Government might send you to slimming classes

Wonderob
Wonderob Posts: 1,372 Member
Interesting development in UK, with the Government exploring the idea of paying to send overweight people to slimming classes.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-27586149

"The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) wants overweight people sent to slimming classes with the aim of a 3% weight loss.

NICE said even such a small loss - probably of just a few pounds - would cut blood pressure and reduce the risk of type-2 diabetes and some cancers.

Two in three adults in England are overweight - with a BMI higher than 25."
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Replies

  • sneaks
    sneaks Posts: 19
    Is this new? They've been doing GP referral for years. I've had it due to back problems. I think if they really want people to engage with it though I think fitness needs to be seen as something that is affordable and not for the latte swigging middle classes. I know anyone can get out and walk/jog/cycle, but I think gyms are far too overpriced. Wouldn't mind a no frills gym where it was £1 an entry or something!
  • dammitjanet0161
    dammitjanet0161 Posts: 319 Member
    Agree with sneaks, it must be a slow news day today as this isn't really new.
  • oneoddsock
    oneoddsock Posts: 321 Member
    I thought it was a convenient excuse to avoid teaching people about proper nutrition & exercise - from what I've heard, slimming clubs don't actually address that particular knowledge gap.
  • slk_5555
    slk_5555 Posts: 177 Member
    I think GP's have been referring patients to Weight Watchers for a while. I agree that any weight watchers meeting I went to, the leaders had no nutritional knowledge what so ever. Also whilst I was at weight watchers, I was basically on very low cals (1200 a day) - not sustainable or healthy. I don't know what is taught at schools in terms of nutrition, but I really think education is key - we have far too many kids that don't even know the names of basic vegetables and certainly don't know where milk comes from. How can we expect future generations to make healthy choices, if they don't know what is healthy or not.

    With regard to exercise. There is plenty of free exercise out there in the form of running, cycling, walking, DVD's - so saying that you can't afford to exercise is a complete cop out as far as I am concerned. Plus, in terms of weight loss being the primary goal, diet is the major priority. You don't have to exercise to loose weight.
  • ruqayyahsmum
    ruqayyahsmum Posts: 1,514 Member
    The news i watched focused more on the 3% loss and telling people to aim to just lose 3% long term instead of yo yo dieting

    GP referrals for slimming clubs and/or 12 week gym programs has been around for years now although it tends to be aimed at the morbidly obese when many others could benefit from it
  • KarenJanine
    KarenJanine Posts: 3,497 Member
    Some CCGs (and previously PCTs) have been doing this for years.

    The advice about losing a small amount of weight and focusing on keeping it off is good. However I don't agree that Weight Watchers is the best option for this - their diet plans are usually fairly aggressive with many dieters having to go back and re-join year after year when they weight keeps going back on. There is a reason such companies are so good at making money, and that's the repeat customers.

    It would be far better if classes were devised where a dietitian and fitness instructor both educated people on sustainable diet and exercise, rather than giving money to private companies.
  • motivatedmartha
    motivatedmartha Posts: 1,108 Member
    I know this is going to make me sound REALLY old and 'back in the day' ish - but when I was at school we were taught the main meal preparation skills ie baking using creaming, rubbing in and whisking methods, and how different cooking methods affected the nutrition of the foods we were preparing - steaming, grilling, poaching, boiling roasting etc. We were also required to produce a balanced family menu for a week and plan the shopping for it. All our menus had to be costed!

    Things may have changed since my children were at school but at 13, both of mine (1 boy, 1 girl) were, amongst similar projects required

    i) to design, draw and then make a pizza (using a bought pizza base), and then to carry out a survey on the resultant taste

    ii) using pre purchased bread product(s) - design an animal, make it and carry out a survey on how it looked and tasted (mine made a snake made out of small bread rolls and a piggy head from a cottage loaf.

    These were both fun, design based projects which taught them a bit about planning, execution and evaluation, but taught them not one thing about nutrition and the life skill of proper food preparation.

    I can remember the shock my mother had when were were required to bake a Victoria sandwich packet mix but, the following week we had to make one from scratch and then compare the 2 products for taste, appearance and cost to make. I learned a lot from that!
  • _Zardoz_
    _Zardoz_ Posts: 3,987 Member
    I bet WW HQ and slimming world are breaking open the champagne all that lovely tax payers money. Especially considering the failure rate on WW is very high so even repeat custom.
  • dammitjanet0161
    dammitjanet0161 Posts: 319 Member
    I know this is going to make me sound REALLY old and 'back in the day' ish - but when I was at school we were taught the main meal preparation skills ie baking using creaming, rubbing in and whisking methods, and how different cooking methods affected the nutrition of the foods we were preparing - steaming, grilling, poaching, boiling roasting etc. We were also required to produce a balanced family menu for a week and plan the shopping for it. All our menus had to be costed!

    Things may have changed since my children were at school but at 13, both of mine (1 boy, 1 girl) were, amongst similar projects required

    i) to design, draw and then make a pizza (using a bought pizza base), and then to carry out a survey on the resultant taste

    ii) using pre purchased bread product(s) - design an animal, make it and carry out a survey on how it looked and tasted (mine made a snake made out of small bread rolls and a piggy head from a cottage loaf.

    These were both fun, design based projects which taught them a bit about planning, execution and evaluation, but taught them not one thing about nutrition and the life skill of proper food preparation.

    I can remember the shock my mother had when were were required to bake a Victoria sandwich packet mix but, the following week we had to make one from scratch and then compare the 2 products for taste, appearance and cost to make. I learned a lot from that!

    Lol, I am also of a "certain age" and I agree that the lessons nowadays are very different and less practical than what I had. However, I also remember that pretty much most of what I cooked at school was variations on cakes, pastry and bread, and very little on savoury foods and what you might eat for a balanced meal.

    (btw I remember my mum being disgusted that one week we made sausage rolls from frozen puff pastry and frozen sausage meat, demanding to know where the skill was in that since we weren't making the puff pastry ourselves. My sausage rolls never even got made because I had forgotten to defrost the sausage meat before the lesson so I spent all the lesson desperately trying to defrost the meat! :embarassed: I went way off topic there but thanks for the nostalgia motivatedmartha! )
  • slk_5555
    slk_5555 Posts: 177 Member
    I know this is going to make me sound REALLY old and 'back in the day' ish - but when I was at school we were taught the main meal preparation skills ie baking using creaming, rubbing in and whisking methods, and how different cooking methods affected the nutrition of the foods we were preparing - steaming, grilling, poaching, boiling roasting etc. We were also required to produce a balanced family menu for a week and plan the shopping for it. All our menus had to be costed!

    Things may have changed since my children were at school but at 13, both of mine (1 boy, 1 girl) were, amongst similar projects required

    i) to design, draw and then make a pizza (using a bought pizza base), and then to carry out a survey on the resultant taste

    ii) using pre purchased bread product(s) - design an animal, make it and carry out a survey on how it looked and tasted (mine made a snake made out of small bread rolls and a piggy head from a cottage loaf.

    These were both fun, design based projects which taught them a bit about planning, execution and evaluation, but taught them not one thing about nutrition and the life skill of proper food preparation.

    I can remember the shock my mother had when were were required to bake a Victoria sandwich packet mix but, the following week we had to make one from scratch and then compare the 2 products for taste, appearance and cost to make. I learned a lot from that!

    Yeah...we did home economics. Maybe because it was a girls school. But we were taught about planning & cooking a meal, including nutrition. We were also taught the nutritional requirements of children, the elderly (whatever that means) and pregnant women. I might not always eat the right things as an adult, but I do have the knowledge to know which foods I should be eating.

    With regard to WW. I slowly decided that from a business perspective, it was in WW best interest to retain its members for as long as possible - which meant that my weight loss goal, was not really their priority.
  • emmaxbon
    emmaxbon Posts: 123 Member
    I know this is going to make me sound REALLY old and 'back in the day' ish - but when I was at school we were taught the main meal preparation skills ie baking using creaming, rubbing in and whisking methods, and how different cooking methods affected the nutrition of the foods we were preparing - steaming, grilling, poaching, boiling roasting etc. We were also required to produce a balanced family menu for a week and plan the shopping for it. All our menus had to be costed!

    Things may have changed since my children were at school but at 13, both of mine (1 boy, 1 girl) were, amongst similar projects required

    i) to design, draw and then make a pizza (using a bought pizza base), and then to carry out a survey on the resultant taste

    ii) using pre purchased bread product(s) - design an animal, make it and carry out a survey on how it looked and tasted (mine made a snake made out of small bread rolls and a piggy head from a cottage loaf.

    These were both fun, design based projects which taught them a bit about planning, execution and evaluation, but taught them not one thing about nutrition and the life skill of proper food preparation.

    I can remember the shock my mother had when were were required to bake a Victoria sandwich packet mix but, the following week we had to make one from scratch and then compare the 2 products for taste, appearance and cost to make. I learned a lot from that!

    Completely agree with you. I am on a household budgeting board on FB and the lack of knowledge about food, food prep, recipes etc is shocking. I was lucky in that my parents and my nanas both taught me the basics and then some, but we also had home economics lessons in school which did basic ingredients and recipes. Its a shame its not something which appears to be taught anymore.
  • sneaks
    sneaks Posts: 19
    It is taught, but it's one of those lessons which is a bit easy, so I don't think a lot of it goes in!

    TBH, I have all my cooking knowledge from my mum and grandma, and all my nutrition knowledge from various attempts at diets and medical issues. My husband who is the same age as me, so went through the same education system, didn't even know what a carb was when I met him!
  • KylaDenay
    KylaDenay Posts: 1,585 Member
    My mother lives in Australia and they just announced on the news yesterday that the Government is going to pay 3 months worth of Weight Watchers for overweight people. I think that is ridiculous and I would not be a happy taxpayer! Just send them all to MFP.

    If they really wanted it, they would already be on here.
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,742 Member
    I'm in the USA and find it kind of charming that the UK calls this "slimming class"

    Here, they would probably call it something ultra dramatic like "Mandatory Obesity Management Course"
  • 0somuchbetter0
    0somuchbetter0 Posts: 1,335 Member
    I'm in the USA and find it kind of charming that the UK calls this "slimming class"

    Here, they would probably call it something ultra dramatic like "Mandatory Obesity Management Course"

    This actually made me LOL, literally. I was thinking the same thing re "slimming class." So quaint and proper. :)

    Not to hijack the thread, but my hub (aged 55) had to take a class in high school called "bachelor living" (while the girls took home economics). In it, he learned how to iron a shirt, make a bed, sew a button, polish shoes, and bake biscuits. (American biscuits, not cookies...kind of like scones but not as good.) I'm only 7 years younger than him but I'm appalled!

    Everything I learned about cooking and nutrition I learned on my own or from my mother, never at school.
  • emzilee
    emzilee Posts: 96 Member
    My mum was given vouchers for free Slimming World classes. I think they gave her 8 or 12 weeks, and if she lost a certain amount of weight, they gave her another 8 weeks. She continued with the classes after that and lost about 4 stone.

    Since then she's stopped (work commitments, having to move to another class with an instructor she didn't like, excuses and so on) and she's put all of the weight back on.

    I went to see the doctor and asked if they could give me any similar support and they said no (I live in Leeds).
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,742 Member
    I'm in the USA and find it kind of charming that the UK calls this "slimming class"

    Here, they would probably call it something ultra dramatic like "Mandatory Obesity Management Course"

    This actually made me LOL, literally. I was thinking the same thing re "slimming class." So quaint and proper. :)

    Not to hijack the thread, but my hub (aged 55) had to take a class in high school called "bachelor living" (while the girls took home economics). In it, he learned how to iron a shirt, make a bed, sew a button, polish shoes, and bake biscuits. (American biscuits, not cookies...kind of like scones but not as good.) I'm only 7 years younger than him but I'm appalled!

    Everything I learned about cooking and nutrition I learned on my own or from my mother, never at school.

    I know 55 isn't that old, really, but to me that sounds almost cool for back then...better than the school just assuming that every man would find a wife immediately following high school who would take care of him from then on ;-) LOL

    I learned lots about nutrition at school (even in college) and paid absolutely zero attention to all of it. I've learned more from my husband and this website in the past year and a half, because I'm actually interested.

    Similar situation with cooking! My mom taught me to bake very young but she wasn't a great cook and didn't teach me much about that. Other female relatives tried, but I wasn't interested. I finally learned through trial & error and following recipes when I was in my mid to late 20's and have since learned more from my husband who has always been into cooking.

    Home ec though was a big joke in my school in the early to mid 90's. It was basically a class where we memorized terms like crepe, moussaka, fillet, and types of knives for quizzes and then made instant mashed potatoes, fish sticks, salad, and Kool-Aid or iced tea (not kidding).
  • 0somuchbetter0
    0somuchbetter0 Posts: 1,335 Member
    I'm in the USA and find it kind of charming that the UK calls this "slimming class"

    Here, they would probably call it something ultra dramatic like "Mandatory Obesity Management Course"

    This actually made me LOL, literally. I was thinking the same thing re "slimming class." So quaint and proper. :)

    Not to hijack the thread, but my hub (aged 55) had to take a class in high school called "bachelor living" (while the girls took home economics). In it, he learned how to iron a shirt, make a bed, sew a button, polish shoes, and bake biscuits. (American biscuits, not cookies...kind of like scones but not as good.) I'm only 7 years younger than him but I'm appalled!

    Everything I learned about cooking and nutrition I learned on my own or from my mother, never at school.

    I know 55 isn't that old, really, but to me that sounds almost cool for back then...better than the school just assuming that every man would find a wife immediately following high school who would take care of him from then on ;-) LOL

    I learned lots about nutrition at school (even in college) and paid absolutely zero attention to all of it. I've learned more from my husband and this website in the past year and a half, because I'm actually interested.

    Similar situation with cooking! My mom taught me to bake very young but she wasn't a great cook and didn't teach me much about that. Other female relatives tried, but I wasn't interested. I finally learned through trial & error and following recipes when I was in my mid to late 20's and have since learned more from my husband who has always been into cooking.

    Home ec though was a big joke in my school in the early to mid 90's. It was basically a class where we memorized terms like crepe, moussaka, fillet, and types of knives for quizzes and then made instant mashed potatoes, fish sticks, salad, and Kool-Aid or iced tea (not kidding).

    Funny thing about my husband...he still won't iron or make the bed or sew a button or any of that other stuff. He's totally useless in the kitchen and our household duties are totally split along traditional gender lines. :grumble: I used to blame his mom for doing everything for him, but he has a brother who is Mr. Helpful Handyman around the house -- and he can even cook! Oh well...love my hub even if he is useless. LOL

    My mom is a pretty good cook and taught me the basics. I've always loved to cook so I've just taught myself over the years. As for nutrition, I started dieting in college to lose weight (when I was a size 6...go figure) so I read everything I could get my hands on about nutrition. Never took a home ec course, and I graduated from high school in 1983. Just wasn't stressed in my school I guess...
  • Commander_Keen
    Commander_Keen Posts: 1,181 Member

    Completely agree with you. I am on a household budgeting board on FB and the lack of knowledge about food, food prep, recipes etc is shocking. I was lucky in that my parents and my nanas both taught me the basics and then some, but we also had home economics lessons in school which did basic ingredients and recipes. Its a shame its not something which appears to be taught anymore.
    I dont' think its a lack of knowledge I believe its an attitude of " I don't care"
    If people really cared about weight loss or was concerned, then all they would have to do, is find the time to walk 30min.
    or instead of parking next to the store they could park at the furthest parking spot and substitute 1 meal for a plain salad ( no dressing) . But they don't.. because they don't care.
  • Wonderob
    Wonderob Posts: 1,372 Member
    If people really cared about weight loss or was concerned, then all they would have to do, is find the time to walk 30min.
    or instead of parking next to the store they could park at the furthest parking spot and substitute 1 meal for a plain salad ( no dressing) . But they don't.. because they don't care.

    Nothing wrong with walking a bit extra for possibly a slightly healthier lifestyle - but as far as weight loss goes it's almost insignificant and certainly not "all you have to do"

    30 minutes of walking for me would burn 50 calories more than if I took the car! All the would do is slightly slow the weight gain down.