Fat Free vs Sugar Free.......?

Options
Which is better?

Obviously the answer will change based on health issues...sugar free would be better for a diabetic in most cases, but what about the rest of us average individuals who are trying to lose weight and get healthy?

Personally, I tend to look at the calories in each and purchase the one with the least amount of calories per serving - and it isn't always one or the other.

Wondering what other think and if there is a right choice! : :huh:

Replies

  • MoreBean13
    MoreBean13 Posts: 8,701 Member
    Options
    I personally try to avoid any diet foods, I just fit the whole versions in to my macros for the day. That being said, I generally have to add fat to my meals (coconut oil or PB) to even come close to my fat macro (I'm vegetarian) so I would choose sugar free if I had to pick between the two. Unless sugar free means sugar alcohols- those give me major digestive issues.
  • mfp_1
    mfp_1 Posts: 516 Member
    Options
    RedefiningMe wrote:
    I ... purchase the one with the least amount of calories per serving

    Manufacturers sometimes sneak a smaller serving onto the label than their competitors. So with 'per serving' you have to be alert for such tricks.

    That's why I prefer comparing values 'per 100 g'.
  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
    Options
    low fat is always high carb, carb is same as sugar so the two are polar opposites and I would rather have a higher fat low carb version.
  • lambertj
    lambertj Posts: 675 Member
    Options
    I used to go fat-free but found that it is the sugar that is bad for me, I actually lose weight with healthy fats. All low-fats or fat free foods have added sugar so I go for no-sugar whenever possible and only get sugar from fruits and veggies whenever possible.
  • brneydgrlie
    brneydgrlie Posts: 464 Member
    Options
    Low fat items generally have higher sugar and sodium contents to make up for the flavor lost from losing the fat. The body does not NEED additional sugar - it makes its own from the carbs you eat naturally. Fats on the other hand - GOOD fats like olive oil and avocado - are good for you in proper amounts. Fat helps you feel satisfied after a meal, can provide valuable Omega 3s, and can actually help fuel weight loss.
  • REET420
    REET420 Posts: 160 Member
    Options
    They add extra sugar and salt in fat free or low fat foods so they taste better. I saw this on Dr Oz and I checked when I went to the grocery store after seeing it on TV and it's true for most food. The ice cream and candy and **** that's low fat has more sugar and it adds up to the same calories. When I eat these things I try to eat organic because they use cane sugar instead of the refined crap or aspartame.
  • Martucha123
    Martucha123 Posts: 1,093 Member
    Options
    I eat only fat free and sugar free food

    fe sugar free butter and fat free cereals :D

    ok for real: I do not buy diet foods, fat reduced foods are usually packed with sodium (less fat means less flawour, so it's compensated by sodium) I guess the only fat reduced food I have is milk products, mayo and margarine, but I like how they taste more that way.

    Stay away from diet foods, incporporate real foods (fruits, veggies, meat, fish ect ect)

    my 2 cents
  • chevy88grl
    chevy88grl Posts: 3,937 Member
    Options
    Honestly? I avoid fat free and sugar free stuff - I just eat the real deal. I've found that fat free/sugar free things tend to have A LOT of other additives - a lot of which I can not even pronounce. So, I'll stick with the real thing.
  • bathsheba_c
    bathsheba_c Posts: 1,873 Member
    Options
    I've noticed that a lot of fat free versions of foods that do not easily lend themselves to being fat free add tons of sugar to make them taste good, especially baked goods. Sugar free tends to use lots of artificial sweeteners, which can affect the taste. I'm a fan of leaving food unaltered and using the really unhealthy stuff as an occasional treat.

    By the way, I think what the food item is can be really important. For example, I'd rather make popcorn at home than use the stuff from the supermarket, which has a lot more fat, even if it's "low-fat." Also, removing the fat from food can strip it of vitamins and minerals, which is why low-fat and skim milk are always enriched.
  • netchik
    netchik Posts: 587 Member
    Options
    I find that the full product has ingredients that are better for me anyway - I'm a diabetic, and will rarely go sugar free because the fat content is so high, and the use awful things like aspartame to sweeten. bad for you and they have an awful after taste.

    By the same token, fat-free compensates by loading with sugar.

    Bleurck.
  • Mmmporkrinds
    Mmmporkrinds Posts: 192
    Options
    RedefiningMe wrote:
    I ... purchase the one with the least amount of calories per serving

    Manufacturers sometimes sneak a smaller serving onto the label than their competitors. So with 'per serving' you have to be alert for such tricks.

    That's why I prefer comparing values 'per 100 g'.

    Good tip, thanks mfp_1
  • RedefiningMe
    RedefiningMe Posts: 44 Member
    Options
    Great replies, everyone! Thanks for your input! I am still transitioning out of processed foods (mainly snacks) into more natural "real deal" (as someone said) foods, so this feedback is very useful!

    Thanks again :~)
  • Mompanda4
    Mompanda4 Posts: 869 Member
    Options
    Bump
  • Gymboreee
    Gymboreee Posts: 23
    Options
    Neither lol Either have good carbs that don't come from sugar and if you have fats makes sure they're healthy fats.
  • StrawberrySt
    StrawberrySt Posts: 235
    Options
    Agree with everyone that has said steer clear of 'diet foods'

    I used to eat them a lot when I first started on here and thought I was doing well to keep my calories in check but now I eat whole foods and the full-fat versions and am usually fuller for longer and there is much less sodium and sugar in my diet!