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What are the number one foods to eat to not feel hungry?

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  • FiberousJFiberousJ Member Posts: 26 Member Member Posts: 26 Member
    Soup.....lots of low calorie vegetable soup!


    Nice idea. I'll note that in my journal.
  • FiberousJFiberousJ Member Posts: 26 Member Member Posts: 26 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    I agree that you need to be well nourished in all the nutrients in order to feel satisfied.

    So...do that. That is my suggestion. If I eat a well balanced three meals with the right combination of Protein, Fats, and Carbs and I am getting enough iron, magnesium, potassium, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber, then I'm good. If I'm lacking something my brain will tell me to keep eating.

    A varied plan is the best. Nuts, legumes, a wide variety of whole fruit and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein including fish and dairy.

    I make it a goal to get 800g of fruit or vegetables every day. Start there. Lots of different ones. Apples are good, but what about berries, melons, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, celery, carrots, bananas, broccoli and cauliflower, etc.? I have an apple maybe once a week and the rest of the time I'm busy trying to get a variety of other plants.



    Interesting. I agree. Now, if I'm feeling a little hungry later at night, what do you think is the number one snack I can eat that still gives me all the nutrients, but prevents me from a binge? I heard dark chocolate was great. However, there's a problem with dark chocolate. I can't really stop eating it, so that defeats the purpose.

    I'm not being snarky here, but if it's late at night - could you just go to bed? If I stay up later than I should I get hungry. One of the reasons I like logging so much is that it gives me another metric to go by besides my feelings. I feel like eating (or felt, since over time this has been less of an issue) when really, I'm just bored, or tired, or thirsty, or I want something to do with my hands, or other people around me are eating, or even just "I always eat now." I don't think eating for pleasure is bad, but I do know that I have to be careful about letting my emotions do all the steering. If I ate enough that day, and I know I ate enough, then sometimes I do just tell myself, "no." And it doesn't kill me, and I get to eat breakfast in the morning.



    Well, I've had a hard time going to bed for years. However, ever since I started taking more fiber, I am eating much less at night. Instead of eating a whole plate of food, I'm only snacking on a couple of hundred calories, and then it has helped me go to sleep. If I have nothing, I can't fall asleep cuz I'm craving some energy very badly. Not doing too bad though, I've been working out 3 to 4 hours on most days, so I have the ambition. Have lost 2 shirt sizes in the pandemic. Just wanna speed it up and have very little appetite like a skinny person.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    I wish I had an answer. My stomach is currently full, but my head is saying 'feed me sweets!'. Sometimes I give in.
    Sometimes I tell my brain to shut up and do all those things we've all heard a million times (drink iced water/clean teeth/have a 'treat' drink like chocolate mint (the plant) and boiling water...)
    Sometimes sleep helps.
    Sometimes hormones make it worse. And stress. And exercise at the wrong time. And, and, and...
    I'm coming to the conclusion there's going to be no magic bullet, just as there's really no magically skinny peeps. They may SAY they have a fast metabolism, or 'forget' to eat... but those are just like my 'sometimes'.
    Bodies need fuel. Brains get confused or addicted or habit laden.
    We are more than either.
    I'm not saying 'stop making excuses ', cos the struggle is real. But I guess I am saying... we determine what course of action is right for this given moment. If I'm hungry, I should eat. If I'm bored/habit etc, I should find another hobby/distraction. I choose.


    Right. So maybe it's about habits and developing distractions. However, distractions might only work once in a while. It's not a bulletproof strategy either. So I'm thinking that it may have to do more with habits.

    And I'm coming to the conclusion that going on extreme diets is not sustainable. Eventually, our bodies fight back and need the calories.

    Also, I'm starting to realize if you just be consistent, it's okay to slip up. It's not about what we do in one day, but what we did for that week or that month or that year.

    And patience is a virtue too. Part of the reason I work out so much is so that I'm not reliant on just one way. I don't care if it's a 90 percent diet or an 80 percent diet. 10 to 20 percent is still part of the puzzle. I don't necessarily find that exercise makes me hungrier. It makes me eat back some of the calories but not all of them.

    But right now I have a journal and I'm , writing down what's working and what's not. I've actually lost about 30 pounds in the pandemic. I'm wearing new clothes. But I'm not happy, I've actually lost confidence because I feel it's not enough. I still need to lose at least 15 more pounds.

    I think you're on the right track here.

    I do think a lot of it is about establishing habits and expectations about eating and exercise, and grooving those in until they're pretty automatic. To *some* extent, the body may follow behavior (not simply lead it), with respect to things like cravings.

    IMO, beyond that, part of the issue with what I think you're calling "brain hunger" is figuring out when and especially *why* it occurs. If it's not physical need for calories or nutrition, what is it? For example, there can be elements like a need for comfort, pleasure, stimulation (anti-boredom), reassurance, etc., or a need to combat fatigue, damp down emotions, counter stress, distract ourselves, etc.

    For some problems that manifest as "hunger", food is not the solution, because food is not the actual root cause.

    I can't say whether that's happening for you, but it's a thing that happens for some. If it is happening, figuring out the cause and working on it directly (not indirectly by looking for filling ways to eat) may be the solution.

    Keep in mind that though exercise as good, and we need some for best health (it's like food in those ways), it can also be something we use as a sort of placebo to paper over other problems. Don't get me wrong, I like exercise, think it has many benefits, and that the only "too much" is exercising beyond current safe limits or so much that it throws off overall good life balance (enough time and energy for job, family, nuturing social relationships, faith/spiritual activities for some, non-exercise hobbies, etc.).


    You mentioned combatting fatigue. At times yes, my brain does feel a bit fatigued. And when I have chocolate or something starchy like crackers, I usually feel energized again. What can give me the same boost that doesn't contain calories?

    If fatigue is causing cravings, you want to be seeking strategies to reduce the fatigue, not ways to get a boost after it's already happened. Try to find and work on the root causes, don't try to treat the symptoms, basically.

    Stress can increase fatigue, are there any stress reduction options available to you, beyond what you're already doing? Note that if you're losing weight aggressively fast, or exercising really a lot (in relation to your current fitness level), that those are stressors, too.
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    I agree that you need to be well nourished in all the nutrients in order to feel satisfied.

    So...do that. That is my suggestion. If I eat a well balanced three meals with the right combination of Protein, Fats, and Carbs and I am getting enough iron, magnesium, potassium, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber, then I'm good. If I'm lacking something my brain will tell me to keep eating.

    A varied plan is the best. Nuts, legumes, a wide variety of whole fruit and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein including fish and dairy.

    I make it a goal to get 800g of fruit or vegetables every day. Start there. Lots of different ones. Apples are good, but what about berries, melons, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, celery, carrots, bananas, broccoli and cauliflower, etc.? I have an apple maybe once a week and the rest of the time I'm busy trying to get a variety of other plants.



    Interesting. I agree. Now, if I'm feeling a little hungry later at night, what do you think is the number one snack I can eat that still gives me all the nutrients, but prevents me from a binge? I heard dark chocolate was great. However, there's a problem with dark chocolate. I can't really stop eating it, so that defeats the purpose.

    I'm not being snarky here, but if it's late at night - could you just go to bed? If I stay up later than I should I get hungry. One of the reasons I like logging so much is that it gives me another metric to go by besides my feelings. I feel like eating (or felt, since over time this has been less of an issue) when really, I'm just bored, or tired, or thirsty, or I want something to do with my hands, or other people around me are eating, or even just "I always eat now." I don't think eating for pleasure is bad, but I do know that I have to be careful about letting my emotions do all the steering. If I ate enough that day, and I know I ate enough, then sometimes I do just tell myself, "no." And it doesn't kill me, and I get to eat breakfast in the morning.



    Well, I've had a hard time going to bed for years. However, ever since I started taking more fiber, I am eating much less at night. Instead of eating a whole plate of food, I'm only snacking on a couple of hundred calories, and then it has helped me go to sleep. If I have nothing, I can't fall asleep cuz I'm craving some energy very badly. Not doing too bad though, I've been working out 3 to 4 hours on most days, so I have the ambition. Have lost 2 shirt sizes in the pandemic. Just wanna speed it up and have very little appetite like a skinny person.

    Working on improving your sleep can also improve the fatigue, potentially affect cravings. It sounds like you're making progress on that front, but if you can make further progress there, it may help.

    I hate to say it, but I don't think there is a "speed this up" option. It's a series of interlocking puzzles to be solved, and in some cases you're talking about needing to replace less-productive very long term habits with new ones, and get your body used to the new habits. That's unlikely to be a speedy process. Further, some things we might try to do to make it go faster - like cutting calories too aggressively, or doing exercise substantially in excess of our current fitness level - can be counter-productive, triggering more cravings that might persist longer.
  • karahm78karahm78 Member Posts: 489 Member Member Posts: 489 Member
    I HAVE to have variety of flavors and textures to feel satisfied... example if I eat a Lean Cuisine for lunch I’m starving in an hour, but if I add some steam fresh broccoli, some raspberries, and a sugar free jello cup I am set until dinner with only like 100 additional calories. So it isn’t macros for me but variety.

    I also loosely IF, meaning I skip breakfast except for coffee. I’m naturally not a big eater in the AM so coffee is all I need. Gives me more calories later in the day so my dinner is more satisfying or I splurge on a glass of wine or some chocolate.

    Find a way that satisfies you... or it won’t last. It’s like solving the da Vinci code lol.
  • scarlett_kscarlett_k Member Posts: 640 Member Member Posts: 640 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    I agree that you need to be well nourished in all the nutrients in order to feel satisfied.

    So...do that. That is my suggestion. If I eat a well balanced three meals with the right combination of Protein, Fats, and Carbs and I am getting enough iron, magnesium, potassium, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber, then I'm good. If I'm lacking something my brain will tell me to keep eating.

    A varied plan is the best. Nuts, legumes, a wide variety of whole fruit and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein including fish and dairy.

    I make it a goal to get 800g of fruit or vegetables every day. Start there. Lots of different ones. Apples are good, but what about berries, melons, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, celery, carrots, bananas, broccoli and cauliflower, etc.? I have an apple maybe once a week and the rest of the time I'm busy trying to get a variety of other plants.



    Interesting. I agree. Now, if I'm feeling a little hungry later at night, what do you think is the number one snack I can eat that still gives me all the nutrients, but prevents me from a binge? I heard dark chocolate was great. However, there's a problem with dark chocolate. I can't really stop eating it, so that defeats the purpose.

    A boiled egg works for me although I'm not sure it'll give you "all the nutrients", eggs are certainly nutritious.
  • southkonahisouthkonahi Member Posts: 105 Member Member Posts: 105 Member
    crb426 wrote: »
    Most skinny people do actively work at being skinny. They make choices to eat the way they do. It just becomes a habit to live the way that keeps them skinny.
    I do agree with that. I was skinny up until my 40s. But I worked on watching my calorie intake constantly. For example, I'd avoid adding cheese (calories), I'd avoid sugary drinks (calories), I'd avoid extra calories from too many liquor-drinks, or I'd choose liquor-drinks without added sugar, I'd avoid all sorts of things (calories) in order to keep the pounds off.
    One of the things I am working on now is to be more constantly aware of my calorie intake, and watching for times throughout the day that I avoid extra calories. It's a mindset that I need to reestablish for myself.

  • WithywarlockWithywarlock Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
    My go-to is a Granny Smith green apple. They're too tart to eat quickly, meaning that each bite is spaced out. Plus I like them that much I try to get every edible bit out of it I can. Failing that, not so much what I eat but what I drink. It's not particularly healthy but chocolate milk is highly satisfying, and failing that, water. The key thing for me to recognise is the difference between hunger, a craving, and just when I want to put something in my mouth (ooh matron) because of old habits.
  • penguinmama87penguinmama87 Member, Premium Posts: 387 Member Member, Premium Posts: 387 Member
    I think a piece of fruit or a glass of milk (warm, maybe, if that's your thing) would work well before bed. 100-200 calories depending on how much there is, fairly easy on the stomach, possibly a soporific effect too with the milk. I don't think there's anything wrong with eating before bed, and people come up with schedules that work for them, so I would just plan for that snack then if that's something that works for you. White knuckling it through the day and then downing a bunch of calories at bedtime would be a sure recipe for nightmares/bizarro-dreams in my case.

    Handling the insomnia will probably be a part of this whole thing, too. All of these things go together, and it takes time to figure out how and to make it workable. You might try a few things and find it doesn't work, and that's OK too. Make small changes at a time, try them on for a few weeks or a month, and then assess again.

    Re: skinny people: My husband is quite thin. I have thought about this a lot with him, because I've always weighed more than him even when I was at normal weight. He likes to eat, but he does not like food as much as I do. I move more and exercise more than he does, but until I started losing weight I ate more than him every day. When I am a normal weight I fully expect to still eat more than him, but that will also be counterbalanced by me doing more exercise! He doesn't consciously stop himself from eating, or decide that he will stop even though he'd rather keep going. He just honestly doesn't care about it that much. I find that baffling, because food tastes *so good* to me.

    On the other hand, he can lie down and nap pretty much anytime, and I can't do that at all. He finds it very difficult to motivate himself to get up and do things that need doing. On the other hand, I can't stand lying down if I'm not reading or if it's not bedtime. If I see something out of place, I have to get up and fix it. Or I think about my to-do list and want to get it done if I have a minute. I think that's just another tendency that comes down to personality and inclinations. You can work on inclinations, of course, through discipline, but I don't think, necessarily, that *all* skinny people are inherently more virtuous or disciplined about food. For many of them, it just may not pose the same level of temptation.

    (I will reassess this idea as we get older, because I do have a suspicion that weight gain may catch up to my husband one day. We're still in our thirties and are chasing after babies and toddlers. In our forties and fifties when they're older, if he's still not doing much regular activity and still at his mostly sedentary job? We'll see!)
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,849 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,849 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    This is the problem with a lot of people. Including me. We want to limit our calories and we try really hard. But just because you can count, doesn't mean that you're gonna be able to do it, if you have issues with your brain signaling hunger.

    However.. why is it that people that have always been skinny and never worked out, never seem to be super hungry? Is it genetic? Do they have special hormones? Is it because their intestines are smaller? I'm really trying to figure this out. It's simply a matter of them making the choice to not eat as much. They aren't even aware.

    So I started eating an apple before a meal. It does work somewhat well. It definitely makes my stomach full. But sometimes, my stomach will feel full but my brain needs something. And so eating fiber does help a little bit. I also do eat veggies, but again, they are not a magic bullet. They help satiate you a little bit. But how can we get it to the point where we don't crave food at all? Yes, water helps a little too. Yes, protein helps a little too. And yes fat helps too, however, the trade-off is that I'm eating more calories short term when I eat fat, so it's hard to say if it's worth it.

    Do you see? I wish it was as easy as refueling your car. When you put gas in the tank, your brain is not craving more and more gas. People that shame others for having a hard time losing weight, don't understand that for some people it's a little bit harder to get full in their brains.

    I just wish there was a food or supplement that could truly, truly regulate your appetite to the point where maybe you still crave enough to eat, but you don't want to eat that much. Fiber, water, protein, and fat only help so much.

    Of course, I've tried things like l glutamine, gaba, or chromium. Don't feel anything. Right now I'm trying to start my day off with eggs, as I heard that helps. Who knows. I would do anything to figure this all out.

    The good news is I have figured out how to make my stomach less hungry. That is through water and fiber. And some protein. It does work. Although sometimes, my stomach will feel so full, that it just makes me want food more because I'm paying attention. But most of the time it does work. I've significantly reduced my nighttime cravings. That's a good start.

    So I've pretty much solved my stomach hunger. I think that's a win. Now, how do I solve my brain hunger? Yes, I take vitamins and omega 3s and all that. But perhaps someone may know something.

    Do you see? My post is meant to be meaningful because I'm trying to get to the root of this. I'm not denying calorie in vs calorie out. But I'm trying to go deeper than that to figure out what causes cravings and what are the most non BS ways to deal with them. Advice is welcome, but please do not be one of those people who just say, ''Stop making excuses.''
    It's really one reason.....................HABITUAL BEHAVIOR. Go to countries like Vietnam or Thailand. The behavior is NOT to eat a lot.
    In other industrialized countries, especially where people are heavy, social behaviors usually dictate weight of individuals.
    If you're trying to reduce cravings, then it's anecdotal for many but pickles seem to do the trick. Low cal and the pickle juice seems to stave of cravings for many. Again, this is anecdotal. I don't have any links that show a study proving this.
    But because behavior takes time to change, many have a hard time. Personally I don't eat in the AM hours and have my first meal after 12pm and eat up to 11pm at night where after dinner I snack on my cravings food. Hence no cravings.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • crb426crb426 Member Posts: 558 Member Member Posts: 558 Member
    You mentioned combatting fatigue. At times yes, my brain does feel a bit fatigued. And when I have chocolate or something starchy like crackers, I usually feel energized again. What can give me the same boost that doesn't contain calories?

    For me, exercise makes me feel more energetic. A good workout in the morning gives me a "buzz" for most of the day. Bonus, by the end of the day I am exhausted and fall asleep a lot more easily.

    Just pay attention to make sure your fatigue is not because you ate too few calories that day.
    edited May 5
  • JulieH70517JulieH70517 Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
    I have a condition where if I drink alcohol my body processes it quickly. If I drink 1/2 a beer or mixed drink, feels like I had 3 full drinks. Had to stop drinking alcohol 20+ years ago. Now I was thinking, maybe that is what's happening with food. I can eat a balanced meal, about 350-400 calories and in less than an hour feels like I did not eat anything. Makes me go hummmm.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,850 Member Member Posts: 23,850 Member
    You mentioned combatting fatigue. At times yes, my brain does feel a bit fatigued. And when I have chocolate or something starchy like crackers, I usually feel energized again. What can give me the same boost that doesn't contain calories?
    crb426 wrote: »
    For me, exercise makes me feel more energetic. A good workout in the morning gives me a "buzz" for most of the day. Bonus, by the end of the day I am exhausted and fall asleep a lot more easily.

    Just pay attention to make sure your fatigue is not because you ate too few calories that day.

    Another vote for exercise earlier in the day. I lost my job last year, but previously worked hard to create the habit of exercising at lunch time. This and a balanced lunch would prevent afternoon crashes and munchies, and make me more productive at work and through the evening.

    Good point about under-eating causing fatigue.

    Also, if lack of sleep is the issue, get more sleep. This may sound super obvious, but I personally have to work very hard at my sleep hygiene in order to ensure a good night's sleep, all the way down to what I read to get back to sleep if I've awakened in the middle of the night - it must be interesting, but not super engaging, which would keep me up. Rereads are best for me (if I remember what happened.) I can get to Wikipedia from my Kindle, and have often fallen back asleep to that. My ear plugs must be just right, etc., etc. I'm the Goldilocks of Sleep Hygiene, lol.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,850 Member Member Posts: 23,850 Member
    FiberousJ wrote: »
    I agree that you need to be well nourished in all the nutrients in order to feel satisfied.

    So...do that. That is my suggestion. If I eat a well balanced three meals with the right combination of Protein, Fats, and Carbs and I am getting enough iron, magnesium, potassium, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber, then I'm good. If I'm lacking something my brain will tell me to keep eating.

    A varied plan is the best. Nuts, legumes, a wide variety of whole fruit and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein including fish and dairy.

    I make it a goal to get 800g of fruit or vegetables every day. Start there. Lots of different ones. Apples are good, but what about berries, melons, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, celery, carrots, bananas, broccoli and cauliflower, etc.? I have an apple maybe once a week and the rest of the time I'm busy trying to get a variety of other plants.

    Interesting. I agree. Now, if I'm feeling a little hungry later at night, what do you think is the number one snack I can eat that still gives me all the nutrients, but prevents me from a binge? I heard dark chocolate was great. However, there's a problem with dark chocolate. I can't really stop eating it, so that defeats the purpose.

    I absolutely cannot moderate chocolate BARS, but can moderate chocolate CHIPS or the 50-70 calorie Ghirardelli squares.

    A mini meal without fruits or veggies (because of the water content and my tiny bladder) works well for me as a bed time snack. For example, a small tortilla wrap (the 70 calorie ones) plus chicken or tuna) followed by my Ghirardelli square. Protein right before bed appears to be helpful for me. I get sufficient fiber earlier in the day and find this really helpful.

    What's your fiber goal and how well do you hit it? I thought mine was 25 but recently realized it was only 21. I upped it to 25 and plan to up it again soon.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,850 Member Member Posts: 23,850 Member
    I have a condition where if I drink alcohol my body processes it quickly. If I drink 1/2 a beer or mixed drink, feels like I had 3 full drinks. Had to stop drinking alcohol 20+ years ago. Now I was thinking, maybe that is what's happening with food. I can eat a balanced meal, about 350-400 calories and in less than an hour feels like I did not eat anything. Makes me go hummmm.

    My breakfast is 300 calories but it includes 11 grams of fiber, which is a lot for that few calories.

    What's your fiber goal and how well do you hit it most days?

    I'm hungrier at dinner time, and plan for over 500 calories for that, but I can get away with one in the 400s if it looks like 100 g cooked chicken breast, 100 g cooked broccoli, 120 g potato, and a little fat. I need the protein from the chicken, bulk and fiber from the broc, and satiety from the potatoes and possibly fat. (I love fat but don't find it especially satiating.)

    Do experiment with what macro mix works best to fill you up. Some people are satisfied while eating vegan and some while eating keto, which have vastly different macro mixes and amount of bulk.
  • JulieH70517JulieH70517 Member Posts: 5 Member Member Posts: 5 Member
    Thanks for the info kshama2001. I don't have a fiber goal or keep track of anything other than calories. I'll have to start a hunger chart and see if it's the same depending on what I eat.
  • meeppeepneepmeeppeepneep Member Posts: 41 Member Member Posts: 41 Member
    I don't have a problem with hunger now, but I do still have a problem that my brain wants fat and carbs, mostly in the form of pastries and chocolate, and crisps. That in combination with me doing "intermittent fasting" and I ended up eating way to much (because I hadn't eaten all day I could eat an entire pizza! and cookies, and soda, and...). Training myself to actually eat normal meals took a long time and I still eat more in the afternoon because that is when I have most free time and have time to want food.

    My solution was to buy stupid expensive and delicious ice-cream. And I could have a bowl of it for dessert if I kept to a healthy diet for the rest of the day. That and setting up a strict food budget and not going to the store everyday so that I didn't have the chance to "accidentally" get a family pack of crisps because it was on offer.
  • lorib642lorib642 Member Posts: 1,754 Member Member Posts: 1,754 Member
    I find the full feeling from fat is worth the tradeoff for calories, I can drink coffee with cream and be content all morning. i like veggies with cream cheese.

    I watched a show on "naturally slim" people. The people they followed ate more home cooked meals that were not high calorie. They were active (one was real fidgety). They would splurge once in a while but the calories over the week were maintenance, When they ate they sat down and made it a meal.
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Member Posts: 3,080 Member Member Posts: 3,080 Member
    I will usually eat a snack at night since I eat dinner at 6 pm and go to bed around 1 a.m. A banana or half an apple and a slice of cheese work well for me. Sometimes I'll do a grapefruit or orange or a slice of wheat bread and butter. If I don't eat at night when I'm hungry, I won't sleep. Two or three hours later I'll get up and be absolutely starving, so I've learned to listen to the hunger cues that hit at 10 or 11:00.

    Family teaches us initially how to eat. I was raised to eat very large portions, thanks to overweight parents and older brothers, and usually to eat seconds. We also always had dessert after dinner and usually with lunch, plus mid-afternoon snacks. I learned to cut down my portions and to skip eating seconds, but i still have a sweet tooth. I usually have dessert. That's fine when I include it in my plans for the day. The hard part was learning to resist the voice that wants a donut in the middle of the afternoon or a blueberry muffin or some other utterly unnecessary treat. I've learned to just put it off. I don't tell myself I can never have the donut, I do say I'll have it another day when I've got some extra calories from a hard workout, or I'll have it instead of my breakfast cereal or peanut butter sandwich for lunch. I'm a master procrastinator and that works to keep my extra treats to one every few weeks instead of the one almost every day I was doing when I was gaining weight.
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