If your heart rate is naturally quite high . . .

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If your heart rate is naturally quite high do you burn more calories as a result?

My heart rate is rather high for a variety of reasons. My own personal elliptical doesn't have one of those hand pulse hrm's but the last time I used one in early December my heart rate reached 170 and the machine kept telling me to slow down -_-
I'm 22 and 5ft 0. If my heart rate is consistently in and around 170 am I going to be burning at a faster rate than what MFP states. I've tried to look for a page that explains how MFP calculates calorie burns but I can't see anything.
Would be grateful for some help with this.
x.x.

Replies

  • Hornsby
    Hornsby Posts: 10,322 Member
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    MFP calorie burns are grossly exaggerated. I would not go by them at all really.

    And I am unsure on the burn based on your heart rate but will tell you that I can average 168 with maxes at 185 for over an hour. I wouldn't consider 170 high at all really.
  • hearthemelody
    hearthemelody Posts: 1,025 Member
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    Don't take this the wrong way but...

    If your heart rate was naturally high enough to make a difference why would you be trying to lose weight?
  • Shawshankcan
    Shawshankcan Posts: 900 Member
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    Either you are REALLY pushing it or your cardio is really lacking.
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,951 Member
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    Either you are REALLY pushing it or your cardio is really lacking.

    I would say this.

    OP - what is your resting heart rate?
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,532 Member
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    If your heart rate is naturally quite high do you burn more calories as a result?

    No.

    And if the reason your heart rate is "naturally high" is because of a general lack of fitness, you actually have a lower ability to burn calories.
  • CakePlate
    CakePlate Posts: 27 Member
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    My heart rate gets pretty high - I'm obese and trying to run! I'm not sure it is possible to really know what your true calorie burn is. I use a HRM and what it says, compared to what the equipment says, compared to what MFP says are all so varied (hundreds of calories different), that I use it more as motivation and fun, but not as a tool to gauge how much I burned - or more important, how many calories I can eat. I eat the same number of calories no matter how much I exercise, no extra serving of food for me! I'm a doubter. You'll find that the more you exercise, the harder you will have to work to get your heart rate up. As on other person mentioned, you have to determine what your resting heart rate is before you know what your "target" heart rate is. Splurg on a HRM, it will walk you through all of that.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,209 Member
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    Either you are REALLY pushing it or your cardio is really lacking.

    Or they have reduced cardiac output.
  • fairygirlpie9
    fairygirlpie9 Posts: 288 Member
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    Either you are REALLY pushing it or your cardio is really lacking.

    I would say this.

    OP - what is your resting heart rate?

    My resting heart rate is 64 beats per minute. Apparently that's normal according to the NHS website.

    "Most adults have a resting heart rate between 60 and 100 beats per minute (bpm).
    The fitter you are, the lower your resting heart rate is likely to be. For example, athletes may have a resting heart rate of 40-60 bpm or lower." - NHS
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,951 Member
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    Hmmm, then I'd say it's your level of fitness. As you do more, that number will drop. For now, I'd personally think you'd derive the most benefit from staying in HR Zone 2 to bring up that basal aerobic fitness. Meaning somewhere in the range of 105-130 bpm, to round it around to make it a little more generic.

    On occasion you should push into those higher reaches, but I think developing a base would be a benefit for you right now.
  • fairygirlpie9
    fairygirlpie9 Posts: 288 Member
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    Hmmm, then I'd say it's your level of fitness. As you do more, that number will drop. For now, I'd personally think you'd derive the most benefit from staying in HR Zone 2 to bring up that basal aerobic fitness. Meaning somewhere in the range of 105-130 bpm, to round it around to make it a little more generic.

    On occasion you should push into those higher reaches, but I think developing a base would be a benefit for you right now.

    Excuse my lack of knowledge but what does 'HR Zone 2' mean and why would it be better to stay in a lower zone? I might be a bit fat but I'm not really that unfit really so what would the benefit be in lowering my intensity - surely my fitness will improve and I will lose more weight with a higher heart rate?
  • sammyneb
    sammyneb Posts: 257
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    I believe some people just have a higher heart rate threshold. I have ran 5 half marathons and 1 marathon. I have been running pretty consistently for just over 2 years. When I run my heart rate is between 150-175. My resting heart rate is between 48-55. So I believe my cardio is just fine, but yet I have a higher heart rate. So long as your resting heart rate is not high, I wouldn't be overly concerned about it. (And I actually went to the Dr about it because i was freaked out about the high heart rate, got an ekg and they hooked me up to a 24 hr holtier monitor, everything checked out just fine) My guess is it will get lower the more you work out, but I wouldn't worry about it unless you feel faint or bad when your heart rate is that high.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,874 Member
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    No...your HR has no direct correlation to your calorie burn. Your HR is simply used in an algorithm by a HRM to estimate the level of VO2 max that you are working at. That algorithm assumes a steady state cardio event as well as an average HR of someone of your similar stats. If you have a higher than average HR you will fall out of those statistical norms and your calorie burn will be inflated.

    Have you seen a doctor about your HR? Are you hypertensive? I'm hypertensive and had a RHR of 110 until I got put on my Beta Blocker...with that I have a resting HR now of 65 and normal BP.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
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    What is your resting heart rate? If it is higher than 90, I'd suggest seeing a doctor.

    I have normal blood pressure- usually 120/84 but I have extreme tachycardia. I was actually admitted to the hospital a few weeks ago because I was in v-tach which is very dangerous. I take a beta blocker for it called Propranonol and it helps significantly.
  • WalkingAlong
    WalkingAlong Posts: 4,926 Member
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    I wouldn't consider 170 high at all really.
    I agree. On the off chance the old '220 minus ag'e formula applies to you, it's only 85% of your max. I'm over twice your age and can get my HR to 200 and that's at excellent cardio health, and no I don't burn more calories than most. It's just genetics.
  • laurynwithawhy
    laurynwithawhy Posts: 385 Member
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    Agree with most of the above posters. Just because your HR is higher doesn't mean you're burning more calories. I have a very high exercising heart rate because I have an arrhythmia (extra heart beat for every 8 beats). Most of the time my heart rate is 170-210 depending on the exercise. I wish it meant I burned more calories, but I don't. Sorry OP.
  • leenavasquez
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    I'm not sure about the burning more calories, I came across this wondering the same thing. I just thought I would tell you that I'm in the same situation and thought I would maybe ease your mind if you're getting concerned over so many people telling you you should see a doctor. My high exercising heart rate was discovered in the army and since they like to protect government property I was put through every test imaginable to see if something was wrong. I also have a normal resting heart rate and my heart rate recovers pretty quickly after I stop exercising. While I exercise it stays around 180 and if I really push myself it goes into the 200's. During a stress test it peaked at 263. They never found anything physically wrong with my heart nor do I have an abnormal rhythm. I was eventually told that my heart rate is just naturally outside of the 'normal' range and that I was fine. If you are not experiencing pains or anything accompanying it, then I wouldn't be too concerned. Also, just because someone has a high heart rate compared to you, doesn't mean they're out of shape. I was in AMAZING shape in the army and still had a high exercising heart rate people. Sorry I can't answer you're original question though, I wish I knew.
  • Cortelli
    Cortelli Posts: 1,369 Member
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    No...your HR has no direct correlation to your calorie burn. Your HR is simply used in an algorithm by a HRM to estimate the level of VO2 max that you are working at. That algorithm assumes a steady state cardio event as well as an average HR of someone of your similar stats. If you have a higher than average HR you will fall out of those statistical norms and your calorie burn will be inflated.

    Have you seen a doctor about your HR? Are you hypertensive? I'm hypertensive and had a RHR of 110 until I got put on my Beta Blocker...with that I have a resting HR now of 65 and normal BP.

    Interesting - that's a big drop in RHR from meds - I had no idea. My RHR (first thing in the morning) is around 70, and I am pre-hypertensive. 120s / 70s in the morning, but during the day, even with an extended "relax in a dark room" period, might be high 130s / 90 or creeping into low 140s. Going to see my doc in the next few weeks since getting down to goal weight hasn't entirely corrected it on its own (but helped it) but hoping to avoid medication. Still think I'd go to meds rather than try to stick to a strict DASH diet.

    OP - I believe I am reasonably fit though not a huge fan of cardio, and my HR peaks in the high 180s / low 190s on an elliptical and similar machines if I really push it (and particularly after getting my base rate up with a short HIIT session, resting a bit and then hitting cardio). And at that rate I am not out of breath / huffing-puffing / dying -- just working hard. Almost 44 yo male. I agree with cwolfman that it doesn't mean we're burning more calories with an elevated heartrate and also agree that you should talk to a doc just to see if you are hypertensive or pre-. Two docs were concerned enough with my pre-hypertensive readings despite relative fitness that they suggested I buy a BP cuff to check from home, which I do. Can't seem to get it below 120 / 70 so meds may be in my future :cry: