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I have to severely limit my salt intake. Everything has so much salt in it these days! I'm limited to 2000mg salt per day. Is there any good low salt bread?

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  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 1,673 Member
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    I have to severely limit my salt intake. Everything has so much salt in it these days! I'm limited to 2000mg salt per day. Is there any good low salt bread?

    Maybe try Ezekiel bread. You're best bet is going to be going to your grocery store and looking at the back labels. That way you know what's available to you.
  • avatiach
    avatiach Posts: 291 Member
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    If you bake the bread yourself, you can limit the salt you put in it.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,018 Member
    edited June 2023
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    Probably nothing that would taste like bread. Maybe there's 200mg's in 2 slices of plain white bread but your going to have to start to take all the processed food your eating and make a choice and throw some of it out and replace with whole natural food so you can eat bread that taste like bread, if bread is non negotiable for example. imo

  • raenright
    raenright Posts: 54 Member
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    Porridge bread is super easy to make and fine to leave the salt out.

    https://www.flahavans.ie/recipe/mary-flahavans-porridge-bread/
  • bubbe3304
    bubbe3304 Posts: 1 Member
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    I have the same problem. I don’t eat a lot of bread and the Sara Lee 45cal wheat has 190 sodium for the two slices. I will usually have it toasted with avocado ( no sodium).
    I’ve been way under 2000mg but I am very diligent. If you break up the 2000mg allotment over 3 meals you should be able to stay under for the day. I’ve been under 1000 and still eating good. I also substitute bread with rice cakes ( unsalted) and some of the other flavors are also sodium free which I will have for snack. I’m eating more fruit, vegetables. You are right though- it isn’t easy. You have to think a lot about it and prepare.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,868 Member
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    I have to severely limit my salt intake. Everything has so much salt in it these days! I'm limited to 2000mg salt per day. Is there any good low salt bread?

    I try to keep mine around 2300-2500...if I go below 2000mg or too low in general I cramp up a lot because most of my exercise is outdoors in the heat and I sweat a lot. My Dr. originally wanted me below 1800mg and that was absolutely terrible for me...I told him what was going on and we decided to try 2500 and that's been more or less fine for the last decade +. My need to monitor sodium is related to hypertension, so YMMV with what you need to do per whatever condition you have and your overall lifestyle. Another thing to consider if your need is hypertension related is your potassium. That balance is pretty important and most people consuming the SAD eat far too much sodium and nowhere close to enough potassium. If it's a kidney thing...errrr...that's a tough one.

    This is probably something that is going to take some experimentation on your part. I'd start by just logging what you're eating in general (and looking at food labels). Identify those items that are higher in sodium and then determine what is negotiable and non-negotiable for you. If you can't live without the bread or a sandwich then you'll have to make cuts elsewhere...and/or have your sandwich on certain days and cut something else out or whatever.

    In general, if you need to watch sodium you need to start working towards a diet that is largely whole foods based and minimize processed foods (especially highly processed foods) and watch how much you're dining out. Both processed foods and restaurant foods are typically pretty high sodium. I have my "Pierre no care" moments, but I try to keep them to a minimum.

    Basically, get in the kitchen and cook. When I use minimally processed goods like canned tomatoes or canned beans I go for the lower sodium versions and in general when I cook I don't add a lot of salt (nowhere near what any recipes calls for) and figure people can salt afterwards if they so desire. I've learned to appreciate the brilliance of a variety of herbs and spices that really come through when things aren't overly salted. One downside is that often when we dine out, I find the food overly salty...even at higher end restaurants.
  • Creamtea42
    Creamtea42 Posts: 273 Member
    edited June 2023
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    I’m in a similar position OP. What I find in the MFP database is that the sodium in the foods, including breads, is grossly underestimated. A fellow MFP’er signposted me to the Austalian Heart Foundation website and there is a sodium - salt converter on there. Really useful for a UK subscriber!
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,988 Member
    edited June 2023
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    sollyn23l2 wrote: »
    I have to severely limit my salt intake. Everything has so much salt in it these days! I'm limited to 2000mg salt per day. Is there any good low salt bread?

    Maybe try Ezekiel bread. You're best bet is going to be going to your grocery store and looking at the back labels. That way you know what's available to you.

    https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/g30533363/low-sodium-bread/

    @bonobird5712 Sprouted breads can indeed be low or no sodium. Ezekiel makes this list twice. I've had their # 1 pick, which is not labeled as low sodium, but only has 75 mg. Their "low sodium" is actually "no sodium" and I have never had it.

    Sprouted breads might take a little while to get used to, but on the plus side, I find them very filling.

    Nature's Own 100% Whole Wheat Bread is like regular supermarket whole wheat bread and has 150 mg sodium.

    Dave's Killer Bread Thin-Sliced, Organic 21 Whole Grains and Seeds Bread is actually my brand these days. 100 mg sodium. Note this is the *Thin-Sliced* - it's smaller than their regular wide loaf, and has only 60 calories per slice. One of the many reasons I like it is because it's also about the width of a slice of cheese, which sent me down a sodium content of cheese rabbit hole :lol: Cabot cheddar has 160 g sodium per slice while Market Basket (regional store) brand only has 40 g sodium per slice of Swiss.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,988 Member
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    @bonobird5712 do manually verify EVERY SINGLE user-created entry the first time you use it, and hopefully you have better luck with sodium values than I did when I was anemic and looking at iron values.

    Unfortunately, the green check marks in the MFP database are used for both USER-created entries and ADMIN-created entries that MFP pulled from the USDA database. A green check mark for USER-created entries just means enough people have upvoted the entry - it is not necessarily correct.

    To find ADMIN entries for whole foods, I get the syntax from the USDA database and paste that into MFP. All ADMIN entries from the USDA will have weights as an option BUT there is a glitch whereby sometimes 1g is the option but the values are actually for 100g. This is pretty easy to spot though, as when added the calories are 100x more than is reasonable.

    https://fdc.nal.usda.gov

    Use the “SR Legacy” tab - that's what MFP used to pull in entries.

    I've never had a problem with micros with ADMIN-created entries that MFP pulled from the USDA database.

    Note: any MFP entry that includes "USDA" was USER entered.

    For packaged foods, I verify the label against what I find in MFP. (Alas, you cannot just scan with your phone and assume what you get is correct. Note: scanning is mostly only available with Premium these days.
  • homemyfitness
    homemyfitness Posts: 2 Member
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    Please be careful, because myfitnesspal has a major UX flaw regarding salt/sodium.

    - Sodium: The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2300 milligrams (mg) a day and moving toward an ideal limit of no more than 1500 mg per day for most adults.
    - Salt, which contains 40% of sodium, has a recommendation by the OMS of 5g, which is around 2000 milligrams of sodium.

    If you live in most of the world outside US, be careful with this, as I was just making the same mistake, as our packages contain the values for salt, not for sodium. 1 gram of salt is just 400 mg of sodium.