Eating at a deficit but not losing fat or lbs.

24

Replies

  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    I don't. Others do.

    I weigh things that come multiple servings per container (and that aren't pre-portioned, like I wouldn't weigh a slice of bread but I would weigh ice cream), things that I've made myself, and anything loose (fruits, veggies, butter, meats, flour is a BIG one, etc).
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,372 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    I weigh everything but yogurt/pudding cups pretty much, because that would be too much of a pain. Avocado and bananas I weigh without peel, peaches etc... I'm still not sure what you're supposed to do, lol.

    Also make sure to use the correct entries for raw vs cooked for meats, pasta etc.
  • andylowry
    andylowry Posts: 89
    ... Also opt for whole fats from animal sources as these are best.

    Let me be the first to welcome you to your new Statin prescription!
  • editorgrrl
    editorgrrl Posts: 7,060 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?
    Weigh everything means everything. The label of that bun will say 100 calories for one bun, then (probably in parentheses) it will specify a weight in grams. Weigh that bun. If it's more than specified, it's more than 100 calories.

    Learn to read labels. That can of tuna probably specifies a serving as x number of grams, drained. Weigh everything. For produce (and probably meat), look for USDA entries. They often specify whether it's peeled or not.

    Nobody thinks they're underestimating their food, but you're going to be shocked when you start weighing your food.
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    I weigh everything but yogurt/pudding cups pretty much, because that would be too much of a pain. Avocado and bananas I weigh without peel, peaches etc... I'm still not sure what you're supposed to do, lol.

    Also make sure to use the correct entries for raw vs cooked for meats, pasta etc.

    This is important, imo.

    You've got to decide where the line is for yourself OP. And then realize that it's never going to be 100% perfect. The idea is to get it as close as you can without making yourself crazy. Like I know people who are fine with taking their food scale to a restaurant. I'm not one of those people. I just understand that when I say I'm eating 2000 calories, it's likely not *exactly* that amount.

    The trouble comes when you're relying on a burn estimate from a device like BMF and saying "well I have a 600 calorie deficit" when you likely don't, even if your BMF is right on. You should still be willing to adjust based on your actual results.
  • cmcoyle776
    cmcoyle776 Posts: 20 Member
    Is it possible that the Bodymedia is calculating your burns too high? It sounds like you're doing some serious workouts, and it looks like you're about 10 years younger than me so you should still have a decent metabolism, but TDEE of 2700 sounds quite high, especially if you're not that overweight.

    I was thinking the same. I'm also a SAHM, I'm on my feet most of the day, & and even on my Insanity workout days (I alternate Insanity w/ running 3-4 miles), I only burn 2300 calories at best. On a lazy day, I burn about 1600. I'm 38 & at 30% body fat, so not far off from you. Make sure you are weighing/measuring all your food/beverages & drinking plenty of water. Dehydration slows your metabolism.
  • Jewlz280
    Jewlz280 Posts: 547 Member
    I would say your issue is that your burn is reading too high and you aren't weighing (which has been mentioned). I don't work out as much as you do, so I don't eat back my cals. But my intake is still pretty high at 1600 to 1700. But I do weigh my food. I weigh meat, high fat content foods like peanut butter, butter, etc., AND high sugar foods like jelly and ice cream. I use to weigh things like bananas and apples, but after weighing for a while, I just eat them and log the one because most of the time I get really really close (within a few grams, actually). And since veg is so low cal, I don't stress over it and just eyeball things like lettuce. I don't fool with pre-packaged because I figure if I am slightly over-estimating on the others, then I am coming out pretty spot on. I want to lose and watch my portions, but not drive myself crazy! But I've been at this for a while and am on my last 'chunk' now and have kept the previous loss off. So, you can start weighing the things you've been eyeballing to see where you are at and then decide what to do from there. As another poster mentioned, you can either keep weighing or drop cals down to say, 1900. But for me, I'd do some little tweaks like not eating back all of your exercise and see how that goes. Then drop overall cals if that doesn't do much. Also, from your avatar, it doesn't look like you have far to go, so it is going to be slow going anyways. So, you have time to tweak and find what works. :smile:
  • Newfiedan
    Newfiedan Posts: 1,517 Member
    No I am simply saying that using the existing hormones to your advantage for fat loss just makes sense. 4 years of personal experimentation shows that it works. It is the main principle behind diets like carb backloading and the warrior diet which both work very well for muscle preservation while shedding fat. I initially set out to prove these wrong as I was once a calories in calories out advocate but when I tried them they worked very well. That led to the use of a cyclic ketogenic diet which works extremely well for fat loss and muscle retention and there is very little caloric cutting needed to make it work well. I have been at 158 lbs and 10% bodyfat however any weight I was losing at that point was nearly a 50/50 ratio of fat to muscle mass. I have also been 165 and 175 lbs and 10% bodyfat at what point was I healthier? At my heaviest was my best blood work. My doctor warned me that using a cyclic ketogenic diet was going to cause more damage so we took blood work, measurements and did a bodyfat analysis I was 167 lbs and about 12 % bodyfat at the time. Blood pressure was high normal, cholesterol was slightly high. Waistline was 33" at the time. Now fast forward 4 months into a cyclic ketogenic diet all health markers had improved dramatically, blood pressure was normal, cholesterol was excellent, waistline was 31" (first movement in that one in over a year or just caloric cutting) and I was down to 163lbs and 10% bodyfat. I am not saying take my word for it, try it yourself, however I can say with 100% conviction that 1 calorie of protein or fat is not equal to 1 calorie for carbs. Carbs are not the enemy but when it comes to fat loss timing, and how they are used can make a world of difference. Anyone who has eaten at a deficit and has not seen bodyfat changes will know this to be true. Weight without context means squat to your health, you can just become a smaller less healthy you or you can learn how to manipulate macros and use them to your advantage.
  • GertrudeHorse
    GertrudeHorse Posts: 646 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    Yes weigh everything. Absolutely everything. All beverages. All food that goes into your mouth. At least for a couple of months. After that you will get a better idea of eye-balling portions. BUT, even after a few months I would recommend you keep on weighing calorie dense stuff like peanut butter, cheese and ice cream. Even a couple of grams this way or that will throw your counts out by significant quantities each week. With practice you should be able to stop weighing stuff like fruit and vegetables, slices of bread, or pre-portioned stuff. But do get a digital scale and try it for at least two months. You have nothing to lose except weight :smile:

    ETA: Yes 2700 does sound extremely high. I'm over six foot tall and my maintenance is 2700+exercise calories. Are you nearly six foot or taller? If not then I would be extremely surprised to find you burn that many calories. Combine this with underestimating your intake (even by as little as 10%) you have found the reason you aren't losing body fat.
  • LolBroScience
    LolBroScience Posts: 4,555 Member
    No I am simply saying that using the existing hormones to your advantage for fat loss just makes sense. 4 years of personal experimentation shows that it works. It is the main principle behind diets like carb backloading and the warrior diet which both work very well for muscle preservation while shedding fat. I initially set out to prove these wrong as I was once a calories in calories out advocate but when I tried them they worked very well. That led to the use of a cyclic ketogenic diet which works extremely well for fat loss and muscle retention and there is very little caloric cutting needed to make it work well. I have been at 158 lbs and 10% bodyfat however any weight I was losing at that point was nearly a 50/50 ratio of fat to muscle mass. I have also been 165 and 175 lbs and 10% bodyfat at what point was I healthier? At my heaviest was my best blood work. My doctor warned me that using a cyclic ketogenic diet was going to cause more damage so we took blood work, measurements and did a bodyfat analysis I was 167 lbs and about 12 % bodyfat at the time. Blood pressure was high normal, cholesterol was slightly high. Waistline was 33" at the time. Now fast forward 4 months into a cyclic ketogenic diet all health markers had improved dramatically, blood pressure was normal, cholesterol was excellent, waistline was 31" (first movement in that one in over a year or just caloric cutting) and I was down to 163lbs and 10% bodyfat. I am not saying take my word for it, try it yourself, however I can say with 100% conviction that 1 calorie of protein or fat is not equal to 1 calorie for carbs. Carbs are not the enemy but when it comes to fat loss timing, and how they are used can make a world of difference. Anyone who has eaten at a deficit and has not seen bodyfat changes will know this to be true. Weight without context means squat to your health, you can just become a smaller less healthy you or you can learn how to manipulate macros and use them to your advantage.

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  • GertrudeHorse
    GertrudeHorse Posts: 646 Member
    No I am simply saying that using the existing hormones to your advantage for fat loss just makes sense. 4 years of personal experimentation shows that it works for my body but it doesn't tell me how other people's bodies will respond.

    FIFY.
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    Yes weigh everything. Absolutely everything. All beverages. All food that goes into your mouth. At least for a couple of months. After that you will get a better idea of eye-balling portions. BUT, even after a few months I would recommend you keep on weighing calorie dense stuff like peanut butter, cheese and ice cream. Even a couple of grams this way or that will throw your counts out by significant quantities each week. With practice you should be able to stop weighing stuff like fruit and vegetables, slices of bread, or pre-portioned stuff. But do get a digital scale and try it for at least two months. You have nothing to lose except weight :smile:

    ETA: Yes 2700 does sound extremely high. I'm over six foot tall and my maintenance is 2700+exercise calories. Are you nearly six foot or taller? If not then I would be extremely surprised to find you burn that many calories. Combine this with underestimating your intake (even by as little as 10%) you have found the reason you aren't losing body fat.

    I'd agree, but I have seen some ladies say they eat that much to lose. For me personally, 1700 is my cutting calorie level with running 2 days per week and lifting 3 days per week.
  • GertrudeHorse
    GertrudeHorse Posts: 646 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    Yes weigh everything. Absolutely everything. All beverages. All food that goes into your mouth. At least for a couple of months. After that you will get a better idea of eye-balling portions. BUT, even after a few months I would recommend you keep on weighing calorie dense stuff like peanut butter, cheese and ice cream. Even a couple of grams this way or that will throw your counts out by significant quantities each week. With practice you should be able to stop weighing stuff like fruit and vegetables, slices of bread, or pre-portioned stuff. But do get a digital scale and try it for at least two months. You have nothing to lose except weight :smile:

    ETA: Yes 2700 does sound extremely high. I'm over six foot tall and my maintenance is 2700+exercise calories. Are you nearly six foot or taller? If not then I would be extremely surprised to find you burn that many calories. Combine this with underestimating your intake (even by as little as 10%) you have found the reason you aren't losing body fat.

    I'd agree, but I have seen some ladies say they eat that much to lose. For me personally, 1700 is my cutting calorie level with running 2 days per week and lifting 3 days per week.

    Yeah it's definitely possible, although in this specific instance I would be surprised given lack of fat or weight loss.
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    Ok. So when you guys say weigh everything, does that also mean pre-packaged items that have a set value. For instance, a thinwich bun is 100 calories, or a can of tuna (which I actually did weigh once and my 5oz can was only 3.6 oz I felt totally jipped! Lol) Do I need to weigh things like that too? Or are we just talking fruits, veggies, oatmeal, etc? I imagine I'm actually overestimating on some of these (often putting in a large apple, when it's actually small or medium). And if I'm weighing a banana or an avocado, is that with or without peel?

    Yes weigh everything. Absolutely everything. All beverages. All food that goes into your mouth. At least for a couple of months. After that you will get a better idea of eye-balling portions. BUT, even after a few months I would recommend you keep on weighing calorie dense stuff like peanut butter, cheese and ice cream. Even a couple of grams this way or that will throw your counts out by significant quantities each week. With practice you should be able to stop weighing stuff like fruit and vegetables, slices of bread, or pre-portioned stuff. But do get a digital scale and try it for at least two months. You have nothing to lose except weight :smile:

    ETA: Yes 2700 does sound extremely high. I'm over six foot tall and my maintenance is 2700+exercise calories. Are you nearly six foot or taller? If not then I would be extremely surprised to find you burn that many calories. Combine this with underestimating your intake (even by as little as 10%) you have found the reason you aren't losing body fat.

    I'd agree, but I have seen some ladies say they eat that much to lose. For me personally, 1700 is my cutting calorie level with running 2 days per week and lifting 3 days per week.

    Yeah it's definitely possible, although in this specific instance I would be surprised given lack of fat or weight loss.

    Agreed.
  • Sarauk2sf
    Sarauk2sf Posts: 28,072 Member
    Ok. Thank you. And thanks for linking the article. I find myself becoming increasingly frustrated because I do most of that stuff. I feel like I'm pretty meticulous about counting my food, and while I don't weigh it all, I do measure everything and weigh meat. My only other thought is that my BMF is overestimating my burn. I'm already pretty hungry on lifting days--even eating 2100 calories. Sounds like my only option is to drop my calories.

    Your BMF could well be over-estimating.

    Wearable devices to estimate TDEE are a useful tool, but that is all they are, a tool, and again, actual results trump their estimates. They do not take into account specifics and individuality as to someone’s actual BMR but uses estimates to calculate the TDEE it reports.
  • Sarauk2sf
    Sarauk2sf Posts: 28,072 Member
    OP: how much do you weigh?
  • angiek123
    angiek123 Posts: 29 Member
    OP: how much do you weigh?

    I'm hovering around 155 now at 5'6".
  • angiek123
    angiek123 Posts: 29 Member
    I appreciate all the responses. I haven't quite been able to trust the BMF calculations. I have heard that it's 90-95% accurate, but again, I don't trust it enough to feel like I can eat 2300-2900 calories and MAINTAIN. My TDEE based on the scooby calculators (and taking body fat into the equation) is 2300-2650, and that doesn't take into account that I'm on my feet a lot of the day. But, something has to change, obviously, so I will just do as you guys suggest and measure and weigh everything for a week and see how it goes. Then I'll re-evaluate at that point and bump my calories down if I need to. :)
  • angiek123
    angiek123 Posts: 29 Member
    Also, I haven't been overly concerned about the scale since I was hoping for a newbie re-comp, but that doesn't seem to be in the cards for me.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    To get a sense if the BodyMedia sensors work correctly for you at all.

    Look at your night time calorie burn per min. Find the average low, like if it alterates between 1.1 and 1.2, you know it's trying to show 1.15.
    Take that average low x 1440 - that's the BMR it's using.

    How would that compare to your Katch BMR based on bodyfat estimate?

    Because the Bodymedia does indeed try to adjust by looking at your temps - but it can only adjust so much.

    Then find some daytime sitting block of time, watching TV or such where there is good steady low value. Same thing, find the average low value per min.
    Take that awake resting low x 1440 - that's the RMR is't calculating.

    RMR should be about 150-250 more than BMR - if the sensors are working well.

    Also look at your section time and graph for intensity and METs for like a workout day.
    Does it show the increased level when the workout started and it remaining high? 3 and above METS is not that intense, and almost any cardio workout should have that shown totally.
    Lifting should at least show the time of the activity.

    If those 3 things don't pan out for you - it's likely not getting good enough sensor readings. Mine never did. I've had several show success when they adjusted their height to cause the initial BMR it starts with to match their Katch BMR, and then the other stuff all got better.
    But if the BMR and RMR are the same, and you notice most time that should be RMR is BMR level - the sensors aren't reading temp well at all. Likely inflated.