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working out but no loss

cashndamoneycashndamoney Posts: 3Member Posts: 3Member
I work out six days a week and burn about 700 calories each day, I have done this for about two weeks now, and I have gained 4 lbs!!! :( Any suggestions or help???

Replies

  • cashndamoneycashndamoney Posts: 3Member Posts: 3Member
    I work out six days a week and burn about 700 calories each day, I have done this for about two weeks now, and I have gained 4 lbs!!! :( Any suggestions or help???
  • wolfpacker27wolfpacker27 Posts: 1Member Posts: 1Member
    How may calories are you taking in, and what are the calorie ratios?
  • natterzdezignnatterzdezign Posts: 71Member Member Posts: 71Member Member
    It could be that you've been gaining muscle. Muscle actually weighs more than fat, so that could be the reason. Do you eat a lot of protein? I found that getting 80-100 grams of protein helps burn fat. I started using some of the Herbalife products (I thought it was a bunch of bologna at first, but after trying them, I've noticed a huge difference)

    Hope that helps! Email me if you want: [email protected]
  • astarte09astarte09 Posts: 531Member Member Posts: 531Member Member
    Muscle weighs more than fat. And if you are eating your workout cals, and you are not really burning that many calories, you could gain.
  • pixiestickpixiestick Posts: 839Member Member Posts: 839Member Member
    The answer: You are eating too much (not likely with 700 extra cals burned), you're not eating enough, or you are not eating the right kinds of food. Are you recording everything? what does that tell you?
  • songbyrdsweetsongbyrdsweet Posts: 5,691Member Member Posts: 5,691Member Member
    It's normal to put on weight when you start working out. It's not going to be muscle, as you won't experience growth until about 4 weeks of resistance training, and it's IF you're eating *extra* calories. And 4 lbs wouldn't happen in two weeks, it'd take about 8 months.

    What you experience when you start training is an increase in stored blood sugar in the muscles and liver, and the water it binds to. Your body is adapting to the new work load by holding onto potential energy to be better prepared for your next workout. It would go away if you stopped working out and cut down on carbohydrates, but then you'd experience muscle atrophy and it wouldn't be true fat loss, so don't do that. :smile:
  • crystal_sapphirecrystal_sapphire Posts: 1,205Member Member Posts: 1,205Member Member
    re you sure it's 700 calories you're burning? if you're using those elliptical and other machines at the gym as a guideline, they often overestimate
  • songbyrdsweetsongbyrdsweet Posts: 5,691Member Member Posts: 5,691Member Member
    re you sure it's 700 calories you're burning? if you're using those elliptical and other machines at the gym as a guideline, they often overestimate

    Very true! They can overestimate by up to 60%. I don't know of any machines that account for gender or height, and that makes a huge difference.
  • cashndamoneycashndamoney Posts: 3Member Posts: 3Member
    I do this thing called the crossramp, it's like a stairclimber, elliptical, and treadmill combined. I log in my weight and age and I work out 70 minutes to burn 700 calories, according to MFP, I should be burning near 900-1000 cals in that time, but I go by what the machine says.

    I eat about 1300-1600 a day, I cannot eat the whole 1900 calories MFP give me to eat w/ my exercise. I also have hypothyroidism so I'm assuming this is playing apart in it too. I'm hoping the scale will start going the other way in a week or so, I'll keep my fingers crossed! Thanks everyone!
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