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Dumb question - moving barbell from squat rack to floor

lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
I hope this is not a dumb question but I just started furnishing my home gym and started Stronglifts 5x5. I set up a squat stand and purchased a bar and some plates. I am still lifting very low weight but even so, I am finding it not so easy to get the bar off and back on the squat level arms to do the deadlifts. I am imagining this will get progressively more difficult as I lift heavier weights.

My question is, do y'all have two bars or am I just missing a simpler way to get the bar on and off the arms of the squat stand?
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Replies

  • nossmfnossmf Member Posts: 1,322 Member Member Posts: 1,322 Member
    Part of the problem can be in the type of squat stand you have, as there are different models shaped differently. Can you post a picture of yours?
  • lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 498 Member Member, Premium Posts: 498 Member
    When you say you can’t get the bar off the rack - what exactly are you struggling with? Without sounding patronising, have you got the bar set too high? So if you unload the weights, you should be able to squat a little to get under it, hold it in your hands and rest it on your collar bones (a front squat position) then you should be able to stand up and step back so it comes away from the rack. Then gently lower it to the floor and reload your weights. If it’s set too high then lifting it up can be tricky. Or have I got totally the wrong angle there?!
  • lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
    When you say you can’t get the bar off the rack - what exactly are you struggling with? Without sounding patronising, have you got the bar set too high? So if you unload the weights, you should be able to squat a little to get under it, hold it in your hands and rest it on your collar bones (a front squat position) then you should be able to stand up and step back so it comes away from the rack. Then gently lower it to the floor and reload your weights. If it’s set too high then lifting it up can be tricky. Or have I got totally the wrong angle there?!

    1 - I hadn't thought about resting it on my collar bones, I had been just trying to lift if with my hands/arms.
    2 - I guess I was trying to avoid the unloading and reloading weights repeatedly but I guess it is either that or get a second bar and I am not sure I want to spend the money there.
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    Until you can reliably clean the bar at the loaded weight it looks like you will just have to unload it to move it. The arms look too low to make a front racked squat feasible for lowering the bar. For raising the bar you'll need to clean it to the front rack position - I find this easiest to do by removing from the arms, stepping backwards and doing a hang clean so I can get momentum to raise the weight. Even so you'll be safer with an unloaded bar, especially towards the end of your session.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,319 Member Member Posts: 39,319 Member
    lmf1012 wrote: »
    I hope this is not a dumb question but I just started furnishing my home gym and started Stronglifts 5x5. I set up a squat stand and purchased a bar and some plates. I am still lifting very low weight but even so, I am finding it not so easy to get the bar off and back on the squat level arms to do the deadlifts. I am imagining this will get progressively more difficult as I lift heavier weights.

    My question is, do y'all have two bars or am I just missing a simpler way to get the bar on and off the arms of the squat stand?

    When you're moving the bar, you move it unloaded...you would then load it again for deadlifts. It's part of lifting...and also more exercise.

    If I'm doing front squats I can get it down and back up with a clean...but I can deadlift way more than I can clean so if I'm doing traditional back squats (also much more than I can front squat) I have to unload the barbell and load it back up to do my deads.
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 18,917 Member Member Posts: 18,917 Member
    But practicing those movements with an empty bar are still very functional and useful.
  • lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lmf1012 wrote: »
    I hope this is not a dumb question but I just started furnishing my home gym and started Stronglifts 5x5. I set up a squat stand and purchased a bar and some plates. I am still lifting very low weight but even so, I am finding it not so easy to get the bar off and back on the squat level arms to do the deadlifts. I am imagining this will get progressively more difficult as I lift heavier weights.

    My question is, do y'all have two bars or am I just missing a simpler way to get the bar on and off the arms of the squat stand?

    When you're moving the bar, you move it unloaded...you would then load it again for deadlifts. It's part of lifting...and also more exercise.

    If I'm doing front squats I can get it down and back up with a clean...but I can deadlift way more than I can clean so if I'm doing traditional back squats (also much more than I can front squat) I have to unload the barbell and load it back up to do my deads.

    Thanks, this makes sense and God knows I could use the extra exercise! I just did not want to be doing something that was unnecessary if there was something obvious I was missing.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,319 Member Member Posts: 39,319 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    But practicing those movements with an empty bar are still very functional and useful.

    Very true
  • GaryRunsGaryRuns Member, Premium Posts: 444 Member Member, Premium Posts: 444 Member
    lmf1012 wrote: »
    When you say you can’t get the bar off the rack - what exactly are you struggling with? Without sounding patronising, have you got the bar set too high? So if you unload the weights, you should be able to squat a little to get under it, hold it in your hands and rest it on your collar bones (a front squat position) then you should be able to stand up and step back so it comes away from the rack. Then gently lower it to the floor and reload your weights. If it’s set too high then lifting it up can be tricky. Or have I got totally the wrong angle there?!

    1 - I hadn't thought about resting it on my collar bones, I had been just trying to lift if with my hands/arms.
    2 - I guess I was trying to avoid the unloading and reloading weights repeatedly but I guess it is either that or get a second bar and I am not sure I want to spend the money there.

    You'll definitely reach a point where you have enough weight on the bar that you won't want to take a fully loaded bar off your squat j-hooks and drop it to your catches.

    On a side note, I'd say the majority of any injuries I've experienced in the gym weren't from performing lifts but from doing dumb things like trying to drop a fully loaded bar from the j-hooks for my squat down to the catches, or from smashing my fingers putting a plate back on the plate stand, or from not being careful with my back when bending over to pick up a plate. So being careful to unload the bar in order to safely drop it down where you need it is a good idea. That's something I'm surprised I haven't hurt myself trying! :D
    edited June 10
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 18,917 Member Member Posts: 18,917 Member
    @lmf1012

    Talking about this. Just the clean portion of it for getting it back up to squat or OHP height.




    Don't worry about hook grip, though it might be good prep for deadlifting heavier anyway.

    ETA - you can watch how they are lowering it without the dropping, which is the other part you'll want at home for now probably.
    edited June 10
  • AKTipsyCatAKTipsyCat Member, Premium Posts: 192 Member Member, Premium Posts: 192 Member
    Love the 5x5 Stronglifts program! I need to re-start doing it, I was doing so well and lost my lifting buddy, so I stopped doping it. Good luck. And yeah, loading and unloading the bar is the worse part of lifting - especially when you don't have someone to help with it, and you get into the heavier weights.
  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 498 Member Member, Premium Posts: 498 Member
    lmf1012 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lmf1012 wrote: »
    I hope this is not a dumb question but I just started furnishing my home gym and started Stronglifts 5x5. I set up a squat stand and purchased a bar and some plates. I am still lifting very low weight but even so, I am finding it not so easy to get the bar off and back on the squat level arms to do the deadlifts. I am imagining this will get progressively more difficult as I lift heavier weights.

    My question is, do y'all have two bars or am I just missing a simpler way to get the bar on and off the arms of the squat stand?

    When you're moving the bar, you move it unloaded...you would then load it again for deadlifts. It's part of lifting...and also more exercise.

    If I'm doing front squats I can get it down and back up with a clean...but I can deadlift way more than I can clean so if I'm doing traditional back squats (also much more than I can front squat) I have to unload the barbell and load it back up to do my deads.

    Thanks, this makes sense and God knows I could use the extra exercise! I just did not want to be doing something that was unnecessary if there was something obvious I was missing.

    Loading and unloading the bar can take an age but it’s all part of it 😀 then you get the fun of trying to do bar maths to calculate how much weight you need to add! Once you get used to it you will be able to get the bar rested on your collarbones and lower it to the floor with weight on it - it’s basically a reverse clean. But don’t try that until you’ve got more used to the bar, as overextending backwards to balance can hurt. (I do weightlifting which is basically clean & jerks and snatches but I still usually unload and then reload the bar for safety’s sake.) have fun - squats and deadlifts are great for you 👍
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 635 Member Member Posts: 635 Member
    GaryRuns wrote: »

    On a side note, I'd say the majority of any injuries I've experienced in the gym weren't from performing lifts but from doing dumb things like trying to drop a fully loaded bar from the j-hooks for my squat down to the catches, or from smashing my fingers putting a plate back on the plate stand, or from not being careful with my back when bending over to pick up a plate. So being careful to unload the bar in order to safely drop it down where you need it is a good idea. That's something I'm surprised I haven't hurt myself trying! :D

    Hear hear. I tweaked my back last week adjusting the height of the pulley on the cable machine at the gym. Sigh.

  • lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    @lmf1012

    Talking about this. Just the clean portion of it for getting it back up to squat or OHP height.




    Don't worry about hook grip, though it might be good prep for deadlifting heavier anyway.

    ETA - you can watch how they are lowering it without the dropping, which is the other part you'll want at home for now probably.

    These are great, thank you!! Definitely something for me to practice
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,870 Member Member Posts: 8,870 Member
    Just unload weight, lower barbell, begin warm up with appropriate weight.
  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,893 Member Member Posts: 3,893 Member
    I use 2 separate bars and areas in my garage for squats and deadlifts, which eliminates the need to load/unload a single bar for both lifts.

    The safety squat bar always in the squat rack and the other bar stays in a 9-bar bar holder until I need to use it and move the car out of the way to open up my deadlift space on top of a rubber mat, which can also be used for other lifts as well

    Something to consider doing if you (the OP) have the extra space/$ available.
    edited June 10
  • lmf1012lmf1012 Member Posts: 292 Member Member Posts: 292 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    I use 2 separate bars and areas in my garage for squats and deadlifts, which eliminates the need to load/unload a single bar for both lifts.

    The safety squat bar always in the squat rack and the other bar stays in a 9-bar bar holder until I need to use it and move the car out of the way to open up my deadlift space on top of a rubber mat, which can also be used for other lifts as well

    Something to consider doing if you (the OP) have the extra space/$ available.

    Yeah, I definitely have the space, my whole upstairs game room is now my home gym. The $ is just a matter of spacing out my gym purchases so I don’t go crazy all at once

    I think I will see how much I come to mind constantly unloading and reloading weights lol
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 18,917 Member Member Posts: 18,917 Member
    Only going to ask because I've seen others do it, and your reference to constantly unloading and reloading weight on a 3 lift workout makes me wonder.

    Each lift is done 5x5 before you move to the next one, right?
    It's not done as a circuit x 5 from lift to lift.
    edited June 11
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