Native American recipes?

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  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
  • Safari_Gal_
    Safari_Gal_ Posts: 1,455 Member
    NVintage wrote: »

    @NVintage - awesome!!! Thanks for sharing!
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    Taco Tuesday <3

  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,774 Member
    A bit off topic, but there's a great Top Chef (Boston season) Thanksgiving episode where they worked with traditional Wampanoag ingredients at Plimouth Plantation. Interesting discussion of traditional dishes from the Native American guests at the dinner they prepared (they also were limited to ingredients that would have been available to the Pilgrims and the cooking methods).

    https://observer.com/2014/11/top-chef-boston-12x6-recap-the-first-thanksgiving/
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member



  • JulieH70517
    JulieH70517 Posts: 8 Member
    Fry Bread Tacos! I wouldn't even try to count the calories. My idea of heaven is eating all the fry bread I want and not gain weight. :)
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    edited May 2021
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    I only feel safe foraging for pecans, blackberries, and wild onions. I remember as a kid, though, we'd eat crabapples, persimmons, and muscadines in the woods here in Georgia when we lived in rural areas. I haven't seen any of those for years, though. (maybe because I usually just hike at parks and botanical gardens instead of just exploring random wooded areas) I know natives in the Eastern U.S. would eat goosefoot aka lamb's quarters, for sure. and sunflower, marsh elder, and squash. Anyway, these 2 guys know hundreds of edible plants you can find for free! & I found their video interesting.
  • MaltedTea
    MaltedTea Posts: 6,287 Member
    While I don't hail from any of the First Nations, I'll do unspeakable things for bannock 🤤

    Here is a recipe from a gentleman's mother (her name is Jean). You can even email her your bannock questions and she'll answer because she's so nice. How is everyone's grandmother so sweet?! 😭

  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
  • NerdyScienceGrl
    NerdyScienceGrl Posts: 655 Member
    edited September 2021
    The key to good fry bread is water temperature to make the dough, rise time, and hot enough grease. I don’t personally make it but am a frybread snob at heart.

    Foods are going to be regional, recipes change by family, and influenced by colonization (government rations in the US- look up the history of fry bread and ag). If you look at your local, indigenous plants and wildlife, you’ll find what is/was served.

    One of my favorites is like chicken and dumplings but made with game instead and normally corn added. 🤤 Its the ultimate in comfort food.

    ETA: great video above! Worth the watch.

    Cookbook link: https://bookshop.org/lists/food-sovereignty-cookbooks

    You can find more and recipes by looking at sites that talk about food sovereignty.
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    Thanks for the link! I read the one by Mihesuah, and it's one of my favorites. I'll check out some of those other ones.
    The key to good fry bread is water temperature to make the dough, rise time, and hot enough grease. I don’t personally make it but am a frybread snob at heart.

    Foods are going to be regional, recipes change by family, and influenced by colonization (government rations in the US- look up the history of fry bread and ag). If you look at your local, indigenous plants and wildlife, you’ll find what is/was served.

    One of my favorites is like chicken and dumplings but made with game instead and normally corn added. 🤤 Its the ultimate in comfort food.

    ETA: great video above! Worth the watch.

    Cookbook link: https://bookshop.org/lists/food-sovereignty-cookbooks

    You can find more and recipes by looking at sites that talk about food sovereignty.

  • sally_jeffswife
    sally_jeffswife Posts: 766 Member
    Three Sisters Stew (Is kinda similar to Chili)- Veggie Broth,Tomatoe Puree,Yellow Corn,Cumin,1 Tbsp Coconut Oil,1 Yellow Onion,1 Red Bell Pepper,Minced Garlic,Sundried Tomatoes in PineNuts,Chile Flakes,Paprika,Black Beans-3 cans,Canned Squash,Can Sweet Potatoes, Can Pumpkin,Can Carrots,Coconut Milk,Oregano,Cilantro,Sage,Chili Powder,Sea Salt, Black Pepper,Smoked Pulled Pork
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
  • NYPhotographer2021
    NYPhotographer2021 Posts: 282 Member
    OMG! What I wouldn't give for NDN Tacos right now!!! Unfortunately, I'm eating Keto so that is definitely a no-no! But when I get down to goal...watch out!!

    Indian hash is a favorite in my family. It's basically just meat (Hamburg or other ground meat/sausage), onions, potatoes and either sage or savory. It's like mashed potatoes with the meat and other stuff. Can also be made into a pie. Oh, so good!

    Corn soup/corn bread...I miss all these foods from my hometown! Thanksgiving is going to be non-keto day and I'll deal with the aftermath later. But need my homefoods!!
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    edited November 2021
    I have done a whole month of Indigenous foods before, and lost a bit of weight! This month I'm just doing the 10 days leading up to Thanksgiving. I think it's a fun thing to do, especially with kids, to celebrate American Indian heritage and Thanksgiving!

  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,424 Member
    Some Common Foods
    • Wild rice
    • Corn
    • Maple
    • Sunflower
    • Pumpkin
    • Squash
    • Berries
    • Wild Leeks
    • Beans
    • Sweet potatoes
    • Pecans
    • Turkey
    • Sunchokes
    • Venison
    • Bison
    • Fish

    https://foodsovereigntycom.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/decolonizing_our_diet.pdf