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How do I drive my paleo coworker crazy?

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Lucylaser
Lucylaser Posts: 94 Member
Started a new job last week. Sharing a tiny office with a crazy paleo guy. He spent the day lecturing me about beans making ricin and leeching nutrients from my colon.

He is VERY preachy and I just don't need that. I am not a junk food person at all, I eat mainly just good home prepared food. I really don't believe the hype about eating such extreme diets where you cut out so many foods and eat so much bacon and steak. Not my thing.

I'd really like to have a bit of info to toss back at him when his mouth keeps flapping and all of this nonsense tumbles out. Any ideas?
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Replies

  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 10,034 Member
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    That will probably make it worse, I would just give unrelated responses. :happy:

    If you really need/want some ammo, then it would be better or even imperative, if you were specific......BTW paleo is not about eating bacon and steak.
  • kfesta52
    kfesta52 Posts: 98 Member
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    Oh geez, sounds like fun. My advice is the same thing I tell my husband when the kids are pushing his buttons - do not engage!

    Just do not engage. Let him burn himself out, anything else will just feed the fire. The best response to anything related to the topic is just a polite yet disinterested and completely non-committal "hmmm", and change the subject or get back to work.

    Good luck!
  • Lucylaser
    Lucylaser Posts: 94 Member
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    That will probably make it worse, I would just give unrelated responses. :happy:

    If you really need/want some ammo, then it would be better or even imperative, if you were specific......BTW paleo is not about eating bacon and steak.

    He seems to think that steak and bacon are hugely important. Along with veggies that are not potatoes (which I am way onto).

    Unrelated responses do seem like a good idea. But I'd really like to let him know how annoying he is.
  • fishnbrah
    fishnbrah Posts: 550
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    there probably wont be anything you can say to change his mind if he is brainwashed into the paleo thing. if you know about calculating macros you could tell him about that. or just show him pics of jacked dudes that eat pop tarts everyday
  • MarisaDLS2
    MarisaDLS2 Posts: 108 Member
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    Ricin comes from the castor bean.

    "One of the most dangerous poisons known, ricin, is a lectin derived from the seeds of the castor bean Ricinus communis (not a true bean and totally unrelated to the legume family Fabaceae); this is not, however, the same lectin found in beans and other legumes.

    Kidney beans and fava beans do not have ricin, they have a lectin (protein) called phytohemagglutinin (PHA), which is toxic but only if the beans are eaten raw or not boiled.

    Lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) can also be quite dangerous when consumed raw, but in this case the culprit is a different toxin altogether: linamarin, a cyanogenic glucoside."

    Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2385/#ixzz2SlmF0wMk

    Obviously he is not a "Breaking Bad" fan, otherwise he would know this key fact about ricin :wink:

    There was also a very lengthy study done in China, correlating high animal protein intake with increased rates of cancer.
    (Please note I did not state "causing")

    "The China Study (2005) is a book by T. Colin Campbell, Jacob Gould Schurman Professor Emeritus of Nutritional Biochemistry at Cornell University, and his son Thomas M. Campbell II, a physician. It examines the relationship between the consumption of animal products and a variety of chronic illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancers of the breast, prostate and bowel.[2] The book had sold 750,000 copies as of January 2013.[3] It is one of America's best-selling books about nutrition.[4]

    The China Study of the title is taken from the China-Cornell-Oxford Project, a 20-year study that began in 1983 and was conducted jointly by the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, Cornell University, and the University of Oxford.[5] T. Colin Campbell was one of the directors of the project, described by The New York Times in 1990 as "the Grand Prix of epidemiology".[6]

    The study examined mortality rates from 48 forms of cancer and other chronic diseases from 1973 to 75 in 65 counties in China, and correlated them with 1983–84 dietary surveys and bloodwork from 6,500 people, 100 from each county.

    It concluded that counties with a high consumption of animal-based foods in 1983–84 were more likely to have had higher death rates from "Western" diseases as of 1973–75, while the opposite was true for counties that ate more plant foods in 1983–84. The study was conducted in those counties because they had genetically similar populations that tended, over generations, to live in the same way in the same place, and eat diets specific to those regions.[7]

    The authors conclude that people who eat a plant-based/vegan diet—avoiding animal products such as beef, pork, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, and milk, and reducing their intake of processed foods and refined carbohydrates—will escape, reduce or reverse the development of chronic diseases. They also recommend adequate amounts of sunshine to maintain sufficient levels of vitamin D, and supplements of vitamin B12 in case of complete avoidance of animal products. They criticize low-carb diets, such as the Atkins diet, which include restrictions on the percentage of calories derived from complex carbohydrates.[8]"

    This information is also repeated in Joel Fuhrman's "Eat to Live" book.
  • Hezzietiger1
    Hezzietiger1 Posts: 1,256 Member
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    Ricin comes from the castor bean.

    "One of the most dangerous poisons known, ricin, is a lectin derived from the seeds of the castor bean Ricinus communis (not a true bean and totally unrelated to the legume family Fabaceae); this is not, however, the same lectin found in beans and other legumes.

    Kidney beans and fava beans do not have ricin, they have a lectin (protein) called phytohemagglutinin (PHA), which is toxic but only if the beans are eaten raw or not boiled.

    Lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) can also be quite dangerous when consumed raw, but in this case the culprit is a different toxin altogether: linamarin, a cyanogenic glucoside."

    Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2385/#ixzz2SlmF0wMk

    Obviously he is not a "Breaking Bad" fan, otherwise he would know this key fact about ricin :wink:

    Just print this.. lol
  • zombiemusicgirl
    zombiemusicgirl Posts: 98 Member
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    Just agree with everything he says. I have some newly converted vegan friends. While I totally support them, they do tend to get a bit preachy when someone asks why there isn't cheese on their pizza. Then it's no holds barred vegan talk for the next 45 minutes.

    So I just say - yeah, I've heard that too. Or "no I totally agree that humans are the only species to consume another animal's milk." After a while it isn't any fun for them to tell someone something that they are just getting yessed to. Sometimes passion is annoying. But it can be diverted with feigning interest.
  • MyChocolateDiet
    MyChocolateDiet Posts: 22,281 Member
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    Wait what? Did you just start working at my husband's work? he's been driving me crazy with his paleo for months! so what I do that drives him CRAZY NUTS BONKERS is continue to drink my slim fast shakes on a steady basis. And then when I agree to eat his paleo food I put it on a tortilla or piece of sourdough bread right before shoving it in my mouth. Just when he thought he had me.

    So yeah unsure why the slim fasts drive him so nuts since i started dieting first and was doing that before him unsure why he expects me to stop but yeah. Drink GOGO juice or something really out there right in front of him while he says Paleo ish to you and just be like AAAAAAAAAhhhhhhhhhh, and gulp it loud and be like really obvious about it.
  • littlebudgie
    littlebudgie Posts: 279 Member
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    Noncommittal "mhmmm" answers to everything he says is probably the best way to go.

    However, if you really wanted to, you could develop a passion (real or feigned) for something else and switch the topic to it whenever he starts talking about paleo.
  • Joehenny
    Joehenny Posts: 1,222 Member
    Options
    Ricin comes from the castor bean.

    "One of the most dangerous poisons known, ricin, is a lectin derived from the seeds of the castor bean Ricinus communis (not a true bean and totally unrelated to the legume family Fabaceae); this is not, however, the same lectin found in beans and other legumes.

    Kidney beans and fava beans do not have ricin, they have a lectin (protein) called phytohemagglutinin (PHA), which is toxic but only if the beans are eaten raw or not boiled.

    Lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) can also be quite dangerous when consumed raw, but in this case the culprit is a different toxin altogether: linamarin, a cyanogenic glucoside."

    Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2385/#ixzz2SlmF0wMk

    Obviously he is not a "Breaking Bad" fan, otherwise he would know this key fact about ricin :wink:

    There was also a very lengthy study done in China, correlating high animal protein intake with increased rates of cancer.
    (Please note I did not state "causing")

    "The China Study (2005) is a book by T. Colin Campbell, Jacob Gould Schurman Professor Emeritus of Nutritional Biochemistry at Cornell University, and his son Thomas M. Campbell II, a physician. It examines the relationship between the consumption of animal products and a variety of chronic illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancers of the breast, prostate and bowel.[2] The book had sold 750,000 copies as of January 2013.[3] It is one of America's best-selling books about nutrition.[4]

    The China Study of the title is taken from the China-Cornell-Oxford Project, a 20-year study that began in 1983 and was conducted jointly by the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, Cornell University, and the University of Oxford.[5] T. Colin Campbell was one of the directors of the project, described by The New York Times in 1990 as "the Grand Prix of epidemiology".[6]

    The study examined mortality rates from 48 forms of cancer and other chronic diseases from 1973 to 75 in 65 counties in China, and correlated them with 1983–84 dietary surveys and bloodwork from 6,500 people, 100 from each county.

    It concluded that counties with a high consumption of animal-based foods in 1983–84 were more likely to have had higher death rates from "Western" diseases as of 1973–75, while the opposite was true for counties that ate more plant foods in 1983–84. The study was conducted in those counties because they had genetically similar populations that tended, over generations, to live in the same way in the same place, and eat diets specific to those regions.[7]

    The authors conclude that people who eat a plant-based/vegan diet—avoiding animal products such as beef, pork, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, and milk, and reducing their intake of processed foods and refined carbohydrates—will escape, reduce or reverse the development of chronic diseases. They also recommend adequate amounts of sunshine to maintain sufficient levels of vitamin D, and supplements of vitamin B12 in case of complete avoidance of animal products. They criticize low-carb diets, such as the Atkins diet, which include restrictions on the percentage of calories derived from complex carbohydrates.[8]"

    This information is also repeated in Joel Fuhrman's "Eat to Live" book.

    BREAKING BAD FANS!?!?!?!?!??

    Thought I was the only one obsessed with it ;)
  • Warchortle
    Warchortle Posts: 2,197 Member
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    Well, considering how long the entire human race has lived and survived on different foods you can tell him to go **** himself because without grain and sedentary life we would've been destined to be nomads for eternity. Grains gave us free time to develop technology, so all the 1st world things he enjoys today were made possible by carbs.
  • nikilis
    nikilis Posts: 2,305 Member
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    id just say "cool story bro, tell it again" after everything he says.

    works for me.
  • Joehenny
    Joehenny Posts: 1,222 Member
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    There are a plethora of rants on the paleo diet.

    Marc Lobliner on Keto (similar): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gruPs6hlYRA

    Layne Norton: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOUW2ruT8wA

    Or just tell him: Last time I checked, I'm not a caveman.
  • shade0343
    shade0343 Posts: 59 Member
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    Memorize brief passages from 'A brief history of Time' by Stephen Hawking. Spout them out whenever the co-worker starts in on their hobby horse. I also like move quotes.....

    If you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, baffle them with your bull****!!!
  • majasmi
    majasmi Posts: 133 Member
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    just stare in his direction and try look right through his head with the most blank look on your face and pretend there is food stuck in your teeth so your mouth keeps making weird movements and possibly sounds... i think that would get him to stop talking. or ask you what you are doing... 'me? entertaining myself'
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,747 Member
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    Easy. Just say "sounds good", then continue eating. Let him spout then say "sounds good". Eventually he'll get the hint. If he doesn't, then tell him you'll report him for "food harassment".:laugh:

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 28+ years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition
  • dakotawitch
    dakotawitch Posts: 190 Member
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    Ask if, since he's so into eating the way paleolithic human did, if he has any recipes for roadkill or insects. Maybe even something like, "So, I passed this dead possum on the side of the road this morning and couldn't resist. Since anthropological evidence says early humans were hunters rather than scavengers, I was thinking that you would have a cool paleo recipe I could try."
  • EricMurano
    EricMurano Posts: 825 Member
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    LOL just tell him you just ate an entire tub of 'gluten'.

    Or ask him whether cavemen really had the ability to cure bacon.

    I just tell him to get ****ed :)
  • MarisaDLS2
    MarisaDLS2 Posts: 108 Member
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    bump
  • katcunock
    katcunock Posts: 664 Member
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    Carbs.

    Lots of carbs.