Not Sure if this Goes Here: But Bone Tired All the Time...

Ok need some help here, over the last week or so it seems that no matter how much sleep I get, 7-8 hours a night, I am still bone tired, to the core, not sure what's doing or if there's something missing from my diet. I take a daily women's multi-vitamin, so I am not sure what the deal is...HELP!

Replies

  • sabinecbauer
    sabinecbauer Posts: 250 Member
    It could be an iron deficiency. Try upping your iron intake (my favorite: cream of wheat; one serving has 50% of your daily requirements) and if that's not sufficient you might consider an iron supplement--they're to be treated with great care, though, because most of them will make you constipated.

    In any case, you should see your doctor.
  • Pebble321
    Pebble321 Posts: 6,554 Member
    Are you eating enough calories?
    If you've cut down really low you may not be getting enough energy to keep you going - literally.
    I can't see your diary, so if this isn't the case, then it would be worth getting to your doc to be checked out.
  • psych101
    psych101 Posts: 1,843 Member
    Are you eating enough calories?
    If you've cut down really low you may not be getting enough energy to keep you going - literally.
    I can't see your diary, so if this isn't the case, then it would be worth getting to your doc to be checked out.

    QFT
  • neandermagnon
    neandermagnon Posts: 7,443 Member
    Are you eating enough calories?
    If you've cut down really low you may not be getting enough energy to keep you going - literally.
    I can't see your diary, so if this isn't the case, then it would be worth getting to your doc to be checked out.

    ^^^ this

    vitamins and minerals don't give you energy. Carbohydrate, protein and fats do.
  • arrseegee
    arrseegee Posts: 575 Member
    You sound hungry.
  • Pintado
    Pintado Posts: 33 Member
    This happened to me last year, and a blood test revealed three thing: low in vitamin D, anemic and low in B12. My doc recommended building more animal protein (I'm sort of a meat minimiser, but not exactly vego) into my diet to get more iron and B vits, but also taking some iron pills and B12 spray on top of this to help get my levels up. Vitamin D comes in a spray bottle too, and is pretty important in the winter months when you're not getting much sunlight.

    Also, goes without saying – check your BMR and TDEE, and make sure you're fueling your body with enough good, real food. Running around after two little kids would take it out of you for sure!
  • allergictodiets
    allergictodiets Posts: 233 Member
    1. what other posters said - check your iron, vitamin B and vitamin D levels.
    2. if they are normal, ask to have your TSH checked, it could be your thyroid underperforming
  • arrseegee
    arrseegee Posts: 575 Member
    You sound hungry.

    Further thoughts. If you have been taking a multi-vitamin regularly it is unlikely you are vitamin deficient, unless you have a very restrictive diet and the levels in the multi-vit are not high enough. If you are eating 1200 calories a day chances are that's lower than your Basal Metabolic Rate, and excessive fatigue is a classic sign of undereating. Get checked out by a doctor to be sure but the first thing I'd be looking at is whether you are restricting your calories too much.
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    I get that way when I don't eat enough or when I go too many days without resting.

    It's also a symptom of some medical conditions, but it's best to eliminate the obvious first.

    I'd check your calorie goal first, and if it keeps up go see your doctor. I get that a lot (I have chronic fatigue syndrome) and it can really make your life miserable.
  • SwampWitch666
    SwampWitch666 Posts: 110 Member
    Whenever I'm tired, being low in B12 or iron usually the culprit.
  • ealtynova
    ealtynova Posts: 3 Member
    All good points made below but I got the impression and correct me if I'm wrong, that you didn't really change anything too drastically in your health habits (eating, exercising or sleeping) so I thought I'd give you just another piece of information to think about, since the posts below pretty much covered what you should do if this is a result of some sort of deficiency. I don't know where you live but if weather has been fluctuating like it has here, that could actually play a role. I'm in philly and the winter here has been gruesome. About once or twice every week I can't get out of bed and could sleep for days if I could. I'm a medical student so it's been a big problem, and it's never been this bad until this year with all the weather fluctuations, it comes quite frequently around the same time that a lot of my friends who get migraines due to weather change get them, so i'm not making this up. Unfortunately, if this is the case there's not much you can do other than wait the winter out. But at least it should give you some peace of mind if nothing else seems to work. Hope this helps!
  • neandermagnon
    neandermagnon Posts: 7,443 Member
    ealtynova - that sounds a bit like a mild form of seasonal affective disorder. I think there are a lot of people who don't have SAD to the point of being able to clinically diagnose it but I think it's common for people to feel tired or low because of the weather, just like you describe, and lack of sunlight/daylight can make existing mental health problems worse as well.

    as you're a medical student, your medical school should understand this kind of thing seeing as SAD is a recognised medical condition and it's well known that people can be affected by a similar thing even if it's too mild for them to be diagnosed with SAD

    That said, if Aus in the OP's username stands for Australia then it's unlikely she's suffering from lack of sunlight/daylight as it's summer over there right now
  • AusAshMommy
    AusAshMommy Posts: 845 Member
    ealtynova - that sounds a bit like a mild form of seasonal affective disorder. I think there are a lot of people who don't have SAD to the point of being able to clinically diagnose it but I think it's common for people to feel tired or low because of the weather, just like you describe, and lack of sunlight/daylight can make existing mental health problems worse as well.

    as you're a medical student, your medical school should understand this kind of thing seeing as SAD is a recognised medical condition and it's well known that people can be affected by a similar thing even if it's too mild for them to be diagnosed with SAD

    That said, if Aus in the OP's username stands for Australia then it's unlikely she's suffering from lack of sunlight/daylight as it's summer over there right now

    The Aus = Austin, my son, Ash = Ashley, my daughter

    I live in Southeastern NC and yes the weather has been less than stellar and we don't have as many sunny days as normal, but that being said I agree that it might be a vitamin deficiency and maybe I am just not eating enough. Going to check in with my Dr today and see what she says.
  • Kenazwa
    Kenazwa Posts: 278
    Do not increase your consumption of iron-rich foods without checking with your doctor! Very important! There is a disorder that is caused by the body retaining TOO MUCH IRON. It can kill you. My son's ex-wife has it, and one of the symptoms is being so tired that she can barely drag herself out of bed.
  • Lesa_Sass
    Lesa_Sass Posts: 2,213 Member
    This happened to me a couple of times. First time I did not realize how bad I was until my dr put me on synthroid , a medicine for my thryroid. Second time is when I was eating 1200 a day or less. Someone on MFP challenged me to eat 1400 to see how I felt and BOOM, better all the way around
  • ILiftHeavyAcrylics
    ILiftHeavyAcrylics Posts: 27,732 Member
    Good points about the weather. I think I've had a little of that going on too.
  • delicious_cocktail
    delicious_cocktail Posts: 5,797 Member
    I'm happy to hear that you plan to speak with your doctor. The most we could do is ask that you open your diary so we can consider dietary issues, and rather laborious go through trial and error guessing. I'm certain that fifteen minutes with your doctor will be very helpful (or at least get you a prescription for Provigil. :smile:)