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Weighing Meat and Fish

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Do you do it before or after you cook it? (I'm new to this whole cooking thing - seriously!)

For example, 100g of tuna steak has 136 calories. So I cooked 100g. But after I had cooked it it only weighed about 55g.

So, how do I know if I ate 136 calories or around 75 calories?

Replies

  • linda1243
    linda1243 Posts: 166
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    I weigh before because I know it shrinks during cooking, but I don't think the fat/calories disappear in the process, but I could be wrong.
  • vettle
    vettle Posts: 621 Member
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    I do before and after, just for curiosity sake. it weighs less when cooked. but when entering there's always a raw and a cooked version just in case\

    Tuna has barely any fat, so I would go with the raw amount. I can't imagine that much disappearing in fat through cooking. Plus, we usually add olive oil or something to it when cooking.
  • jellybaby84
    jellybaby84 Posts: 583 Member
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    Thank you
  • Pandorian
    Pandorian Posts: 2,055 MFP Moderator
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    See any restaurant menu you care to. They are generally careful to specify that the 1/4 weight (burgers at least) refers to weight before cooking.
    It's moisture that gets reduced as you cook it, starting out with a raw piece of meat, cooking it to blue rare it will weigh something less than initially but cooking it to well done it will weigh less, as its moisture (water) that comes out the calories aren't reduced though the weight is.
  • asyouseefit
    asyouseefit Posts: 1,265 Member
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    Before (or choose the cooked option if weighted after). Meat and fish lose water when cooking/baking but no calories!
  • Pandorian
    Pandorian Posts: 2,055 MFP Moderator
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    the trouble with most of the "cooked" options is you don't know that you've cooked it the same as the person entering it. Blue rare weighs more than well done and both are "cooked" according to personal taste.