Personal trainer, yay or nay?

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Replies

  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 5,700 Member
    PS: having a trainer also means having a dedicated spotter, which helps my confidence a LOT.
  • rosebarnalice
    rosebarnalice Posts: 3,494 Member
    I had a wonderful PT who helped me with both a shoulder impingement ad a hip labrum tear. When I met him the first time and he asked me about my goals, I asked specifically for exercises that would be beneficial to my overall fitness goals that would not damage my shoulder and hip--and would, in fact improve them.

    I went a step further, and asked if I could have an aquatherapy consultation (it's the only PT firm in my area that offers the service) to have the PT examine my current swimming strokes and make recommendations for adjustments that would meet both my PT-strength goals and my overall fitness goals.

    I was extremely satisfied. I think the key is having that conversation with your PT about what you really WANT so they build those into your goals for therapy
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,277 Member
    I’ve always been on the fence about personal trainers as I’m more of a self-educator.

    If you are a self-starter and can follow basic laws of nutrition and fitness, I say save your money. If you need the accountability, guidance, structure and nurturing go for a personal trainer.

    This really depends on what you're trying to get out of it. I've been training for decades as both a competitive athlete in my younger years and recreationally on my own. I've always had the absolute best results in my overall performance and fitness when I'm being coached up or working with a trainer. A good coach or trainer is going to have a tremendous breadth of knowledge that just takes things to another level.

    At my current age and state of being I'm fine with mostly the basics and just being relatively fit and healthy and can definitely do that on my own...but a good coach or trainer is a game changer if you're wanting more.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,155 Member
    edited September 2021
    I'm thinking about joining my local gym but I am a total newbie. I have spoken with a PT who works in a gym close to my home and we had a great chat about my goals and how she can help me, and I think it's really worth a go.

    I've been a yo yo dieter for years but I'm finally finding my groove with CICO and I've already lost 22lbs myself with this and walking at lunch, but we are coming into the winter and I know I'm going to find it harder to get out and move.

    The PT charges £300 a month for 8 sessions a month (2 a week) but it's a full service, so will have weekly and monthly check ups outside of the PT sessions, support with nutrition and working on strength and resistance.

    I also have hip impingement on my right side, and I have a sign off from my physio to start exercising with limits and she can build my gym schedule from scratch just for me.

    I feel like it's worth it, but I have had a few people raise issue with how expensive it is, and now I'm doubting myself.

    Does anybody have any advice or thoughts?

    Assuming you are already paying your physiotherapist I would just get the training program from them, especially if you have limits you have to work within. That is what I do anyway. They are far more qualified than a "personal trainer" (anyone can call themselves a trainer) and they already know (and more importantly understand) your medical/injury history.
  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    She suggested I take some classes so a teacher could check my form. I said *I am* a yoga teacher. She said it is still useful for someone else to look at my form.

    I totally agree. At least take video. My form has improved in leaps and bounds by taking video of my lifts. My PT requests them and provides feedback but it has got to the point where I can see myself what's going wrong and can correct from set to set.

  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,276 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I’ve always been on the fence about personal trainers as I’m more of a self-educator.

    If you are a self-starter and can follow basic laws of nutrition and fitness, I say save your money. If you need the accountability, guidance, structure and nurturing go for a personal trainer.

    After many years of ballet, yoga, and becoming a certified yoga teacher, I pay attention to form. I've seen a LOT of bad form at gyms over the years, lol.

    My physical therapist was wanting to let me go now that I no longer have pain in my Achilles tendon. I told her that I've been holding back from doing yoga and that my knee pain would probably kick back in once I ramp up yoga again. She suggested I take some classes so a teacher could check my form. I said *I am* a yoga teacher. She said it is still useful for someone else to look at my form.

    Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods had/have coaches/trainers.
  • IllustriousBee
    IllustriousBee Posts: 70 Member
    I've had a personal trainer for well over a year now. It is very much worth it to me because she pushes me to do things that I know I wouldn't do on my own. I train with her 2 days a week for 30-minute sessions, and I pay $240 per month. I have a lower rate because I only get training for weightlifting. I do most of my fitness-related stuff (cardio, some strength training, and meal planning) all on my own, so I think $300 a month is VERY reasonable for all the extras the trainer OP mentioned offers.
  • liz60625
    liz60625 Posts: 17 Member
    I was hesitant about a personal trainer when I started 2 years ago, very overweight. Reasons I’ve stayed and love it:

    I like the 1:1 teaching and accountability.
    She pushes me further than I would push myself
    She keeps track of what I can and can’t do and helps me grow even 5 seconds at a time
    She understands my body and what it can do
    I get a personalized plan and just have to compare myself to me, not everyone else at the gym.

    Highly recommend whatever you can swing.