How much to eat?

https://qr.ae/pGNByd
What are everyone’s thoughts?
I learnt this is my eating disorder recovery🍀💖🌟🙂🌟💖🍀

Replies

  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 33,841 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 5,949 Member
    There seem to be some 'intuitive eating' vibes in that text that I can't subscribe to.
    Listening to my body's 'cues' is what lead me to gain weight consistently during exam periods, to use an example quoted.
    I don't think the cues we get are always proportionate to our calorie needs, and on top of that these cues will vary enormously from one person to another.

    But sure, eating only once a day is definitely not a necessity.
    Some people find OMAD (one meal a day) helpful to restrict calories and lose weight. Others find eating 6 smaller meals helpful, since they get too hungry eating fewer meals. I'm personally in between: I'd be hungry constantly when eating 6 smaller meals (I tried it, but it made me gain weight since I could not stay within my allowed portion sizes per meal), but OMAD is too extreme for me too. I think it's very individual, both physically as well as psychologically, personal habits and daily routine,...

    For eating disorder recovery, I think it's best to consult professionals who know your case, since every individual has different needs and different triggers.
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    I am actually cured from my eating disorder but dietitians also teach the same thing eat 3 small meals and 2-3 snacks mostly healthy of course. The doctor says eating that way keeps the metabolism burning fat eating every 3 hours as long as the 3 meals are not big meals. I have my meals off a bread and butter plate 1/2 the size of a normal plate and 1-1and a quarter cups of sultana bran with milk. Small 100g yoghurt with a teaspoon of fruit and nuts for snack. Meat mashed potato and veggies or a mini wraps with meat and cheese and salad plus mayo for my lunch or dinner usually sometimes I’ll have a burger or fish and chips but only occasionally
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    edited April 2021
    I am actually cured from my eating disorder but dietitians also teach the same thing eat 3 small meals and 2-3 snacks mostly healthy of course. The doctor says eating that way keeps the metabolism burning fat eating every 3 hours as long as the 3 meals are not big meals. I have my meals off a bread and butter plate 1/2 the size of a normal plate and 1-1and a quarter cups of sultana bran with milk. Small 100g yoghurt with a teaspoon of fruit and nuts for snack. Meat mashed potato and veggies or a mini wraps with meat and cheese and salad plus mayo for my lunch or dinner usually sometimes I’ll have a burger or fish and chips but only occasionally

    It may help to know that your metabolism works all day long whether you're choosing to eat once a day or six times a day. The important thing is the number of calories you're taking in overall relative to how much your body is using.

    Many people do find more frequent eating to help them in meeting their calories goals, but there are others who snack infrequently or even eat just once or twice a day. It all comes down to calories.

    Of course, if someone is getting specific advice from their ED treatment team, that should be taken into account.
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    The metabolism burns fat when eating the right amounts of food the right amount of times per day and the healthier the better also eating every 3-4 hours keeps the metabolism revved up all day long eating 3 small meals and 2-3 healthy snacks with a treat every now and then does work wonders. My weight started going up to start off with because I wasn’t eating enough but now my weight is coming down on the scale so it works for me
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    There seem to be some 'intuitive eating' vibes in that text that I can't subscribe to.
    Listening to my body's 'cues' is what lead me to gain weight consistently during exam periods, to use an example quoted.
    I don't think the cues we get are always proportionate to our calorie needs, and on top of that these cues will vary enormously from one person to another.

    But sure, eating only once a day is definitely not a necessity.
    Some people find OMAD (one meal a day) helpful to restrict calories and lose weight. Others find eating 6 smaller meals helpful, since they get too hungry eating fewer meals. I'm personally in between: I'd be hungry constantly when eating 6 smaller meals (I tried it, but it made me gain weight since I could not stay within my allowed portion sizes per meal), but OMAD is too extreme for me too. I think it's very individual, both physically as well as psychologically, personal habits and daily routine,...

    For eating disorder recovery, I think it's best to consult professionals who know your case, since every individual has different needs and different triggers.

    It’s taught by doctors, eating disorder experts and dietitians and if your eating to much or too little your weight can go up
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I disagree eating disorders are not because of anxiety and poor coping skills at all. It’s a weight loss obsession that can and does lead to death
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I no longer have an eating disorder and they don’t teach people in recovery about counting calories
  • penguinmama87
    penguinmama87 Posts: 1,158 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I no longer have an eating disorder and they don’t teach people in recovery about counting calories

    That probably depends a bit on the patient, the disorder, and the treatment plans that psychiatrists or other health care providers are familiar with. There's an inpatient ED facility near me that emphasizes teaching nutrition as part of long term recovery.

    I could see calorie counting being inappropriate for some people who might have obsessive tendencies. But it could also be really helpful for some - the numbers are the numbers. There's no emotions or judgment attached. That by itself could be really freeing.
  • wunderkindking
    wunderkindking Posts: 1,615 Member
    edited April 2021
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I no longer have an eating disorder and they don’t teach people in recovery about counting calories

    That probably depends a bit on the patient, the disorder, and the treatment plans that psychiatrists or other health care providers are familiar with. There's an inpatient ED facility near me that emphasizes teaching nutrition as part of long term recovery.

    I could see calorie counting being inappropriate for some people who might have obsessive tendencies. But it could also be really helpful for some - the numbers are the numbers. There's no emotions or judgment attached. That by itself could be really freeing.

    Most restrictive EDs hinge HEAVILY on counting calories - and trust me with a disorder there's a lot of judgement and emotions attached to the numbers. It COULD be freeing - except the part where it's a disorder.

    It's just not a good place to go with an ED. At all. No matter what the 'healthy' brain may do with it.

    Sometimes, SOMETIMES, there will be meal plans that require patients in recovery hit calorie minimums and those are raised slowly through early recovery. The goal is NO counting and eating regularly and listening to your body. NOT counting at ALL.

    The restrictive nature of the ED does very much rely on, yeah, counting and restricting calories. Always? No. Not even every restrictive ED sufferer, but often enough. An obsession with them that can start out healthy and turn to 'how low can I go' based on KNOWING the calories, weighing, measuring, all that stuff we do to lose weight, here, only to a point that can and does lead to death.


  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I no longer have an eating disorder and they don’t teach people in recovery about counting calories

    That probably depends a bit on the patient, the disorder, and the treatment plans that psychiatrists or other health care providers are familiar with. There's an inpatient ED facility near me that emphasizes teaching nutrition as part of long term recovery.

    I could see calorie counting being inappropriate for some people who might have obsessive tendencies. But it could also be really helpful for some - the numbers are the numbers. There's no emotions or judgment attached. That by itself could be really freeing.

    I have been through eating disorder recovery through psychotherapy and cbte with fully qualified eating disorder therapists I believe they are right with what they teach for each individual
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    The metabolism burns fat when eating the right amounts of food the right amount of times per day and the healthier the better also eating every 3-4 hours keeps the metabolism revved up all day long eating 3 small meals and 2-3 healthy snacks with a treat every now and then does work wonders. My weight started going up to start off with because I wasn’t eating enough but now my weight is coming down on the scale so it works for me

    If you're in a deficit, you'll be burning fat even if you aren't eating the "right" amount of food, at the "right" times of day, or if your food isn't the healthiest.

    Some people find it easier to be in a deficit when they're doing the things above. That would be the reason to do those things -- if they make your life easier. Your metabolism will work all day regardless of your meal quantity or timing.

    Obviously there are additional considerations for people recovering from an ED. There is a psychological component to meal quantity and timing in those situations and your treatment team is the best guide. But just for the purposes of weight management, individuals will do best adopting the quantity and timing that best supports them meeting their calorie goal.
  • kenyonhaff
    kenyonhaff Posts: 1,377 Member
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I disagree eating disorders are not because of anxiety and poor coping skills at all. It’s a weight loss obsession that can and does lead to death

    A lot of things contribute to eating disorders...including contact with Western civilization, anxiety, poor social skills, a parent with body or food issues, normalizing by peers, etc. That can lead to a weight loss obsession in eating disorders.

    It's a fine difference, but a difference. No one is born with alcoholism-- it's an illness in which biology, environment, culture, and more contribute to the actual disorder that can occur.
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    The metabolism burns fat when eating the right amounts of food the right amount of times per day and the healthier the better also eating every 3-4 hours keeps the metabolism revved up all day long eating 3 small meals and 2-3 healthy snacks with a treat every now and then does work wonders. My weight started going up to start off with because I wasn’t eating enough but now my weight is coming down on the scale so it works for me

    If you're in a deficit, you'll be burning fat even if you aren't eating the "right" amount of food, at the "right" times of day, or if your food isn't the healthiest.

    Some people find it easier to be in a deficit when they're doing the things above. That would be the reason to do those things -- if they make your life easier. Your metabolism will work all day regardless of your meal quantity or timing.

    Obviously there are additional considerations for people recovering from an ED. There is a psychological component to meal quantity and timing in those situations and your treatment team is the best guide. But just for the purposes of weight management, individuals will do best adopting the quantity and timing that best supports them meeting their calorie goal.

    I No longer have an eating disorder
  • ashleygroizard
    ashleygroizard Posts: 181 Member
    kenyonhaff wrote: »
    I agree that a healthy body is going to be ready and giving you cues to eat every few hours.

    That Quora post is a mess in general, though.


    But yeah, eating every 3-5 hours is the "normal" thing for most people based on a healthy functioning endocrine and digestive system.

    Some people have schedules based on lifestyle and/or medical reasons that require them to eat at other intervals and that's okay too for most people.

    If you're in recovery from an eating disorder, it probably is best to schedule regular feeds using a percentage of your daily calories and macros in each one. Eating disorders are more about anxiety and poor coping and letting that get out of control. It's a psychological disorder.

    I disagree eating disorders are not because of anxiety and poor coping skills at all. It’s a weight loss obsession that can and does lead to death

    A lot of things contribute to eating disorders...including contact with Western civilization, anxiety, poor social skills, a parent with body or food issues, normalizing by peers, etc. That can lead to a weight loss obsession in eating disorders.

    It's a fine difference, but a difference. No one is born with alcoholism-- it's an illness in which biology, environment, culture, and more contribute to the actual disorder that can occur.

    I am not going to argue over what causes eating disorders as only the professionals in that area know for sure why each individual has a eating disorder.