Is maintaining harder than weight loss?

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I'm just curious. Is it harder than trying to lose weight?
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  • MissBabyJane
    MissBabyJane Posts: 538 Member
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    For me, yeah
  • missylectro
    missylectro Posts: 448 Member
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    For me, yeah
    How come?
  • Ely82010
    Ely82010 Posts: 1,998 Member
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    For me, no.
  • boatsie77
    boatsie77 Posts: 480 Member
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    Each is challenging in its own way. Maintenance is simply a lifetime of NSVs; you need to shift your focus from losing weight to pursuing healthy and rewarding activities that give your life challenge & meaning. For me that's currently run-walking 5-10K races and training for a full marathon in Jan 2015.

    If you view maintenance only as a time when you'll finally be able to 'afford' eating a few oreos a night and hitting the Chinese buffet again once a month, you need to make sure you don't send all of your fat clothes to the Goodwill because you'll be needing them again before long.

    Start thinking NOW about what NSVs you'll be shooting for as you transition into maintenance so you don't get caught unaware.
  • rsclause
    rsclause Posts: 3,103 Member
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    I don't think it is hard at all. It is much the same as when I was losing but not as aggressive. Word of caution though, if you think abandoning what got you to the finish line is going to work, be prepared to start the race over again. Been maintaining for about three weeks now with good results, other than the ribs and chicken wing binge one night (three pounds worth).
  • Roz2889
    Roz2889 Posts: 71 Member
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    What does NSV stand for?
  • H0llyG0lightly
    H0llyG0lightly Posts: 214 Member
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    non-scale victory (e.g. clothes fitting better, running farther)
  • IcanIwill1
    IcanIwill1 Posts: 137 Member
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    I'm just curious. Is it harder than trying to lose weight?
    No its not.

    I still exercise which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.
    I still eat healthy which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.

    Occasionally, I indulge and its not like when I still trying to lose because I am not worried that I would not lose or that I would not get back on track again.

    Maintaining being harder than losing is a fallacy....it is no where as challenging as losing weight...not by a long shot.
  • thepetiterunner
    thepetiterunner Posts: 1,238 Member
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    I think psychologically it can be more challenging for some. It's easy when you're trying to set a goal and meet it and you're disciplined. I think when you move to maintenance mode, people sort of relax a bit and can find it difficult to stay on the straight and narrow.
  • hearthwood
    hearthwood Posts: 794 Member
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    No it's not harder to maintain than it is to lose. Your stomach and brain change to accommodate your new calorie intake, you're probably more used to exercising, and actually enjoy it now.

    If you go back to your old habits of not watching what you're consuming--YES you will head right back up.

    That's why I have eliminated the word "diet" from my vocabulary--because to me that word means something that is "temporary"--I use Life style change--meaning for the REST of ones life.

    I just do portion control--I don't eliminate certain foods while bulking up on others--I just eat less of it.
  • raindawg
    raindawg Posts: 348 Member
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    I wouldn't say harder for me, but a different mind set. After working toward a goal while losing weight I was a little lost at first on maintenance. After a little experimenting I found what worked best for me was to continue to have a goal mentality that kept me logging every day. I allowed myself a cheat day on Sundays. To "fund" that cheat day I ate at a 100 calorie deficit Monday through Saturday. That kept me logging everyday and shooting for something. Then Sundays were my reward.

    I'm on a bulk cycle now so that's a completely different mentality.
  • IHateThinkingOfAUsername
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    Technically it should be the same, but instead of the equation:
    calories in < calories out
    You have a new equation of :
    Calories in=calories out (give or take a few).
    Really there is the say wiggle room, one day you might be 200 up, the next 200 down etc.

    But psychologically is where the battle lies. To not think of the weight loss as a short/medium term thing, and that you can stop "dieting" and "go back to normal". To think of it as close to permanent as can be, and embrace it as a new life style. I think that's what makes it hard.

    (I'm on my second time losing my weight. I 'stopped' last time. I'm going to try to not stop this time, but change my calculation.)
  • BecomingShane
    BecomingShane Posts: 29 Member
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    I rather plan to use MFP for the rest of my life, including for maintenance, and if later on I want to lose a few more. I don't feel like weight-loss is a summer classes type deal. Once you decide to do it, it's a sort of rest-of-your-life decision, and that's why programs and apps like MFP are nice to have because they remind you of how far you've come. I've signed off almost all of my favorite foods in large amounts and outside of special/desperate occasions (these include: Cherry Coke, Flaming Hot Cheetos, Little Debbie Oatmeal Pies, Cheese sticks/cubes, Burger King's grilled chicken ranch wraps) for life, and I think it's just a sacrifice you need to be willing to make if you want to lose weight and be healthy to a degree that makes you happy.

    I can't see where maintenance should be more difficult. I'm by far no expert. But maybe if you thought that once you lost weight you could go back to eating anything you wanted and as much as you wanted, it will disappoint you to find out that you can't. But otherwise I find it extremely hard to believe it will be harder for me to stay under 1600 calories without exercise than to stay under 1200 calories without exercise.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,809 Member
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    Much easier and more enjoyable at maintenance.
    I ate exactly the same things when losing as I do when maintaining so now I get to eat more of the foods I enjoy and have more room for "treats".
    More relaxed about logging, weight fluctuations and fitting my diet into my social life.

    Weight was only one of my goals so maybe that makes a difference? It seems some people are a bit lost when they get to their goal and miss seeing progress as measured by their weight loss.
  • wilsoje74
    wilsoje74 Posts: 1,720 Member
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    I'm just curious. Is it harder than trying to lose weight?
    No its not.

    I still exercise which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.
    I still eat healthy which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.

    Occasionally, I indulge and its not like when I still trying to lose because I am not worried that I would not lose or that I would not get back on track again.

    Maintaining being harder than losing is a fallacy....it is no where as challenging as losing weight...not by a long shot.
    it is much harder for me. I think everyone's different
  • Prahasaurus
    Prahasaurus Posts: 1,381 Member
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    It was hard for me because I failed miserably.... :-( After having lost about 22kg (50 pounds), I assumed I had it all figured out. I knew my calorie portions by heart, I exercised regularly, I was on cruise control. So goodbye MFP. Then, after about 8 months or so, I managed to gain 7kg back. And get out of shape in a big way....

    Two major factors:

    1 - I underestimated the psychological effect of logging food. When I log, I really think about every calorie. I hate going over my daily count. It's a huge motivator to choose healthy foods, avoid too much alcohol, too many oreos.... I completely lost this psychological deterrent when I stopped logging. I assumed I would still follow calories in my head, so no worries. But I didn't.

    2 - I changed jobs (actually changed clients, as I have my own business). In any case, my regime changed immediately, and I wasn't prepared. Changing regimes can really have a detrimental impact on a fitness program. I still had time to exercise, but at different times than before, requiring a rethink on my part on what to do and when. For example, I had much more free time in the mornings, little time after lunch. Before I was doing a lot around lunchtime or in the evenings, and suddenly that was out.

    So now I'm back. I've started running again, I'm going to buy on-line skates later today to use after breakfast, I'm eating much better again, etc. I'm quite confident I'll lose the 7kg in 3 months or so.

    So I suppose the key takeaway from my experience is don't underestimate how challenging it is to maintain weight, keep logging, and if you have changes in your schedule, immediately craft a new exercise program to match it.

    --P
  • hearthwood
    hearthwood Posts: 794 Member
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    Much easier and more enjoyable at maintenance.
    I ate exactly the same things when losing as I do when maintaining so now I get to eat more of the foods I enjoy and have more room for "treats".
    More relaxed about logging, weight fluctuations and fitting my diet into my social life.

    Weight was only one of my goals so maybe that makes a difference? It seems some people are a bit lost when they get to their goal and miss seeing progress as measured by their weight loss.

    Me too, I plan on logging in every day. MFP makes it sooo easy to track calories. I have it on my cell phone, so no matter where I am at, I know exactly what I am eating. I also purchased a Jawbone UP that syncs with MFP that tracks the steps taken, and you can also add in workouts, hiking, walking, cardio, strength on it that gives a very accurate count of how many calories you're burning in a day. I plan to wear one of these the rest of my life also.

    Finally easy high tech solutions that goes where you go. And let's face it, knowledge is 1/2 the battle when it comes to losing weight, and getting fit, and staying fit.
  • TiberiusClaudis
    TiberiusClaudis Posts: 423 Member
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    I think psychologically it can be more challenging for some. It's easy when you're trying to set a goal and meet it and you're disciplined. I think when you move to maintenance mode, people sort of relax a bit and can find it difficult to stay on the straight and narrow.

    ^^^^This..at least for me.

    On thurs, I was 2 lbs under my goal weight I established about 2 weeks ago. Thought..ya..can enjoy the weekend. Had a dinner party and ate healthy...stuck with mostly proteins. Next morning...BOOM...4 lbs heavier. WTH? Back on the diet wagon...lost 1/2lb in the last two days. But pretty amazing what happens when I let loose of the reins for just one night. :sad:
  • Ely82010
    Ely82010 Posts: 1,998 Member
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    I'm just curious. Is it harder than trying to lose weight?
    No its not.

    I still exercise which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.
    I still eat healthy which I love and enjoy and do not intend to stop.

    Occasionally, I indulge and its not like when I still trying to lose because I am not worried that I would not lose or that I would not get back on track again.

    Maintaining being harder than losing is a fallacy....it is no where as challenging as losing weight...not by a long shot.

    Thank you for such a clear and complete answer.. I was in a hurry before and I just wrote "not for me." I feel the same way and I have been in maintenance for more than 3 years.

    I think that the key is to be vigilant and aware of our eating habits and to keep up with our exercises routine, what ever that may be.
  • sodakat
    sodakat Posts: 1,126 Member
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    I hope more people who have lost more than 10 pounds reply to this thread. Interesting that most replies are from members whose tickers show very low pounds-lost numbers... of course that could be just the amount the lost "this time" or with MFP.

    I wonder if taking a year or two to lose weight because you have so much to lose, puts you in a different place than if you lose 10 pounds (or less) in a few months?

    Another thought I had is that people who take control when they are overweight by just a few pounds compared to those who (like me) allow themselves to get morbidly obese before losing weight, are more nervous or shocked when they gain just a few pounds back, whereas someone who has lost 100 pounds might think "well I'm still 90 pounds lighter" if they gain back 10. Just rambling thoughts.

    I feel that learning portion control and tracking/logging what I eat is something I want to do pretty much forever, now that I understand how it enables me to feel healthier. I hope that maintenance will be more of the same without the deficit. Hope, hope, hope.