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Lower cholesterol diet plan

swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
I need a plan for a no fat no cholesterol diet. Anyone have any ideas?
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Replies

  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member Posts: 1,282 Member Member Posts: 1,282 Member
    Zero fat or less saturated fat to lower cholesterol and LDL?

    You can track grams of saturated fat in MFP ..

    My fam members watching their cholesterol focus on fish, lean poultry & vegetables.

    They also include apples - good source of pectin and steel cut oat meal for beta glucans. (Absorbs cholesterol in intestines.)

    They didn’t cut out fat completely though. Good luck!
  • diana_k_smithdiana_k_smith Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    Focus on non animal protein sources, and fruits and vegetables. (+ carbs as needed). I have to eat this way to manage cholesterol so I'm not pushing veganism from an ethical stand-point, but vegan food has no cholesterol (fruits, veg, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, soymilk, etc). My doctor specifically said low saturated fats as that effects cholesterol so you should watch out for that (some vegan food still has minimal amounts of saturated fats - like Peanut Butter, Coconuts, etc).
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 984 Member Member Posts: 984 Member
    Abstract

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. For years, dietary cholesterol was implicated in increasing blood cholesterol levels leading to the elevated risk of CVD. To date, extensive research did not show evidence to support a role of dietary cholesterol in the development of CVD. As a result, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans removed the recommendations of restricting dietary cholesterol to 300 mg/day. This review summarizes the current literature regarding dietary cholesterol intake and CVD. It is worth noting that most foods that are rich in cholesterol are also high in saturated fatty acids and thus may increase the risk of CVD due to the saturated fatty acid content. The exceptions are eggs and shrimp. Considering that eggs are affordable and nutrient-dense food items, containing high-quality protein with minimal saturated fatty acids (1.56 gm/egg) and are rich in several micronutrients including vitamins and minerals, it would be worthwhile to include eggs in moderation as a part of a healthy eating pattern. This recommendation is particularly relevant when individual’s intakes of nutrients are suboptimal, or with limited income and food access, and to help ensure dietary intake of sufficient nutrients in growing children and older adults.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6024687/
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator
    What are you trying to achieve? As others stated dietary fat and cholesterol are essential nutrients. Overall, the biggest impact on metabolic markers is weight loss and exercise (especially weight training). I would also focus on lean proteins, plenty of fruits and veggies, a diet rich in healthy fats like fatty fish, avocado, olives/olive oils, seeds/nuts and whole grains. Limiting process foods can help too.
    edited May 2
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 543 Member Member Posts: 543 Member
    Did someone tell you you needed to do this, and if so, who? It's nearly impossible to eat no-fat, no cholesterol, not to mention unsatisfying. It's also not the way to go if trying to improve health markers, like blood pressure and blood cholesterol.

    In general, if you're looking for a specific heart-healthy diet, the DASH diet is generally regarded as nutritionally sound approach in doing so. It's not a weight loss diet, but a general approach to eating
  • swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Ty all for replies. Doctor said my levels are high and need to cut out the meat. I dont eat bad imo. Im just up the exercise and cut back some i suppose.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator
    Ty all for replies. Doctor said my levels are high and need to cut out the meat. I dont eat bad imo. Im just up the exercise and cut back some i suppose.

    Meat isn't the problem, especially lean meats. In fact, the latest meta analysis comapring levels of meat and fruit/vegetables consumption showed the diet highest in meat and fruit/veggie consumption provided slightly more favorable results vs just plants. Meat has essential nutrients in them and are more bioavailable in meat. Just focus on leaner meats, reduce processed meats, reduce full fat dairy, and increase seafood consumption.
  • swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Right on. Thankyou will do. I think the added exercise will help to. And im cutting out the sugary drinks. Which is hard for me cause i like soda.
  • JoDavo66JoDavo66 Member Posts: 336 Member Member Posts: 336 Member
    Ty all for replies. Doctor said my levels are high and need to cut out the meat. I dont eat bad imo. Im just up the exercise and cut back some i suppose.
    I worked for a GSK subsidiary with 2 heart related drugs, one which lowered triglycerides (another fat linked to CHD). At the time discovered I had naturally high cholesterol, family related, we discovered. My levels are better now than 30 years ago.
    We went veggie to cut out red meat initially now we eat white fish & salmon.
    Some excellent advice above.
    I went onto skimmed milk & polyunsaturated margarine etc.
    Extra virgin Olive Oil & Mediterranean diet is generally good.
    Some vegetarian products like soya & Quorn (TM) are good as high protein & the fat contained is minimal & "good" fats.
    Porridge Oats great at lowering cholesterol.
    In UK you can get products like margarine & yoghurts with Benecol (TM) which is a natural plant sterol (from which statins are based). I got mine down a few more points by taking Plant Sterol Tablets for 2 months. I would recommend you check this out with a Pharmacist for further advice rather than go off my own experience.
    If you don't know where to start: then Dietitian appt who can tailor recommendations to your personal circumstances.
  • swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Thankyou for taking time to reply to me. Im going to start on the fish and reduce the red meats. As far as milk and butter go i dont like either of those so that isnt an issue there. But i really like sour cream and cheese and i completely cut those out now. And im now drinking sparkling water instead of soda, the carbonation helps with not drinking soda so i hope this all sticks with me and i can be more healthy and drop some weight.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator
    Thankyou for taking time to reply to me. Im going to start on the fish and reduce the red meats. As far as milk and butter go i dont like either of those so that isnt an issue there. But i really like sour cream and cheese and i completely cut those out now. And im now drinking sparkling water instead of soda, the carbonation helps with not drinking soda so i hope this all sticks with me and i can be more healthy and drop some weight.

    How is your fruit and veggie consumption?
  • DaFibbleDaFibble Member Posts: 151 Member Member Posts: 151 Member
    Sounds like you've already made some significant steps towards improving your cholesterol.

    If you can stomach it, or just slowly tip the balance towards it, a plant-based diet is very good for cutting out cholesterol unless you put coconut oil in stuff. Avoid that and you should see improvements quite quickly. (Perhaps more meaningful to say a plant, fruit and fungus-based diet is very good).

    In addition to avoiding cholesterol, there are a bunch of things you can eat that reduce bad cholesterol. Some of them are mentioned here.

    You can cut fat too but some foods need a bit of healthy fat in order for their nutrients to be better absorbed. I recommend reading about nutrition science while you're working on your goals, although fair warning it's a difficult branch of science to approach since there are so many vested interests from the food industry that skew studies in their favour.
  • swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Well starting a couple days ago, i have UPed my fruit and veggie, i eat quite a bit of carrots, and fruit i eat apples, bananas, oranges, canteloupe.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 37,369 MFP Moderator
    Well starting a couple days ago, i have UPed my fruit and veggie, i eat quite a bit of carrots, and fruit i eat apples, bananas, oranges, canteloupe.

    Thats good. Things that can also be helpful in getting fiber are avocado/guacamole, chia seeds, cruciferous vegetables, and berries. Berries are especially great since they are very low in calories and high in volume.

    And you can be creative... Here is a chia pudding.

    ykog2s8p1l2l.jpg
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Member Posts: 4,419 Member Member Posts: 4,419 Member
    Reducing saturated fat intake will help but you don’t need to reduce healthy fat intake. Saturated fat is essentially fat from meat and dairy. Some fat in the diet is healthy. Omega 3s from wild salmon, for instance, olive oil, avocado, and nuts.

    Increase produce consumption. Some particular foods that are known to have benefits on cholesterol levels are walnuts, oatmeal, apples, pears, anything with soluble fiber.

    Increase exercise as well.
  • swilder0486swilder0486 Member Posts: 6 Member Member Posts: 6 Member
    Ya thats what im shooting towards. Not a fan of avocado though. What im struggling with now is creating a breakfast and lunch plan. Dinners im going to eat salmon twice a week with veggies and brown rice. Then chicken with veggies. Then i run out of ideas. I like fruits but cannot eat them all the time or i feel sick. Dont care a whole lot about nuts either. So kinda at a stump.
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 984 Member Member Posts: 984 Member
    It is so optimistic that people think that bad blood cholesterol can be fixed by eating these horrible diets. It gives hope I suppose.


    Abstract

    Background: Dietary cholesterol has been suggested to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which has led to US recommendations to reduce cholesterol intake.

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of dietary cholesterol on CVD risk in healthy adults by using systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Design: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, and Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau Abstracts databases were searched through December 2013 for prospective studies that quantified dietary cholesterol. Investigators independently screened citations and verified extracted data on study and participant characteristics, outcomes, and quality. Random-effect models meta-analysis was used when at least 3 studies reported the same CVD outcome.

    Results: Forty studies (17 cohorts in 19 publications with 361,923 subjects and 19 trials in 21 publications with 632 subjects) published between 1979 and 2013 were eligible for review. Dietary cholesterol was not statistically significantly associated with any coronary artery disease (4 cohorts; no summary RR), ischemic stroke (4 cohorts; summary RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.28), or hemorrhagic stroke (3 cohorts; summary RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.50). Dietary cholesterol statistically significantly increased both serum total cholesterol (17 trials; net change: 11.2 mg/dL; 95% CI: 6.4, 15.9) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (14 trials; net change: 6.7 mg/dL; 95% CI: 1.7, 11.7 mg/dL). Increases in LDL cholesterol were no longer statistically significant when intervention doses exceeded 900 mg/d. Dietary cholesterol also statistically significantly increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (13 trials; net change: 3.2 mg/dL; 95% CI: 0.9, 9.7 mg/dL) and the LDL to high-density lipoprotein ratio (5 trials; net change: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.0, 0.3). Dietary cholesterol did not statistically significantly change serum triglycerides or very-low-density lipoprotein concentrations.

    Conclusion: Reviewed studies were heterogeneous and lacked the methodologic rigor to draw any conclusions regarding the effects of dietary cholesterol on CVD risk. Carefully adjusted and well-conducted cohort studies would be useful to identify the relative effects of dietary cholesterol on CVD risk.
    edited May 3
  • DaFibbleDaFibble Member Posts: 151 Member Member Posts: 151 Member
    It is so optimistic that people think that bad blood cholesterol can be fixed by eating these horrible diets. It gives hope I suppose.

    Optimism isn't required when the balance of scientific evidence strongly suggests something is so.

    That paper you posted was from the American Society for Nutrition. Not a good source, given the companies that fund them and their track record of misleading information. Beware of science paid for by companies that produce highly processed foods, minimally nutritious foods and biotech giants.

    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/food-matters/science-for-sale-big-food-s-influence-on-top-nutrition-research-org/
    edited May 3
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