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Chestnut mushrooms

mariakershaw123mariakershaw123 Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
I’m really confused, the site says that chestnut mushrooms have a calorific value of 160kcal for 100g and 20g fat, this doesn’t correspond with other sites I’ve looked up

Replies

  • cmriversidecmriverside Member Posts: 31,255 Member Member Posts: 31,255 Member
    Foods are entered by users, and that one you are seeing may have been a "prepared" item.

    If you can't find an entry that is close enough, just create a new food.

    Here's the How To from "Help"

    https://support.myfitnesspal.com/hc/en-us/articles/360032271992-How-do-I-log-a-food-that-is-not-in-the-database-

  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member
    If you're talking about a database entry that you found, that's not the site's official opinion, it's just an entry created by another user. You're right that it is unlikely that mushrooms have that calorie and fat content -- it's likely the person who made the entry was referring to a prepared version that includes added fat like oil or butter (or they may just be completely mistaken).
  • socajamsocajam Member, Premium Posts: 2,577 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,577 Member
    I never ever take the entry that's in the food database
    I look up the food and check, if the entry does not have the same calories, then I would make changes to the food
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,689 Member Member Posts: 8,689 Member
    If you're talking about a database entry that you found, that's not the site's official opinion, it's just an entry created by another user. You're right that it is unlikely that mushrooms have that calorie and fat content -- it's likely the person who made the entry was referring to a prepared version that includes added fat like oil or butter (or they may just be completely mistaken).

    Or chestnuts?
    I had never heard this term for what I think of as white mushroom, cremini, or portobello, depending on color and maturity, so at first I thought maybe it was some kind of dish someone made that included both chestnuts and mushrooms (160 kcal per 100 g seems low for chestnuts, and high for mushrooms, so a food that has both seems reasonable). For example, I can imagine some putting both chestnuts and mushrooms in stuffing/dressing.

    OP, as others have said, you need to check entries, since they're user-entered, including the name of the food, and not everyone is going to put in enough info to clearly identify the product. You can improve your chances of finding an accurate entry for whole foods like mushrooms by finding the exact string used in the USDA nutrient database, which was imported to the MFP database years ago (by staff, not by users). Or at least learn the general conventions, so you can guess that it's probably "mushrooms, raw" that you want to search for.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member
    If you're talking about a database entry that you found, that's not the site's official opinion, it's just an entry created by another user. You're right that it is unlikely that mushrooms have that calorie and fat content -- it's likely the person who made the entry was referring to a prepared version that includes added fat like oil or butter (or they may just be completely mistaken).

    Or chestnuts?
    I had never heard this term for what I think of as white mushroom, cremini, or portobello, depending on color and maturity, so at first I thought maybe it was some kind of dish someone made that included both chestnuts and mushrooms (160 kcal per 100 g seems low for chestnuts, and high for mushrooms, so a food that has both seems reasonable). For example, I can imagine some putting both chestnuts and mushrooms in stuffing/dressing.

    OP, as others have said, you need to check entries, since they're user-entered, including the name of the food, and not everyone is going to put in enough info to clearly identify the product. You can improve your chances of finding an accurate entry for whole foods like mushrooms by finding the exact string used in the USDA nutrient database, which was imported to the MFP database years ago (by staff, not by users). Or at least learn the general conventions, so you can guess that it's probably "mushrooms, raw" that you want to search for.

    A chestnut mushroom is what some people call the browner variety of the regular white button mushroom. I don't think it's actually different in any nutritional way, so I'd just use the entry for a regular white button mushroom.

    But apart from that, it COULD also be the description of a dish someone made that combined mushrooms and chestnuts . . . that actually sounds tasty!
  • mariakershaw123mariakershaw123 Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
    Thank you very much to you all
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