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I've reached my goal weight, but it's hard to maintain

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  • smalls9686
    smalls9686 Posts: 189 Member
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    Hi,

    You're trying to maintain a BMI of 19.5, which could be a little too low for you. If you absolutely want to weigh this much no matter what then you're just going to have to be very vigilant about counting calories and keeping track of your weight. If you want things to be a little easier then perhaps reconsider whether it is worth trying to maintain that weight.

    Best and most sane thing said here. As both someone who has had issues myself with ED in the past (well it's like an addict really you are never really "cured" just managing well) and a licensed therapist I can say without hesitation if you cannot maintain your weight with good exercise habits 4-5 times a week 45-50 minutes of moderate activity with at least 2-3 days you have incorporated some strength training and a generally healthy diet in which you do not eat in excess nor deprive yourself of items you really want (i.e. a slice of cake, a few cookies, a piece of fried chicken in the same week) than you are more than likely trying to maintain a weight that isn't "normal/natural for your body.)

    When I work with clients, especially those whom are trying to find a healthy weight after being larger I normally abandon the "traditional" diet approach well before the average dieter. For example, when they are roughly within 20-30 pounds with in their goal weight I may have them get off that more restricted diet and begin adding more things back and lessening the exercise that may have been 1.5-2 hours a day. Dropping it down to 1 hour tops, this allows them to begin seeing what "real" life is going to be like...seeing what maintaining is going to be like...during this time their weight loss may be more 6-8 pounds a month but they are eating "real" food their isn't any restricting just moderation. They truly learn how to eat healthy....which is one thing a diet does not teach you.
  • pkw58
    pkw58 Posts: 2,038 Member
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    I am about 4 months into my second year of maintenance. What helps me the most is not just a weight goal, but an endurance/strength goal. Nothing fancy, just betterment of my current health. I maintain my calories at sedentary, as I have to estimate a lot when I eat out. I just keeping trying to up the activity, and it seems to be working. I don't let three pounds up or down bother me, I just measure my food and eat back to a basic weight loss day of calories/nutrition.

    Hope this helps...
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
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    I find it bizarre that MFP would tell you that your maintenance calories was just 1200 considering that's the absolute minimum net intake recommended by the site to reduce fat. At your stats, TDEE calculators will put you at 1500 when completely sedentary.

    I find that really weird as well. Are you sure you have it set to maintain?
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,371 Member
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    If you've lost weight eating nothing but 'healthy' foods, maintenance is going to suck, no way around it. You can't just start eating everything again or you'll probably gain, because I'm guessing you lost weight on a very low calorie diet, and your maintenance is probably lower now than it would have been if you had lost weight the healthy way.
  • ImtheOnethatsCool
    ImtheOnethatsCool Posts: 212 Member
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    Also, be realistic in that you'll have a maintenance range rather than staying at a single number being your goal weight.

    This is the absolute key to succeeding in maintenance. Especially with how your weight can vary day to day based on hydration, food in the stomach, and things like that, you'll need to accept you'll be going up and down. Personally, as long as I'm within 2.5 pounds above or below my target, I don't sweat it at all. And I don't make big adjustments to diet or exercise until my average weight is consistently beyond 5 pounds above or below. So I basically give myself a 10 pound range where, as long as I'm consistently in the middle, I don't worry about cutting things.

    That being the case, I find that exercise, combined with the "If It Fits Your Macros" approach keeps my weight in check and my soul happy. For a while, I even had the ability to have a chocolate bar every day. Some days I may eat more than my TDEE, but I also end up eating below it on others (rarely consciously for either scenario). As long as your average consumption is close to your average burn, you'll be okay.


    ETA: One other factor to keep in the back of your mind is where your goal came from. In my case, I'm above what the BMI chart says I should weigh. But, after sitting down with a doctor, measuring my bodyfat, and factoring in my frame size and the fact I need muscle (and its associated weight) in order to do my job, the conclusion was that I'm where I should be, even if the BMI chart disagrees. Because all those other aspects were included, my goal weight went up to a level that is easier for me to maintain.

    Joanne - for someone who has been here so long, why do you still not use the quote boxes properly?
  • zyxst
    zyxst Posts: 9,145 Member
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    Also, be realistic in that you'll have a maintenance range rather than staying at a single number being your goal weight.

    This is the absolute key to succeeding in maintenance. Especially with how your weight can vary day to day based on hydration, food in the stomach, and things like that, you'll need to accept you'll be going up and down. Personally, as long as I'm within 2.5 pounds above or below my target, I don't sweat it at all. And I don't make big adjustments to diet or exercise until my average weight is consistently beyond 5 pounds above or below. So I basically give myself a 10 pound range where, as long as I'm consistently in the middle, I don't worry about cutting things.

    That being the case, I find that exercise, combined with the "If It Fits Your Macros" approach keeps my weight in check and my soul happy. For a while, I even had the ability to have a chocolate bar every day. Some days I may eat more than my TDEE, but I also end up eating below it on others (rarely consciously for either scenario). As long as your average consumption is close to your average burn, you'll be okay.


    ETA: One other factor to keep in the back of your mind is where your goal came from. In my case, I'm above what the BMI chart says I should weigh. But, after sitting down with a doctor, measuring my bodyfat, and factoring in my frame size and the fact I need muscle (and its associated weight) in order to do my job, the conclusion was that I'm where I should be, even if the BMI chart disagrees. Because all those other aspects were included, my goal weight went up to a level that is easier for me to maintain.

    Joanne - for someone who has been here so long, why do you still not use the quote boxes properly?
    You read my mind, ImtheOne. Enjoy some Picard for your effort.
    tumblr_mvyo68tYgZ1sj3oxho1_250.gif
  • QuietBloom
    QuietBloom Posts: 5,413 Member
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    Sugar is proven to be addictive. It is the sugar you will need to keep under control. Keep it at 10 percent of your calories.

    That is how you lost the weight. Whether you know it or not, you reduced your sugar in your diet. Keep up that great work and you will maintain!!! 10 percent of your calories!!!!!!


    Joanne Moniz
    The Skinny on Obesity Group

    You give the most astoundingly BAD advice. :ohwell:
  • QuietBloom
    QuietBloom Posts: 5,413 Member
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    Also, be realistic in that you'll have a maintenance range rather than staying at a single number being your goal weight.

    This is the absolute key to succeeding in maintenance. Especially with how your weight can vary day to day based on hydration, food in the stomach, and things like that, you'll need to accept you'll be going up and down. Personally, as long as I'm within 2.5 pounds above or below my target, I don't sweat it at all. And I don't make big adjustments to diet or exercise until my average weight is consistently beyond 5 pounds above or below. So I basically give myself a 10 pound range where, as long as I'm consistently in the middle, I don't worry about cutting things.

    That being the case, I find that exercise, combined with the "If It Fits Your Macros" approach keeps my weight in check and my soul happy. For a while, I even had the ability to have a chocolate bar every day. Some days I may eat more than my TDEE, but I also end up eating below it on others (rarely consciously for either scenario). As long as your average consumption is close to your average burn, you'll be okay.


    ETA: One other factor to keep in the back of your mind is where your goal came from. In my case, I'm above what the BMI chart says I should weigh. But, after sitting down with a doctor, measuring my bodyfat, and factoring in my frame size and the fact I need muscle (and its associated weight) in order to do my job, the conclusion was that I'm where I should be, even if the BMI chart disagrees. Because all those other aspects were included, my goal weight went up to a level that is easier for me to maintain.

    Joanne - for someone who has been here so long, why do you still not use the quote boxes properly?

    This is also quite mysterious to me...
  • SueFromRI
    SueFromRI Posts: 206 Member
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    I feel so guilty and scared that I will star gaining weight again, but I also have cravings - I haven't eaten these stuff in MONTHS. And now with the holidays coming, there is so many stuff to eat and I find it so hard to not let myself go. How do you deal with that? Please, I need some advices...

    Let yourself have a treat once in awhile so you don't feel deprived, BUT plan for it. Candy bar craving? Get a mini size. Cake? mini cup cake. THEN

    I call it the 'Pay the Piper Plan'. Indulge in that 300 calorie treat BUT you must pay the piper either in calories burned or fat gained. So that day, pick EXTRA activities to burn that 300 calories. Or even 150 EXTRA calories each day for two days. The Piper is Flexible.
  • TheEffort
    TheEffort Posts: 1,028 Member
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    If you know what your actual maintenance calories are, then set a goal to eat x calories at the end of 7 days and incorporate exercise to keep energy balance in check towards that weekly goal. Also, be realistic in that you'll have a maintenance range rather than staying at a single number being your goal weight.

    This^^^
  • deb1207
    deb1207 Posts: 1 Member
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    I have been maintaining a 130 pound weight loss now for 2.5 years. I read the posts above, and lot of good information there. Truth I believe, is, that you don't know until you try, and watch and track: to see what combination of calories in, activities factored, work to maintain. I don't think maintenance sucks. I'm thrilled with the new body and all I can do: good biceps, a lot of energy, a good pulse, flexibility. No sweating, no huffing puffing. So my advice: try different calorie numbers, with different activities. For me, I track it and then I can see. I do exercise 2+ hours a day, though sometimes its just walking. Other days swimming lifting, elliptical, some combination. Its important too I think to figure out what foods satisfy you, not just physically but emotionally. If you eat stuff to maintain that you don't really like, won't work...

    One other note: A major study in June 2012 came out about maintaining weight loss. In it they basically compared results for people who had lost weight, and who for 3 different months, ate different diets but had same activity level. Percentage wise there was a High Carb Month: 60 carb, 20 fat, 20 protein . A Low Glycemic Month -40 carb, 40 fat, 20 protein. And A (VHFLC) Very High Fat Low Carb Month: 60 Fat, 30 protein, 10 carb month. This was the result:

    There was a range in how many calories a person could eat to maintain weight loss depending on type of diet. Example to show what I mean: Say a person could eat 1600 to maintain eating the "high carb" month. It was not the same when the diet switched. For the 40 40 20 low glycemic month, the person could eat 1726 to maintain. And for the very High Fat Low Carb month , the person could eat 1926. I am not advocating any particular diet, but just showing that even calories can vary based on type of food one eats.