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Aerobic vs Anaerobic Time?

delpha2delpha2 Posts: 42Member Posts: 42Member
So, everything I've read says that in order for a cardio workout to be truly effective you should do it for 20 minutes minimum.

What about anaerobic exercise? How long do we need to lift weights in order to see the benefits?

Trying to find a balance between the two (and perhaps a more efficient way of working out).

-D

Replies

  • delpha2delpha2 Posts: 42Member Posts: 42Member
    So, everything I've read says that in order for a cardio workout to be truly effective you should do it for 20 minutes minimum.

    What about anaerobic exercise? How long do we need to lift weights in order to see the benefits?

    Trying to find a balance between the two (and perhaps a more efficient way of working out).

    -D
  • DoozieDoozie Posts: 53Member Posts: 53Member
    Anaerobic is when you are working out above your maximum heart rate. Very high intensity which you should not be able to stay at for a long period of time.
    This is not weight lifting :happy:
    A good balance is the cardio for at least 30 minutes 5 days a week and weight lifting 2/3 day per week. Of course you have to do what works best for you and you time. :tongue:
  • wanderinglightwanderinglight Posts: 1,247Member Member Posts: 1,247Member Member
    Actually, Delpha is right, weightlifting is an anaerobic activity. I believe Doozie is talking about the anaerobic zone when training with a heart rate monitor. Delpha -- I've heard that it's good to incorporate weights several times a week -- I usually aim for 3x week for about 30 minutes at a time. I try to do them after my cardio, when my heart rate is already up.

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    Anaerobic Exercise (including Sprinting, Weight Lifting, and Bodybuiding)
    Anaerobic Exercise is a short-term, high intensity activity. Sprinting, heavy weight lifting, interval training, and jumping rope are all examples of anaerobic exercise. Anaerobic exercise means “exercise without oxygen.” During an intense physical activity, there is a shortage of oxygen because the amount of oxygen needed exceeds the oxygen that is available. This temporary shortage triggers lactic acid. Lactic acid is a by product of producing anaerobic exercise.

    When you engage in anaerobic exercise, you are exercising at an intensity that can only be sustained for a short time. The limit for this short burst of activity is usually 30 seconds to 2 minutes.

    Anaerobic exercise is excellent for building strength and creating muscle mass, and, like aerobic exercise, it still benefits the heart and lungs. It burns slightly less calories than aerobic exercise and is slightly less beneficial than cardiovascular activity; however, it is still very good for you. I’ll list a few reasons below.

    Continually Burn Calories

    With anaerobic exercise, you can continually burn calories hours after the exercise is over. Why? Your metabolism will continue to work for added time after your exercise. With aerobic exercise, you stop burning calories once your workout is completed. Do you want to kick it up a notch? Add interval training to your anaerobic exercise routine.

    Here's another link outlining the different training zones:
    http://www.brianmac.co.uk/hrm1.htm
  • songbyrdsweetsongbyrdsweet Posts: 5,691Member Member Posts: 5,691Member Member
    Resistance training is just one type of anaerobic activity. If you want to improve your anaerobic capacity, you can perform sprinting intervals and plyometrics as well.

    The adaptations we generally aim for with resistance training (increased muscle mass, increased strength) are a product of intensity, rest time, and rep ranges...these are also known as 'quality.' The adaptations only relate to time in terms of rests...total time spent with the weights, or 'quantity', has little to do with making these adaptations. In other words...it's not how long, but how HARD you work, that promotes improvement. Depending on your goals, you'll take longer or shorter rests, perform fewer or more reps, etc. You could benefit equally from a workout lasting 20 minutes or 60 minutes depending on your goals. 20 minutes of sprinting can be as beneficial as 45 minutes of lifting, but will cause different adaptations, which is why you have to decide on a specific goal and use your training to meet it.
  • DoozieDoozie Posts: 53Member Posts: 53Member
    I do apoligize for the wrong information. :blushing:
    Thank you for explaining to me! Great info.
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