmama87 Posts: 945 Member
    I don't consider myself a sugar addict, but I do know there are certain foods that it's best for me to just not have around, because it's incredibly difficult for me to stay moderate with them. For a while I wouldn't even go out by myself because I would sneak in a trip to go off plan. And I have a person I can immediately go to when I feel really stressed out for emotional support (which is my main trigger for overeating.) Any of these might be helpful starting points for you.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,507 Member
    Start using sugar substitutes. There are foods made with sugar substitutes (although test them first because some can give you stomach issues). I'm an avid Diet Pepsi fan. 0 calories is always a win and still get sweetness.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    I have a sweet tooth also. All or nothing doesn't work for me, so I allow 200 calories a day for a sweet treat. It's part of my budget.

    I only have things in the house I can moderate. A full carton of ice cream? Nope. 130 calorie cookie packs and individually wrapped Ghiradelli dark chocolate squares at the moment.

    I drink a diet soda, and 2 cups of chai (with stevia) everyday also.
  • zaj17
    zaj17 Posts: 4 Member
    I am with you on this. I'm really starting to wonder if I've got a chemical imbalance or something because I can not stay away. I know I know, some people are going to say "you can stay away if you really want". With sugar its more than just wanting to not have it.
    I guess I don't have any suggestions for you but wanted you to know you're not alone. I think eventually I will probably have to cut it out 100% because I'm far too undisciplined to be able to have just a bit at a time.
  • habu68123
    habu68123 Posts: 79 Member
    I also have a terrible time with sugar and recently received test results that put me firmly in the diabetic range. I knew the results weren't going to be good but frankly I am still in shock. Hoping to turn it around between diet and exercise.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,755 Member
    When you say you're addicted to sugar, which kinds of foods do you have trouble moderating, specifically? Literally anything sugar including plain table sugar, or more like treat foods (cookies, candy, etc.)?

    For me, it helped reduce my cravings for calorie-dense sweets (cookies, other baked goods, candy), when I started making it a point to eat fruit routinely, starting at 3 servings daily. It took a bit of willpower, I guess, for a short number of weeks, but did result in reduced desires for the calorie-dense, nutrient-poor options. After a while, I was able to reduce fruit servings, just eat it to taste preference, and keep that effect. Super-sweet simple-flavored things (like grocery store baked goods) now mostly taste way too sweet, and too simple (not varied enough flavor), though I still like a rich dessert or some good chocolate now and then.

    This doesn't work for everyone, but I'm not the only one here whom I've seen say found it helpful. (Original suggestion came from a registered dietitian, BTW.)

    Might be worth a try?
  • Deewithadoo
    Deewithadoo Posts: 25 Member
    Thank you for your replies! Will try some of your suggestions.
  • shellyferguson14
    shellyferguson14 Posts: 24 Member
    Late to the party, I'm with you this is my exact problem, sugar addiction, non diabetic 138 pounds trying to get to 120 got all the way down to 129, can not stop eating sugar ,love fruit eat it all the time along with as much sugar as I can get it my mouth lol, don't feel guilty just resign.
  • ALZ14
    ALZ14 Posts: 202 Member
    I was borderline addicted and I decided to give up desserts/sweets for Lent. Before I was eating a dozen bakery cookies in about 24 hours and a treat after lunch and dinner and a few m&ms before bed.

    The first 10 days were brutal and I was majorly regretting being so broad in my sacrifice. Now it is a lot better, yes I still want a cookie but I’m not about to rip someone’s head off if they eat one in front of me.

    I know I’ll have a bunch of Reese candy on Easter, I’m just hoping I can maintain some control from that point forward.
  • girlinkaz
    girlinkaz Posts: 90 Member
    I quit sugar at the beginning of Feb for my health and I so feel you! I find it really hard to stay away - and honestly my first week with no sugar usually gives me withdrawal symptoms (no joke), like headaches and lethargy. But, at least for me, once I get through that first week all my energy comes back and I realize what I’m doing to my body when I feed my addiction. I’d love to be able to have a little from time to time and have it not be a big deal (which is the healthiest approach), but I haven’t figured out how to do that yet!
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,447 Member
    ALZ14 wrote: »
    I was borderline addicted and I decided to give up desserts/sweets for Lent. Before I was eating a dozen bakery cookies in about 24 hours and a treat after lunch and dinner and a few m&ms before bed.

    The first 10 days were brutal and I was majorly regretting being so broad in my sacrifice. Now it is a lot better, yes I still want a cookie but I’m not about to rip someone’s head off if they eat one in front of me.

    I know I’ll have a bunch of Reese candy on Easter, I’m just hoping I can maintain some control from that point forward.

    But if you’ve come this far, why throw in the towel for those Reese’s just to start over again?

    You’ve got to start somewhere, and you already have. Just sayin’.

    It was always the “I’ll start tomorrow after all the treats are gone” mentality that kept me obese for thirty years.

    Trust me, the treats are never gone.
  • 7rainbow
    7rainbow Posts: 161 Member
    I am totally the same! I legit would eat about 10 cookies a day. Here are my tips:
    1) Find out what your weaknesses are. Mine is cookies. I needed a bit of a break from them as I started my journey cause I just couldn't resist them.
    2) Find substitutes. Now I'm not saying 'eat a salad instead of doughnuts' cause that is ridiculous and they are no where close. But I've been trying to make muffins, even unhealthy ones (like smores muffins, mmm!) to fill my sugar cravings. Even though they aren't the healthiest, I'll eat 2 at most, and can limit myself with them better than cookies. I like hot chocolate too as a quick sugar fix.
    3) Learn what triggers your sugar cravings. Typically there are reasons. Are you just hungry? Try making more filling meals so you have less sweet snacks. Are you emotionally eating? Think about how you feel before and after you eat these things. It's helped me for sure.
    4) If you live with people, try to get them to hold you accountable for not buying sweet treats or making them.
    5) If it isn't in the house you can't eat it. Grocery shopping is key. Are there aisles you can avoid? I steer clear of the bakery or else I'm in deep trouble!
    6) It's not about saying no, it's about saying less. If you tell yourself you can't eat cake and cookies and chocolate you are going to crave them more. You can have those things and still lose weight! Just make sure to log your calories and you will be fine.
    Hope some of these help, good luck!
  • mcalla2000
    mcalla2000 Posts: 3 Member
    Getting off refined sugars today. It usually takes about 3 days for the cravings to ease. When I get my sugar from moderate fruits and only certain carbs like sweet potatoes, I feel in balance. In 2018 I stayed with this for the whole year so I know it can work for me.
  • PamGeirng
    PamGeirng Posts: 165 Member
    My friend who is a nutritional coach says to put cinnamon in your coffee or eat oatmeal. She says that cinnamon and oatmeal level out your blood sugar and help take away the cravings. I think oatmeal with cinnamon mixed in would be good. Maybe give it a try???
  • MegansMom2011
    MegansMom2011 Posts: 358 Member
    edited March 2021
    For me, I've learned from my wise grandma that having hard candies are the perfect solution. It's a longer lasting sugar fix than eating cookies or other sweets, and it gives me that oral fixation that I need plus the real sugar, but it doesn't have a ton of calories. So when everyone else is eating ice cream, but I already have something tasty in my mouth, I'm not going to spit it out to eat ice cream, I'm going to continue enjoying it. My mouth is already busy with the flavor it has, so it's satisfied. You could do that with mints, too.

    I've had the best success with just completely cutting it out at the beginning of my day, because if I put sugar in my coffee or have pancakes and syrup for breakfast, then I crave sugar the whole day, but if I eat eggs or something, then I'm not craving sugar. Your first meal sets the tone for the rest of your day.

    Hang in there, you're not alone in this!
  • aquitteriamnot
    aquitteriamnot Posts: 78 Member
    Sugar is like any other addictive drug to certain people. I have to keep sugar out of my home and only eat sweetener in moderation. Try greek yogurt and eat more protein to reduce carb cravings.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,447 Member
    PamGeirng wrote: »
    My friend who is a nutritional coach says to put cinnamon in your coffee or eat oatmeal. She says that cinnamon and oatmeal level out your blood sugar and help take away the cravings. I think oatmeal with cinnamon mixed in would be good. Maybe give it a try???

    If you add cinnamon, spend the extra buck or so and get Vietnamese or Saigon cinnamon. The flavor is worlds away from “regular” grocery store cinnamon. Amazon/Whole Foods’ Frontier Co-op brand is unbelievable. I buy it by the pound now.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,755 Member
    PamGeirng wrote: »
    My friend who is a nutritional coach says to put cinnamon in your coffee or eat oatmeal. She says that cinnamon and oatmeal level out your blood sugar and help take away the cravings. I think oatmeal with cinnamon mixed in would be good. Maybe give it a try???

    If you eat a lot of cinnamon, read up on the coumarin content of various types, and consider drug interactions if you're taking other blood thinners (or need to avoid blood thinners for some reason). It's somewhat controversial, how much is too much, and how much is good . . . so I'd consider it something to look into on one's own and decide. I use quite a lot of cinnamon (daily), and decided to prefer Ceylon cinnamon for the reported relatively lower coumarin content, but others may make a different choice.