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hmm this? and may be pregnant?

WISHFULTHINKINGWISHFULTHINKING Member Posts: 167 Member Posts: 167
im counting clories dieting and excercising
might be pregnant
i would like ot know should i change anything if i am pregnant?

Replies

  • WISHFULTHINKINGWISHFULTHINKING Member Posts: 167 Member Posts: 167
    im counting clories dieting and excercising
    might be pregnant
    i would like ot know should i change anything if i am pregnant?
  • chrissyhchrissyh Member Posts: 8,235 Member Member Posts: 8,235 Member
    if you are, check with your doctor and TamTastic would be a great help to you...
  • vonzovonzo Member Posts: 161 Member Posts: 161
    You should eat enough calories for maintaining weight. You don't need any extra calories until much later on in the pregnancy and even then it's only around 300 extra. As for exercise, if your body is used to exercise then you can carry on but try not to do anything too high impact. Horse riding and cycling "should" be avoided but I know that many people still continue. Seeing a Dr would be your best bet and he/she will give you the run down of the do's and don'ts. :smile:
    Congrats if you are :flowerforyou:
  • Phoenix_RisingPhoenix_Rising Member Posts: 11,519 Member Member Posts: 11,519 Member
    You should eat enough calories for maintaining weight. You don't need any extra calories until much later on in the pregnancy and even then it's only around 300 extra. As for exercise, if your body is used to exercise then you can carry on but try not to do anything too high impact. Horse riding and cycling "should" be avoided but I know that many people still continue. Seeing a Dr would be your best bet and he/she will give you the run down of the do's and don'ts. :smile:
    Congrats if you are :flowerforyou:

    Nope, you do need extra calories early on, and you need to make sure you are taking pre-natal vitamins as well. I believe it's an estimated 500 extra calories during pregnancy.

    Best bet: take a pregnancy test, find out for sure, then ask your OBGYN about your diet during the first visit. If you are obese, they may still want you to lose weight during your pregnancy. The docs can advise you best how many calories to eat while pregnant, as well as what exercises to avoid during each trimester.
  • vonzovonzo Member Posts: 161 Member Posts: 161
    You should eat enough calories for maintaining weight. You don't need any extra calories until much later on in the pregnancy and even then it's only around 300 extra. As for exercise, if your body is used to exercise then you can carry on but try not to do anything too high impact. Horse riding and cycling "should" be avoided but I know that many people still continue. Seeing a Dr would be your best bet and he/she will give you the run down of the do's and don'ts. :smile:
    Congrats if you are :flowerforyou:

    Nope, you do need extra calories early on, and you need to make sure you are taking pre-natal vitamins as well. I believe it's an estimated 500 extra calories during pregnancy.

    Best bet: take a pregnancy test, find out for sure, then ask your OBGYN about your diet during the first visit. If you are obese, they may still want you to lose weight during your pregnancy. The docs can advise you best how many calories to eat while pregnant, as well as what exercises to avoid during each trimester.

    During pregnancy, your basal metabolic rate (BMR, or the number of calories you use each day) will increase, and you'll need more calories to support the extra work needed for fetal development. During the first trimester, most women usually don't need to increase their usual daily intake of calories (i.e., 1,800 to 2,000 calories) unless they need to compensate for starting a pregnancy underweight. But even if extra calories aren't consumed in the first trimester, you should still make balanced nutrition part of your daily wellness plan.

    During the second and third trimesters, you will need an extra 200 to 300 calories each day. But that doesn't mean feeling uncomfortably full: for example, just one piece of toast and a banana can supply those extra calories.

    There are exceptions to the extra-calories rule: women who start out under- or overweight, women who are very physically active, and women with certain medical conditions should talk to their doctor about specific caloric needs.
  • vonzovonzo Member Posts: 161 Member Posts: 161
    I also found this, it may help too

    Fine-tune your diet - even if you already eat well


    Now that you're a mum-to-be, it's important to try and increase your intake of certain vitamins and minerals (such as folic acid and iron). You may also need to slightly increase your calorie intake as your pregnancy progresses.

    If your diet is poor to begin with, it is even more important to make the transition to eating nutritious, well-balanced meals. Limit junk food, as it offers little more than empty calories, which means calories with few or no nutrients. (Visit our eating well section for some easy, healthy recipe ideas.)

    Your body becomes more efficient when you're expecting a baby and makes even better use of the energy you obtain from the food you eat. The average woman does not need any extra calories for the first six months of pregnancy and only about 200 extra calories per day for the last three months.

    Two hundred calories is equivalent to:

    • two slices of wholemeal toast and margarine/butter
    • a jacket potato with an ounce of cheese
    • one slice of cheese on toast.

    Your own appetite is the best indication of how much food you need to eat. You may find your appetite fluctuates during the course of your pregnancy:
    In the first few weeks your appetite may fall away dramatically and you may not feel like eating proper meals, especially if you suffer from nausea or sickness.
    • During the middle part of your pregnancy your appetite may be the same as before you were pregnant or slightly increased.
    • Towards the end of your pregnancy your appetite will probably increase, but if you suffer from heartburn or a full feeling after eating you may find it helpful to have small frequent meals.

    The best rule to remember is to eat when you are hungry. Don't worry about your changing appetite as long as you are following the advice given about the type of food you need to eat and you are gaining weight at the appropriate rate, which your midwife or doctor will monitor
  • Phoenix_RisingPhoenix_Rising Member Posts: 11,519 Member Member Posts: 11,519 Member
    You should eat enough calories for maintaining weight. You don't need any extra calories until much later on in the pregnancy and even then it's only around 300 extra. As for exercise, if your body is used to exercise then you can carry on but try not to do anything too high impact. Horse riding and cycling "should" be avoided but I know that many people still continue. Seeing a Dr would be your best bet and he/she will give you the run down of the do's and don'ts. :smile:
    Congrats if you are :flowerforyou:

    Nope, you do need extra calories early on, and you need to make sure you are taking pre-natal vitamins as well. I believe it's an estimated 500 extra calories during pregnancy.

    Best bet: take a pregnancy test, find out for sure, then ask your OBGYN about your diet during the first visit. If you are obese, they may still want you to lose weight during your pregnancy. The docs can advise you best how many calories to eat while pregnant, as well as what exercises to avoid during each trimester.

    During pregnancy, your basal metabolic rate (BMR, or the number of calories you use each day) will increase, and you'll need more calories to support the extra work needed for fetal development. During the first trimester, most women usually don't need to increase their usual daily intake of calories (i.e., 1,800 to 2,000 calories) unless they need to compensate for starting a pregnancy underweight. But even if extra calories aren't consumed in the first trimester, you should still make balanced nutrition part of your daily wellness plan.

    That article is assuming you are eating 1800-2000 calories a day already, not dieting or eating at a caloric deficit.

    Me for example-- my base calories are 1200 per day plus exercise calories. If I were to get pregnant (involuntary shudder, my one is enough right now!!!), I'd need to go back up to round about 1800 calories a day, more than likely. Again, my OBGYN might tell me differently, depending on how much weight I need to lose to maintain a healthy weight for the pregnancy.
  • vonzovonzo Member Posts: 161 Member Posts: 161
    You should eat enough calories for maintaining weight. You don't need any extra calories until much later on in the pregnancy and even then it's only around 300 extra. As for exercise, if your body is used to exercise then you can carry on but try not to do anything too high impact. Horse riding and cycling "should" be avoided but I know that many people still continue. Seeing a Dr would be your best bet and he/she will give you the run down of the do's and don'ts. :smile:
    Congrats if you are :flowerforyou:

    Nope, you do need extra calories early on, and you need to make sure you are taking pre-natal vitamins as well. I believe it's an estimated 500 extra calories during pregnancy.

    Best bet: take a pregnancy test, find out for sure, then ask your OBGYN about your diet during the first visit. If you are obese, they may still want you to lose weight during your pregnancy. The docs can advise you best how many calories to eat while pregnant, as well as what exercises to avoid during each trimester.

    During pregnancy, your basal metabolic rate (BMR, or the number of calories you use each day) will increase, and you'll need more calories to support the extra work needed for fetal development. During the first trimester, most women usually don't need to increase their usual daily intake of calories (i.e., 1,800 to 2,000 calories) unless they need to compensate for starting a pregnancy underweight. But even if extra calories aren't consumed in the first trimester, you should still make balanced nutrition part of your daily wellness plan.

    That article is assuming you are eating 1800-2000 calories a day already, not dieting or eating at a caloric deficit.

    Me for example-- my base calories are 1200 per day plus exercise calories. If I were to get pregnant (involuntary shudder, my one is enough right now!!!), I'd need to go back up to round about 1800 calories a day, more than likely. Again, my OBGYN might tell me differently, depending on how much weight I need to lose to maintain a healthy weight for the pregnancy.

    That's why I said enough for maintaining weight :smile: Most of us are on redcued calories to lower our weight. If we wanted to maintain what we are right now we would be roughly at that level. :smile:
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