Full-Time Career as a Personal Trainer?

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(I had also posted this under "Fitness and Exercise" but figured it may be in the wrong topic board)

I sit behind a desk all day at work (40+ hours/week), so of course that's how I originally packed on the pounds when I got this job 6 years ago.

I decided I'd like a career that's more active and rewarding, so I gave my résumé to Goodlife when I saw that they were hiring for a Membership Consultant position. Unfortunately, I didn't get the job, but 3 days later, they called me up wondering if I'd be interested in a position as a Personal Trainer.

At first I was thrilled to receive the news, but now I'm having second thoughts.

*****My interview is tomorrow morning, and I was wondering if there's anything I should know about this company or position that would deter me from taking the job.

I did some research last night, and there's a site called ratemyemployer. com which had a few hundred posts from past employees stating that they hated their experience there.

I'm curious to know if:

a.) The hours are decent
b.) You only get paid for your time in the gym IF you're training someone (no pay for recruiting?)
c.) Is there a decent work life/personal life balance? (Will my life revolve around my job, will I have to take a lot of work home, etc.)

I'm not happy with the current job I have now, but if taking this position means I'm even MORE stressed out and taking a major pay cut, I'm obviously not going to take the position. I've noticed that the PT I originally had sessions with, as well as the membership consultant that signed me up, have both left--I've been trying to get in contact with them to see if it was for personal reasons, or, if they just couldn't stand the environment anymore.

Any info or tips would be greatly appreciated!!

flowerforyou

Replies

  • odusgolp
    odusgolp Posts: 10,477 Member
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    I've got nothing.... but I love you and I'm excited that they even thought of you. That's cool!
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,670 Member
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    I do it part time, but could make a good living off of it doing it full time. I personally do it to help people and not because of the money.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 28+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  • jshort152
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    I'm a personal trainer and as for the hours, it depends. Don't quit your day job anytime soon. It takes awhile to build up clients and even then your schedule will be scattered to cater to the times they come in. Second, pay is pretty good but most gyms (like mine) pay you on commission only, so only the clients you train. What's more is that you have to take out taxes from your salary yourself usually and file quarterlies. With the costs to get certified and to get it started I would suggest you do as much as you can on the side first such as getting your certifications in order, then go to they gym, or see if they give you a grace period to get your cert. Otherwise it is tricky and will cost some money and time but after about 2 months it's honestly a pretty fun job. If you have any questions hmu! Hope this helps!

    Jesse Short
    ISSA Certified Personal Trainer
  • yoovie
    yoovie Posts: 17,121 Member
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    who cares do it for fun
  • TubbsMcGee
    TubbsMcGee Posts: 1,058 Member
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    Aww Odus you're awesome. I love you too!
  • TubbsMcGee
    TubbsMcGee Posts: 1,058 Member
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    I do it part time, but could make a good living off of it doing it full time. I personally do it to help people and not because of the money.

    Essentially, I would love to do it just to help people, but I'm only 23 and am also looking to buy another house...so I'm kind of money-hungry at the moment.

    Are you just training part time, or do you have a second job as well??
  • TubbsMcGee
    TubbsMcGee Posts: 1,058 Member
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    I'm a personal trainer and as for the hours, it depends. Don't quit your day job anytime soon. It takes awhile to build up clients and even then your schedule will be scattered to cater to the times they come in.
    This was what I was worried about. My hours are set from 8:30am-4:30pm, and due to the high stress of my current job, usually when I get home all I want to do is nap on the couch!
    Second, pay is pretty good but most gyms (like mine) pay you on commission only, so only the clients you train. What's more is that you have to take out taxes from your salary yourself usually and file quarterlies. With the costs to get certified and to get it started I would suggest you do as much as you can on the side first such as getting your certifications in order, then go to the gym, or see if they give you a grace period to get your cert. Otherwise it is tricky and will cost some money and time but after about 2 months it's honestly a pretty fun job. If you have any questions hmu! Hope this helps!

    Jesse Short
    ISSA Certified Personal Trainer

    This is a fantastic idea. I was actually kind of leaning towards this as well, being as after doing some research, I found out that Goodlife's PT program is unique to just their gym...meaning if I were to quit one day down the road and try to get a personal training job at another gym, I'd have to go out and get certified with a broader trainer firm.

    Thanks so much for all of your tips :)
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,670 Member
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    I do it part time, but could make a good living off of it doing it full time. I personally do it to help people and not because of the money.

    Essentially, I would love to do it just to help people, but I'm only 23 and am also looking to buy another house...so I'm kind of money-hungry at the moment.

    Are you just training part time, or do you have a second job as well??
    I have a "sugar momma" so I'm also the stay at home dad. But for about 15 hours a week I make $2500 a month take home. Again if I was full time, I make at least double that. I choose to be part time since I like my free time.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 28+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  • TubbsMcGee
    TubbsMcGee Posts: 1,058 Member
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    Completely understandable, Ninerbuff.

    If I were in your shoes, I'd do the exact same!
  • dad106
    dad106 Posts: 4,868 Member
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    I'm not trainer... but since I've had 3 in the past year, heres what I've gathered about the trainers at my gym(X sport Fitness).

    The trainers at my gym only get paid when they train and if a client buys a product and mentions that trainer, then they get a cut of the sale. How much they get paid is dependent on how many certifications they have... My trainer currently holds 3 I believe and is going for number 4.

    My trainer I believe works full time, but his hours are kind of crazy. He basically starts work in the afternoon, works to midnight, goes home, sleeps and does it again the next day. I believe he also works 6 days a week, and 8 hrs a day.. so it's about 50 hours a week.

    My trainers schedule may or may not be typical.. I really think it depends on how well known you are and how well you do as a trainer. Some trainers at my gym are horrible.. and then wonder why they can never keep clients. Others(like my trainer) are amazing and don't have room for all the people who want to train with them.. so they are constantly swapping clients based on who best fits when the client wants to train.

    Hope this info helps you!
  • TubbsMcGee
    TubbsMcGee Posts: 1,058 Member
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    Thanks for the info, dad106 :)

    I'll be sure to keep that in mind as well -- it doesn't sound like your trainer is able to have much of a social life. I'm sure his pay is decent though. If he's that in demand!!
  • sweetsungirl
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    Just another thought...be sure this is something you are PASSIONATE about first before you get into it. Keep in mind that you are not going to paid for the time it takes to put design client programs, research their health histories, contact their doctors, physiotherapists etc, if needed. You will be spending unpaid time with them before and after their sessions, hearing about their personal lives, their triumphs, their frustrations. Personal trainers are a lot like therapists...be sure you LOVE to care for, nurture, inform and educate people before you get into this line of work.

    also...I cant stress it enough: EDUCATION is extremely important. You may be working with a diverse clientele. You may get clients with diabetes, on medications, clients who have had heart attacks, arthritis, fibromyalgia etc . You will NEED to know how to design an exercise program for each and everyone of them. You must be passionate about helping all sorts of people, not just those that want to lose a few pounds.
  • dad106
    dad106 Posts: 4,868 Member
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    Thanks for the info, dad106 :)

    I'll be sure to keep that in mind as well -- it doesn't sound like your trainer is able to have much of a social life. I'm sure his pay is decent though. If he's that in demand!!

    No problem.

    I mean, my trainer does have a pretty decent social life(he was telling me how he went out last night!) but like the poster after me said, trainers are pretty much like therapists.

    I tell my trainer pretty much everything in my life.... and he is a pretty good sport about it. He knows when to give advice, when to roll his eyes and when to tell me to shut it!