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Internal body heat after strenuous exercise session

samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
Hi guys,

I experience "internal body heat" after strenuous exercise. It's hard to explain what internal body heat is, but it can't be cooled by air conditioning. It feels like something in my body is giving me extra heat. It is not fever as my temperature is normal. It goes away next day, but so uncomfortable at night.

The typical exercises which induce this is mountain hikes or hard cardio circuit.
I have no health problems.

I'm curious about this and if anyone has experienced it

Cheers
edited June 11

Replies

  • eliezaloteliezalot Member Posts: 486 Member Member Posts: 486 Member
    I think I've experienced something similar, where my internal temp feels high, and like it just keeps generating that temperature. Like, AC feels good, but yeah, doesn't seem to cool me down enough to stop the process. Mine usually goes away a bit more quickly...usually a few hours or so.

    Have cold showers or ice helped? I've found the best way for me to cool it off is a super cold shower. If that doesn't do it, ice packs anywhere the blood flows close to the skin (back of neck, forehead, underarms, groin), usually do the trick pretty quick.
  • MaltedTeaMaltedTea Member, Premium Posts: 5,657 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,657 Member
    You may want to look into cooling apparel/clothing.

    Furthermore, without being alarmist, you may want to bring up the matter (if you haven't already) at your next doctor's appointment.
  • samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
    eliezalot wrote: »
    I think I've experienced something similar, where my internal temp feels high, and like it just keeps generating that temperature. Like, AC feels good, but yeah, doesn't seem to cool me down enough to stop the process. Mine usually goes away a bit more quickly...usually a few hours or so.

    Have cold showers or ice helped? I've found the best way for me to cool it off is a super cold shower. If that doesn't do it, ice packs anywhere the blood flows close to the skin (back of neck, forehead, underarms, groin), usually do the trick pretty quick.

    Thanks a lot for your insight, I'm relieved 😌 that someone had similar situation. I'll try cooling these areas after the hike, and report back to you.
    Cheers
  • samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
    MaltedTea wrote: »
    You may want to look into cooling apparel/clothing.

    Furthermore, without being alarmist, you may want to bring up the matter (if you haven't already) at your next doctor's appointment.
    Thank you for your reply
    I wear normally loose clothing but yeah, I will look into cooling ones. Thank you
    Regarding the doctor, I saw him and he ran diabetes, blood pressure and blood tests.. All came clear.
  • DjproulxDjproulx Member Posts: 2,356 Member Member Posts: 2,356 Member
    In addition to the other comments, I'd suggest that if you are outdoors, cooling clothing such as hats and arm coolers (wrist to shoulder sleeves) can be a big help. They not only protect from the sun, but the cooling effect is increased by getting them wet. I often pour water into the hat and on the sleeves during workouts done in the heat.
  • heybalesheybales Member Posts: 18,913 Member Member Posts: 18,913 Member
    Do you feel like you are hydrated enough prior to the exercise, and during for most of it?

    Even if not sweating because it's not that hot - we put off moisture.

    If dehydrated your body may be hot enough it really wants to sweat but can't - I've reached that stage late in a bike ride.
    And at that point, it takes a long while to recover when I get back and start taking in the fluids. I usually weigh myself so I know how much I lost, but can't make it up that fast, nor does body absorb that fast.
    So heat does feel elevated for a long while. That delays other things too it seems like, so now those effects can drag into next day.

    Do you have a way of tracking HR before, during, and after the hike?

    Hard cardio circuit exercise I'd include body restoring carbs in muscle overnight.
    But not the hike unless you just made it hard on the muscles or really long hike with no food during.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,457 Member Member Posts: 10,457 Member
    Hard exercise including in the heat can throw your body's thermostat off and it can be hard to regulate your body temperature that evening. For me, I'm usually cold.
  • DjproulxDjproulx Member Posts: 2,356 Member Member Posts: 2,356 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Do you feel like you are hydrated enough prior to the exercise, and during for most of it?

    Even if not sweating because it's not that hot - we put off moisture.

    If dehydrated your body may be hot enough it really wants to sweat but can't - I've reached that stage late in a bike ride.
    And at that point, it takes a long while to recover when I get back and start taking in the fluids. I usually weigh myself so I know how much I lost, but can't make it up that fast, nor does body absorb that fast.
    So heat does feel elevated for a long while. That delays other things too it seems like, so now those effects can drag into next day.....

    .

    This is a great point.
  • samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
    I'm genuinely grateful and thankful for all your comments.
    heybales wrote: »
    Do you feel like you are hydrated enough prior to the exercise, and during for most of it?


    Do you have a way of tracking HR before, during, and after the hike?

    .

    Yes, I must have been dehydrated as I was pushing past my need to drink water in effort to train my body for a tough hike in the mountains where water can be scarce. Your comment makes absolute sense and I'm grateful that you shared that with me. I have now fitbit and I monitor my heart rate, is the heart rate after the hike and indicative of dehydration during the hike?

    Thanks in advance
    Djproulx wrote: »
    In addition to the other comments, I'd suggest that if you are outdoors, cooling clothing such as hats and arm coolers (wrist to shoulder sleeves) can be a big help. They not only protect from the sun, but the cooling effect is increased by getting them wet. I often pour water into the hat and on the sleeves during workouts done in the heat.

    Great suggestion, thanks buddy.

  • hiparihipari Member, Premium Posts: 1,235 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,235 Member
    Have you tracked your heart rate during and after those workouts? What’s the non-exercise part of your day/week like?

    The symptoms you experience remind me of the way I felt especially in early stages of pregnancy, when blood flow was increased. I have also sometimes had this happen after a sauna session, which also increases blood flow. Based on your profile picture and described situation, pregnancy seems unlikely, but workouts could cause a notable increase in blood flow as well. If your days are normally very sedentary and/or your heart rate stays elevated after workouts, it’s possible the exercise increases blood flow (compared to non-exercise days) enough for you to notice it as extra heat.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,457 Member Member Posts: 10,457 Member
    Planning on being dehydrated during a tough hike in the mountains is a risky idea. What if you fall out get hurt and immobilized? You wouldn't want to start an experience like that already suffering from lack of water.

    Can you bring a hydration pack, like a CamelBak?
  • yirarayirara Member Posts: 6,634 Member Member Posts: 6,634 Member
    That's interesting! When I run in the evening I usually use a double duvet (one of which for winter) because I'm freezing in bed and don't manage to get warm. Of course, now with 25C in my flat I wake up in the middle of the night and am way overheated with these two duvets. :s
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,310 Member Member Posts: 39,310 Member
    That happens when I ride later in the day during the summer months and I take about a 20ish minute cold shower which seems to help. Mostly I just try to ride earlier in the morning though if I can or do a ride indoors with Zwift. Hitting 100* this afternoon, so I'll be Zwifting when I get home. Going to try to get in a good trail ride tomorrow morning before it gets hot though. Sun has been rising around 5AM so I figure if I get on the mountain by 6 it'll be perfect.
  • samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
    Thank you all for sharing your experiences, thoughts and suggestions.
    Planning on being dehydrated during a tough hike in the mountains is a risky idea. What if you fall out get hurt and immobilized? You wouldn't want to start an experience like that already suffering from lack of water.

    Can you bring a hydration pack, like a CamelBak?

    Once I hiked in Snowdonia Mountain range in the UK in the summer, temperatures reached ~40 C degrees. I ran out of water 5 hours into the hike, and even though I knew the area very well and where the streams are, in the summer they dried out and had to hike to a lake which was about two hours walk away, took me 3 hours. At the start of that hike I carried 4 litres of water two of them in a camel pack and two bottles.
    Since then, I have been trying to hike as much as possible with little water but not to a dangerous level. My body is getting better at this and adapting. Once I'm home or the hike is finished, I drink a lot of water with electrolytes.
    hipari wrote: »
    Have you tracked your heart rate during and after those workouts? What’s the non-exercise part of your day/week like?

    The symptoms you experience remind me of the way I felt especially in early stages of pregnancy, when blood flow was increased. I have also sometimes had this happen after a sauna session, which also increases blood flow. Based on your profile picture and described situation, pregnancy seems unlikely, but workouts could cause a notable increase in blood flow as well. If your days are normally very sedentary and/or your heart rate stays elevated after workouts, it’s possible the exercise increases blood flow (compared to non-exercise days) enough for you to notice it as extra heat.
    Thank you for your reply..
    My resting heart rate is around 61bpm. I'm a male weigh 117kg stand at height of 5'10'' and body fat of 26%. In tough mountain hikes my heart rate can reach 175 -180bpm ..but recover to ~ 100 quickly
  • cookie_cookiecookie_cookie Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3 Member
    This is a completely normal occurrence for me! I exercise regularly (running/cycling) and it happens if I’ve increased my training load/intensity. I get so hot overnight I’ll wake drenched in sweat 😅
  • RunsWithBeesRunsWithBees Member Posts: 1,464 Member Member Posts: 1,464 Member
    When I first started exercising I began from a 100% sedentary lifestyle. When I would workout heavily I felt like what you are describing. The best way I can explain it was that it felt like a low grade fever and lasted throughout the night, even though I took a cool shower, was well rested and ate and drank plenty after the workout. At my annual physical I asked my doctor about it and he said it was totally normal, had something to do with being sensitive to the release of adrenaline and/or other hormones that can occur during a strenuous workout and the body subsequently clearing it out afterwards. He said to rest, eat and stay hydrated and not to worry. After about two years of working out regularly I rarely got this low grade fever heat feeling anymore, doc said my body adapted and became more efficient at processing hormones and stuff that can be released during workouts. I did used to have liver problems so that might have been a factor in my case but those liver issues have resolved now that I maintain a healthy weight and exercise regularly so I guess my liver just works better now. Not saying this is what’s going on in your case, just my own personal experience. Best of luck on your health journey! :)
  • samamad5149samamad5149 Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member Member, Premium Posts: 13 Member
    This is a completely normal occurrence for me! I exercise regularly (running/cycling) and it happens if I’ve increased my training load/intensity. I get so hot overnight I’ll wake drenched in sweat 😅

    Thank you for sharing this, I guess there is one downside to exercise 😁
    When I first started exercising I began from a 100% sedentary lifestyle. When I would workout heavily I felt like what you are describing. The best way I can explain it was that it felt like a low grade fever and lasted throughout the night, even though I took a cool shower, was well rested and ate and drank plenty after the workout. At my annual physical I asked my doctor about it and he said it was totally normal, had something to do with being sensitive to the release of adrenaline and/or other hormones that can occur during a strenuous workout and the body subsequently clearing it out afterwards. He said to rest, eat and stay hydrated and not to worry. After about two years of working out regularly I rarely got this low grade fever heat feeling anymore, doc said my body adapted and became more efficient at processing hormones and stuff that can be released during workouts. I did used to have liver problems so that might have been a factor in my case but those liver issues have resolved now that I maintain a healthy weight and exercise regularly so I guess my liver just works better now. Not saying this is what’s going on in your case, just my own personal experience. Best of luck on your health journey! :)

    Thank you for sharing your insightful experience. It is the same thing with me, I started to go on long hikes from a completely sedentary life style (office job, car commute and no accountability of food intake). Only difference still happen when I put in a high intense workout. I'm glad it is nothing to worry about. Also well done on turning your lifestyle around! 💪
  • vanmepvanmep Member Posts: 377 Member Member Posts: 377 Member
    Sounds just like menopause! But then I see you are male so I guess you will never experience that joy 😆
  • cheriej2042cheriej2042 Member Posts: 229 Member Member Posts: 229 Member
    I’ve had this happen and I have never figured out what triggered it other than I worked out over a long period of time and it was hot temp outside. No matter what I do my body won’t cool down until the next morning. I do think it has to do with something being released in my system that just takes time, another thing I get is an exercise induced rash when it’s really hot that starts at my ankles but sometimes hits spots on my leg or waist and it’s not chafing.it can take days for that to go away.
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