Am I not meant to be a runner?

Jbarbo01
Jbarbo01 Posts: 240 Member
I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?
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Replies

  • mommytoaiden
    mommytoaiden Posts: 75 Member
    Were you fitted for shoes or just bought some you thought would work?

    I had major issues with my legs when I first started to the point I was in tears. I rested my legs for 2 weeks, chatted with some of my friends that were runners and got my feet checked out at a running store. I haven't had any problems since!
  • Beautifulbridgittlee7
    Beautifulbridgittlee7 Posts: 352 Member
    You sound like my mum along time ago. She was into jazzercise, powerwalking, the stationery bike, etc, but wanted to be able to run a few miles too, but she always got bad shin splints, sometimes if your overweight it's too much, but when you loose running feels easier and helps give you great results.
  • RunnersLament
    RunnersLament Posts: 140 Member
    I've coached for the Running Room chain up here in Canada and can tell you that Most people can run... but don't worry its not you. Almost all runners experience some discomfort when they first start (no one ever said it was going to be easy!)

    I'd start by getting a proper gait analysis done by a properly trained physio therapist (one who specializes in Athletes). If done right, they can find what the problem is and work on fixing it via footwear, orthotics or technique. Many physio therapists use video to record your gait and assess any issues you may have.

    Where do your shoes come from and how long have you had them? Shoes break down and stop offering support after you've logged 300-500 miles depending on a variety of things (weather, your weight, your gait, running surfaces, quality etc).

    Once you've had a gait assessment I'd look at then visiting a specialty running store and seeing if you can find a suitable shoe based on the physio's assessment.

    Another thing I'd look at is how do you run? Do you take walk breaks? Do you run at a specific pace, or do you just run all out?

    Walk breaks are a great way to reduce injuries and increase endurance. Consider that running is about adaptation. No one wakes up one morning and decides to run a Marathon. It takes time to build up and adapt to the stresses of running.

    I'd also find and stick to a program... Couch to 5K is a very popular one which offers great results. There are others by Hal Higdon, Jeff Galloway etc that may be useful as well.

    Feel free to add me if you have any questions.

    Hope that helps!
  • patb987
    patb987 Posts: 44 Member
    Are you running on concrete?
  • emtjmac
    emtjmac Posts: 1,320 Member
    Consult a running coach, perhaps?
  • Veil5577
    Veil5577 Posts: 868 Member
    I also suffer from Achilles' tendinitis, I have had it for ten years and it has not gone away no matter what I try. PT, rest, creams, nothing has helped. I finally made my mind up that I have to suffer through this the rest of my life. I can't run and can't walk for long without pain, but I walk anyway.
  • BITEME_GRRR
    BITEME_GRRR Posts: 150 Member
    I don't really think I am meant for running either. Some people have the natural gait or whatever.

    BUT, I think non-runners can still run for fun and crank out a 3-5 miler.

    I run about that much every other day. I used to run half marathons and was plagued with hip bursitis, shin splints, etc etc.

    Here was my magic: start off slow and low distances work your way up SLOWLY. Stretch and USE THE FOAM ROLLER.
    I also go Super Feet at REI and replaced the insert in my tennis shoes. Made the world of a freakin' difference.

    happy runnin!
  • Jbarbo01
    Jbarbo01 Posts: 240 Member
    I read that and tried being barefoot more and got three types of tendonitis in my foot. Barefoot doesnt work for overweight runners.
  • afortunatedragon
    afortunatedragon Posts: 329 Member
    I hear you!!!
    Shin splints all over the place.
    Pain in my tibia muscle after 100m.
    No matter what I try. Changed running style, shoes, speed, stretching, etc.
    Pain is here.
    I had one f***ing single day without any pain.
    I want to run, I don't mind breathlessness, tiredness, sweat, doms etc, all normal part of the process.
    But pain? Pain that makes my knees sink to the ground.
    And whomever I asked about this and if they also experienced this - no, no pain, just started running

    I look at all the runners (they are everywhere) dying of envy and wonder why they and not me.

    Any ideas?
    somebody checking the style with video or any running specialist shops is not existent anywhere close where I live.
  • Meerataila
    Meerataila Posts: 1,885 Member
    I don't think I'm meant for running either. Or not steady jogging for miles and miles, anyway. But I can walk and then sprint up a storm before dropping back to a walk. So I do that.

    Do I wish I could float over the ground effortlessly for endless miles like a cyborg gazelle on steroids? Yeah. But no, my knees and spine tell me when to drop back to a walk. So I listen. I'm still a runner. Just not a distance runner.

    (And I still get my happy endorphin buzz.)
  • SanteMulberry
    SanteMulberry Posts: 3,202 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.
  • ThickMcRunFast
    ThickMcRunFast Posts: 22,511 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.

    You'll only get jumped on it because this opinion is demonstrably wrong. Evolutionarily, running is what human beings are designed to do. Not sprinting (we're not going to outrun any other animal over short distances), but for long, steady-state running. Sure, people do it wrong, they ramp up to fast, they don't wear the right gear, and they get injured. People also get injured squatting too much weight and dropping barbells on their throats. Not liking running is one thing, and that's cool, but it really is what we are designed to do.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/nature03052.html

    the abstract: "Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance running capabilities in humans and other mammals. Judged by several criteria, humans perform remarkably well at endurance running, thanks to a diverse array of features, many of which leave traces in the skeleton. The fossil evidence of these features suggests that endurance running is a derived capability of the genus Homo, originating about 2 million years ago, and may have been instrumental in the evolution of the human body form."

    Here's a summary if you can't get the scholarly article
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163757.htm
  • 1princesswarrior
    1princesswarrior Posts: 1,242 Member
    I feel your pain, I run with a bum knee that's prone to tendonitis and I've had two spinal surgeries. I use Voltarin gel on my knee and it helps immensely. You have to get it with a prescription in the U.S.

    I also am not fast by any means when it comes to running. I'm also interested to know if you are running on concrete? If so, maybe try a trail. I run much better on the trails around me than on the sidewalks and am in a lot less pain even with the hills.

    I also think you should have a gait analysis done as well as making sure you are healed enough to start running again. I sprained my ankle in January and couldn't run until April. Also, don't push yourself too hard, go slow, it has taken me 4 months to be able to run 1 mile comfortably and sometimes I still struggle with 2 miles. Last year at this time I was running 5K three times a week. Injuries take a long time to come back from so take your time. Also, maybe try the elliptical or biking as well, they are easier on the body. I was able to do both last year when my knee flared up for a couple of weeks.

    Here's a good post to read: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/topics/show/1217573-so-you-want-to-start-running
  • SanteMulberry
    SanteMulberry Posts: 3,202 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.

    You'll only get jumped on it because this opinion is demonstrably wrong. Evolutionarily, running is what human beings are designed to do. Not sprinting (we're not going to outrun any other animal over short distances), but for long, steady-state running. Sure, people do it wrong, they ramp up to fast, they don't wear the right gear, and they get injured. People also get injured squatting too much weight and dropping barbells on their throats. Not liking running is one thing, and that's cool, but it really is what we are designed to do.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/nature03052.html

    the abstract: "Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance running capabilities in humans and other mammals. Judged by several criteria, humans perform remarkably well at endurance running, thanks to a diverse array of features, many of which leave traces in the skeleton. The fossil evidence of these features suggests that endurance running is a derived capability of the genus Homo, originating about 2 million years ago, and may have been instrumental in the evolution of the human body form."

    Here's a summary if you can't get the scholarly article
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163757.htm

    Tell it to Pheidippides. :wink: I don't believe that mankind "evolved" from apes either so the article would be a "no sale". I think we are exactly as we were designed to be. Most of us are lousy runners and I expect that is why horsemanship developed. :laugh:
  • 1princesswarrior
    1princesswarrior Posts: 1,242 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.

    That's your opinion. I'm working on being able to run 8-10 miles and I'm not losing any muscle at all. I also date a long distance runner who looks 20 years younger than he is and has had no injuries and no joint problems at all. He also has no issue with lean body mass. The only injury I got while running was tripping over a toddler when I was running in a colors run last fall because the parents weren't paying attention.
  • ThickMcRunFast
    ThickMcRunFast Posts: 22,511 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.

    You'll only get jumped on it because this opinion is demonstrably wrong. Evolutionarily, running is what human beings are designed to do. Not sprinting (we're not going to outrun any other animal over short distances), but for long, steady-state running. Sure, people do it wrong, they ramp up to fast, they don't wear the right gear, and they get injured. People also get injured squatting too much weight and dropping barbells on their throats. Not liking running is one thing, and that's cool, but it really is what we are designed to do.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/nature03052.html

    the abstract: "Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance running capabilities in humans and other mammals. Judged by several criteria, humans perform remarkably well at endurance running, thanks to a diverse array of features, many of which leave traces in the skeleton. The fossil evidence of these features suggests that endurance running is a derived capability of the genus Homo, originating about 2 million years ago, and may have been instrumental in the evolution of the human body form."

    Here's a summary if you can't get the scholarly article
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163757.htm

    Tell it to Pheidippides. :wink: I don't believe that mankind "evolved" from apes either so the article would be a "no sale". I think we are exactly as we were designed to be. Most of us are lousy runners and I expect that is why horsemanship developed. :laugh:

    Well, the article didn't say we evolved from apes, so...not sure where you are getting that. It says our ancestors were ape-like, and then we diverged into separate lineages, which is what happened.

    But can't argue with someone who is just dead set on an opinion, no matter what reality says, so I guess this is good day?
  • 1princesswarrior
    1princesswarrior Posts: 1,242 Member


    Tell it to Pheidippides. :wink: I don't believe that mankind "evolved" from apes either so the article would be a "no sale". I think we are exactly as we were designed to be. Most of us are lousy runners and I expect that is why horsemanship developed. :laugh:

    Most people can't ride a horse for more than 15 minutes without being out of breath or complaining about saddle sores. It's not as easy as it looks. Try riding a 25 mile endurance ride, better yet, a 50 or 100 mile ride, let alone all the riders I see panting after riding a 4 minutes dressage test.:noway:
  • SanteMulberry
    SanteMulberry Posts: 3,202 Member
    I love to run, it makes me feel alive but I have been plagued by injuries from running for a long time. I've tried everything. I bought top of the line motion control shoes, highly rated inserts, went to PT, tried minimal shoes, have lost weight, and stretching and nothing seems to prevent injury.

    I just came back from 3 months of rest and PT for three types of tendonitis in my foot, which included my achilles, plantars fasciitis, and peronnial tendonitis. Now Im back and followed a jeff galloway Couch25K plan and now not only is some of tendonitis coming back but I can feel shin splints forming again too. I'm only running about 2 x 3 times a week for 1.5-2 miles max. I don't understand what I am doing wrong.

    Are some people not meant to be runners or has anyone else done something that helped them triumph over a similar situation?

    I'll probably get jumped on for this but: My personal opinion is that almost no one is meant to be a long-distance runner. It is extremely hard on the body but those who are addicted to it would run even if it killed them. I understand the exhilaration thing (I do pool exercise and nothing makes me happier than sprints in the water--amazing for the mood). In addition to being hard on the body, those who are very successful as long-distance runners look pretty awful. You end up consuming your muscle and most long-distance runners look very haggard in addition to having numerous musculo-skeletal problems. One of my MFP friends is a long-distance runner and she is plagued by injuries--is going for p.t. and has to get cortisone shots. Her physiotherapist told her to take up water exercise instead. I have had other running friends with the same problems. Not worth it.

    You'll only get jumped on it because this opinion is demonstrably wrong. Evolutionarily, running is what human beings are designed to do. Not sprinting (we're not going to outrun any other animal over short distances), but for long, steady-state running. Sure, people do it wrong, they ramp up to fast, they don't wear the right gear, and they get injured. People also get injured squatting too much weight and dropping barbells on their throats. Not liking running is one thing, and that's cool, but it really is what we are designed to do.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v432/n7015/full/nature03052.html

    the abstract: "Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance running capabilities in humans and other mammals. Judged by several criteria, humans perform remarkably well at endurance running, thanks to a diverse array of features, many of which leave traces in the skeleton. The fossil evidence of these features suggests that endurance running is a derived capability of the genus Homo, originating about 2 million years ago, and may have been instrumental in the evolution of the human body form."

    Here's a summary if you can't get the scholarly article
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041123163757.htm

    Tell it to Pheidippides. :wink: I don't believe that mankind "evolved" from apes either so the article would be a "no sale". I think we are exactly as we were designed to be. Most of us are lousy runners and I expect that is why horsemanship developed. :laugh:

    Well, the article didn't say we evolved from apes, so...not sure where you are getting that. It says our ancestors were ape-like, and then we diverged into separate lineages, which is what happened.

    But can't argue with someone who is just dead set on an opinion, no matter what reality says, so I guess this is good day?

    Didn't say that it did but the poster mentioned evolution as the basis of our ability to run. You may accept evolution as "reality" but I see it as the underpinning of a religion.
  • Mr_Knight
    Mr_Knight Posts: 9,532 Member
    Your symptoms are all consistent with running too far, too fast. Slow down, until it feels like you are going ridiculously slow.

    We evolved to be runners - everybody can do it when they're young, but the further you go into adulthood without maintaining the practice, the tougher it is to get the body back to where it once was.

    Good luck!

    ETA: Anybody who thinks riding a horse is "easy work" has clearly never done it. It's bloody hard work....