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I can’t lift heavy more than 2 times a week

serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
I seem to have longer recovery time. I get nagging body aches if I lift heavy more than two times per week (ie squats, deadlifts, etc). Normal? Even if I add a day just to do bands, I’m over doing it.

Replies

  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,217 Member Member Posts: 10,217 Member
    What I've heard is 3 days a week is best for people newer to lifting, and 2 days for people who aren't new. If you're lifting heavy, you need recovery time.
  • MT1134MT1134 Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Is there any particular reason you want to lift heavy more than twice a week? Twice is good for most. Especially if that's how your body is responding.
  • Justin_7272Justin_7272 Member, Premium Posts: 266 Member Member, Premium Posts: 266 Member
    Are you running a program? Most will target specific muscle groups once or twice per week, or will run a heavy-medium-light split. If you're lifting heavy multiple times per week, I wouldn't expect more than twice.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    What does “heavy” mean?

    How many reps and sets?

    Lifting to failure or leaving some in the tank?
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Context is missing.
    Age?
    Calorie deficit or not?
    What your volume is during your two sessions? Duration?
    Lifting experience?
    Other exercise?
    Is this poor recovery a new thing?
    When was last time you had a deload or extended recovery?


    PS - you need to vet your friend requests more carefully, there's a bunch of hijacked accounts with soft porn profile pictures in your friend list!

    50 years old

    Eating 2,000 cals a day maintenance

    1 hour of hip thrusts, squats, band work, RDLs etc (to failure progressive OL)

    Been lifting heavy 5 years overall lifting 30 years

    Kick box 2 times week, walking everyday

    Poor recovery more so past few years 45+

    Took 8 days off very recently to recover bc was very sore all the time lower back and knees

    I’ll check my friends lol thanks
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    wiigelec wrote: »
    What does “heavy” mean?

    How many reps and sets?

    Lifting to failure or leaving some in the tank?

    Failure:

    Hip thrust 300 lbs

    Barbell back Squat - 120 lbs

    Deadlift - 115 - 120lbs (on hold due to back pain)

    Sissy squat - high reps and sets to failure

    Band work - abductions, donkey kick, bridge side lying clam etc

    Progressive OL every week - time under tension, range of motion, reps etc

    I’m pretty advanced in lifting for 50 years old

  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    I would definitely think lifting to failure is not doing you any favors.

    I’ll let the more experienced chime in but it seems the general consensus would be to take some weight off the bar and add sets as required, though you didn’t state specifically number of sets and reps.

    Perhaps a statement of your specific goals would be in order here, as that can help pin down appropriate rep ranges.
    edited April 6
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    wiigelec wrote: »
    I would definitely think lifting to failure is not doing you any favors.

    please elaborate no what I can do instead. I'm going too hard aren't I.

    I live in Toronto and we've been in lockdown and gyms have been closed since November. I've been using exercise as a way to cope mentally. I think I'm developing an obsession with weekly progressive OL and lifting heavy as an outlet to deal with this pandemic.

    We are going into Wave 3 and another heavy lockdown on top of already being basically locked down for 5 months. Looooong winter!!!!



  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    I’ve found this video quite helpful, though I anticipate it may raise more questions for you than it answers:

  • sijomialsijomial Member, Premium Posts: 18,250 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,250 Member
    Going to failure is massively fatiguing and should be used sparingly. It's not necessary to go to failure to progress.
    Suggest leaving a couple of reps in the tank and going to failure as an occassional test might let you recover better.

    Your routine is very leg/lower body focussed.
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    I'm an ecto-meso. Wide shoulders and a v-shape with small hips and waist and long lean legs (pancake butt if I don't do legs and glutes). I am 5'8", 129 lbs and about 19% bf. I have very small wrists and long limbs, but a good ability to build muscle - fast metabolism.

    For upper, I just do push-ups, and I have a TRX at home that I use for back. I also use 20lb dumbbells for low rows, pull backs, etc. I just train my back for posture and health, not for size bc I have very wide shoulders.

    - began by following Strong Curves (Bret Contreras). I have built really nice glutes, hams and quads. I had a PT once a week during the winter/spring lockdown, but he's not available for the next month and I'm on my own.

    Now I'm finding at age 50, I'm hitting the overtraining pain and that's not smart training at all if my body is saying "stop doing that to me".

    So perhaps try lower weight, higher reps once a week and then go super heavy once a week?

    My hip thrust is crazy:

    1st set: 190 lbs for 10
    2nd set: 240 lbs for 10
    3rd set: 290 for 5 pause reps (up 2...3... up 2...3)
    4th set: 300 for 5 pause reps
    5th set: 240 lbs until failure (maybe 7)
    6th set: 190 lbs until failure (maybe 10)
    7th set: 120 lbs for 20

    Just looking at that makes me tired!!!

  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    wiigelec wrote: »
    I’ve found this video quite helpful, though I anticipate it may raise more questions for you than it answers:


    This is very helpful. I've been at a 9 or 10 LOL I go nuts on the hip thrust and it's a small ROM. I'm also going too heavy on DLs. I am hard on myself because I feel I should be able to lift at least 120 lbs for 2 sets of 8 and I force my body to do it.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    So perhaps try lower weight, higher reps once a week and then go super heavy once a week?
    Perhaps, but “lower weight”, “higher reps”, and “super heavy” could benefit from more specific definitions.
    edited April 6
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    I am hard on myself because I feel I should be able to lift at least 120 lbs for 2 sets of 8 and I force my body to do it.
    Probably a good way to get injured, sounds like you’re already on your way there.
  • wiigelecwiigelec Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    I would definitely recommend researching how to use RPE to manage your intensity and volume.
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,774 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,774 Member
    I lift heavy every workout (daily) but I only train one body part a day. I don't train it again till a week later. Lol, plenty of recovery time for me.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • serapelserapel Member Posts: 487 Member Member Posts: 487 Member
    wiigelec wrote: »
    I am hard on myself because I feel I should be able to lift at least 120 lbs for 2 sets of 8 and I force my body to do it.
    Probably a good way to get injured, sounds like you’re already on your way there.

    Thank you for your help. I appreciate it.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 456 Member Member Posts: 456 Member
    Like others have said, going to failure on every exercise every workout and then repeating it all over again is probably the reason why you're not recovering after a day or two. Overtraining or trying to push yourself actually backfires, and you won't progress as quickly as you could if you would back off a bit.

    I'm 44 and have had issues with overtraining and am still working on muscle imbalances. I lift heavy 3 days a week. However, only 4 of those are compound lifts (lower/upper) and then some accessory work. I also have been doing a Daily Undulating Periodization program, where I focus on 2 compound lifts per month. I train those 3 days a week and build up by the end of the month to hit PR's on those, but the other lifts are on "maintenance" during that time. Towards the end of the month I may be sore, but typically not to the point where I can't do the 3 times per week normally. actually read about this in Bret Contreras' newer book, Glute Lab. If you like him, he now has a You Tube channel, and he may even have something about this type of program. If not, I know there's a link to DUP at the top of this forum in the weight lifting program sticky.
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