Your doctor is a lying liar pants!

Options
24

Replies

  • dakotababy
    dakotababy Posts: 2,406 Member
    Options
    I work in a hospital - I am around nurses and doctors often. The primary doctor in our unit had bypass....then gained all his weight back and then some.

    ...yeah. Canada's medical system is kind of silly.

    I probably should not generalize doctors, I guess the point being is that Doctors are hard to come by...and it is as if as long as an individual has slightly more knowledge than most then they can call themselves a Doctor. They work is many different units with many different kinds of patients. I dont even know if they are required to get specific up to date certificates for things like nutrition. They could be spewing out suggestions from the 1980's for all I know.

    Did you know - Some doctors still do not think being 100% alcohol free during pregnancy is necessary! Some doctors actually still say a glass of wine or whatever is fine while pregnant (in the city I live in)

    Always always always do your own research, challenge the doctor if there is contradictions and when in any doubt get a 2nd opinion. Doctors are way over rated and their suggestions are often taken as words of god.
  • Jus because they didn't sit through a lot of class time doesn't mean they know next to nothing about nutrition. Maybe they learned through their own reading or from life experiences. It's not rocket science. For every one story about a doctor who "knows nothing", maybe there are 5 more about doctors who helped people get their *kitten* together. You just don't read about that here because it's not attention grabbing enough for the forums.
    There are a lot generalizations in this thread.
  • I work in a hospital - I am around nurses and doctors often. The primary doctor in our unit had bypass....then gained all his weight back and then some.

    ...yeah. Canada's medical system is kind of silly.

    That is the king of generalizations.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    Options
    Yeah my Doctor is great when I walked into his office 5 years ago at 560 pounds he looked over my blood work and ultrasounds and ask if I wanted weight loss surgery. I told him No Way because if I could not fix what was broken in my head no amount of surgery would matter.. I was going to do this with diet and exercise or die trying... He said well the mental side of this you are going to have to look into on your own but "If you have a cold, I am your guy.... If you have a medical problem, I am your guy...... but I know just enough about dieting and nutrition to be dangerous so lets write you a couple scripts to go see the Endocrinologist (my blood work diagnosed me Type 2 diabetic) and a Dietician, He said I will work closely with them and together we will give you all the help that we can to get you through this...

    I have a lot of respect for my Doctor and he is always straight forward and brutally honest with me and that is what I like the most about him... No BS....... :drinker:

    Your doctor sounds a lot like my PCP. Honest, caring, and they know their limitations and are willing to refer you to someone who knows more than they do about an issue you are having.
  • independant2406
    independant2406 Posts: 447 Member
    Options
    Most PCP's are not savvy about weight loss or nutrition...but there are exceptions.

    My PCP doctor was actually 150lbs overweight and documented his several year journey to get fit. He got additional training in nutrition while he was losing weight because he wanted to know more so he could help himself and others. When I had my first visit I was shocked...no condescending lecture about being a fat slob or needing to get off the couch or telling me it was my fault I was fat. He jumped right in and said "Losing weight is difficult but I can help you. Lets get you checked out thoroughly for any underlying health conditions first. I know you can do this."

    Just as there are good and bad PCP's there are also good and bad dietitians. I went to a dietitian who reviewed my food diary and all she had to say was "Oh my god you eat better than I do" lol which wasn't helpful since I was having issues with hypoglycemia at the time and the whole point of the visit was to find ways to manage it better. :P

    If your doc isn't awesome at helping with the goals you want to achieve then seek out a different doc...there's a perfect fit out there somewhere!
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,371 Member
    Options
    This thread is worth a bump.

    My doctor hasn't weighed in on my diet at all, except to say that I need to eat low fat because of my cholesterol. It told me everything I needed to know...
  • Alidecker
    Alidecker Posts: 1,262 Member
    Options
    My doctor is great, she wanted me to lose weight, told me to exercise more and eat less. At my first appointment since starting weight loss(after years of her telling me to), I was down 25 pounds or so from the previous year, she asked to make sure I was trying to lose weight and not some other issue. Then we discussed what I was doing. She never told me to go on a specific diet or stay away from certain foods. She liked the way I was doing it when I told her I never really gave anything up. We started doing full blood work every 6 months to make sure nothing was going wrong and found that the weight lose screwed some things up and she has helped me get that all back in order while still losing weight. Well, she is trying, my vitamin D is still really low, but everything is good.
  • 212019156
    212019156 Posts: 341 Member
    Options
    They also don't know anything about exercise or athletics (unless possibly if they are an athlete themselves).
  • lunglady
    lunglady Posts: 526 Member
    Options
    I am a physician. I did my medical school research on nutrition. Not all doctors are the same.
  • Jim_Barteck
    Jim_Barteck Posts: 274 Member
    Options
    While it's true that most medical schools don't offer much in the way of training in nutrition, I would dispute the idea that all doctors know nothing. I am a doctor and do a fair amount of dietary counseling with my patients. And as for the remark about pharmacology, I took an entire semester (roughly 6 hours/wk for 14 weeks) of it, but recognize that new meds come out at an astounding pace, and it is hard to keep on top of all the new ones. Lots of my patients ask how they can lose weight, but I think much like quitting smoking, you have to be in the right state of mind to take on weight loss seriously. I thought I was "being healthy" because I was going to the gym 4x/wk, but I was giving myself tacit permission to eat ANYTHING I wanted and that cost me some significant weight that I'm now working hard to take off.

    With all due respect, claiming to know a great deal about pharamacology because you "took an entire semester" is like claiming to be an expert mathematician because you took Algebra last year. 84 total hours of training isn't going to make you an expert on *ANYTHING*.

    The problem with doctors (in general, not specifically you) is pretending to greater knowledge than they actually possess. This is one of the reasons for so many malpractice suits (aside from the abusive ones by bad actors): doctors have promised results they couldn't deliver based on inadequate training/knowledge in a field they were claiming expertise in and patients not realizing that their doctor doesn't know as much as he claims to know and therefore believing what he says without looking into it themselves.

    Case in point, I was recommended a treatment two years ago that would have resulted in sterility despite me explicitly telling my doctor that my wife and I were going to try for another child and despite there being other alternatives available. Had I not checked up on what that doctor was telling me, you can bet there would have been a lawsuit for that doctor's incompetence.

    Taking a course in nutrition or pharmacology isn't enough knowledge or practice to be an expert in it. Period.

    Part of life is acknowledging your own limitations and working within them. But doctors are wrongly believed to be the font of far more knowledge than their actual training provides.
  • VBnotbitter
    VBnotbitter Posts: 820 Member
    Options
    Well to be fair knowledge of nutrition is utterly irrelevant to the vast bulk of medical specialties. Most don't particularly give a rats *kitten* as to what their patients eat, because it actually doesn't matter.
  • monicastricker9
    Options
    remember they only have a license to practice medicine. I think we all have to be proactive in our own healthcare.
  • mercurysfire
    mercurysfire Posts: 144 Member
    Options
    you are right they aren't the same. :) you wouldn't go into the practice if you didn't care and want to help.

    docs are great people (for the most part, there's an a**hole in every group.) and i have my gripes with the referral system we seem to have developed where a doc won't even give stitches anymore. (when the hell did that happen???)

    but it's nice when a doc will admit they are out of their depth and tell you to go see an RD. especially if you have underlying issues. but still it would be kinda nice if nutrition were bigger part of doctor training since it seems like arrows keep pointing back at nutrition for being the root cause of a lot of conditions. but i guess it's pretty hard to keep up with the pace of research anymore anyway. no one has that much time...
  • HarrietSabre
    HarrietSabre Posts: 186 Member
    Options
    Yeah, but the benefit of seeing a doctor is that they can see the whole picture. Taking a 45 hour nutrition course may inform you about some stuff, but last time I saw the syllabus for one of those a few of those hours covered anatomy and physiology and gastric hormones and peptides, which wouldn't be in a nutrition course for a medic, it's in the first year. Any nutritional information is absorbed into the rest of the modules, and the benefit is that they understand your medications, general health, mental health and so on. A nutritionist making those decisions for you should be fired. If a medical doctor also specializes in digestive health, you can bet that they've put a lot more than 45 hours into understanding the way the body reacts to food.
  • laurie04427
    laurie04427 Posts: 421 Member
    Options
    I don't think a pcp can really cover all specialties including nutrition. They are good at screening you for things and if there is a problem, that's what the nutritionists/endocrinoligists etc are for.
  • VBnotbitter
    VBnotbitter Posts: 820 Member
    Options
    Yeah, but the benefit of seeing a doctor is that they can see the whole picture. Taking a 45 hour nutrition course may inform you about some stuff, but last time I saw the syllabus for one of those a few of those hours covered anatomy and physiology and gastric hormones and peptides, which wouldn't be in a nutrition course for a medic, it's in the first year. Any nutritional information is absorbed into the rest of the modules, and the benefit is that they understand your medications, general health, mental health and so on. A nutritionist making those decisions for you should be fired. If a medical doctor also specializes in digestive health, you can bet that they've put a lot more than 45 hours into understanding the way the body reacts to food.
    Yep yep yep
  • Mr_Bad_Example
    Mr_Bad_Example Posts: 2,403 Member
    Options
    Jus because they didn't sit through a lot of class time doesn't mean they know next to nothing about nutrition. Maybe they learned through their own reading or from life experiences. It's not rocket science. For every one story about a doctor who "knows nothing", maybe there are 5 more about doctors who helped people get their *kitten* together. You just don't read about that here because it's not attention grabbing enough for the forums.
    There are a lot generalizations in this thread.

    You have any stats to back up that generalization?
  • HarrietSabre
    HarrietSabre Posts: 186 Member
    Options
    While it's true that most medical schools don't offer much in the way of training in nutrition, I would dispute the idea that all doctors know nothing. I am a doctor and do a fair amount of dietary counseling with my patients. And as for the remark about pharmacology, I took an entire semester (roughly 6 hours/wk for 14 weeks) of it, but recognize that new meds come out at an astounding pace, and it is hard to keep on top of all the new ones. Lots of my patients ask how they can lose weight, but I think much like quitting smoking, you have to be in the right state of mind to take on weight loss seriously. I thought I was "being healthy" because I was going to the gym 4x/wk, but I was giving myself tacit permission to eat ANYTHING I wanted and that cost me some significant weight that I'm now working hard to take off.

    With all due respect, claiming to know a great deal about pharamacology because you "took an entire semester" is like claiming to be an expert mathematician because you took Algebra last year. 84 total hours of training isn't going to make you an expert on *ANYTHING*.

    The problem with doctors (in general, not specifically you) is pretending to greater knowledge than they actually possess. This is one of the reasons for so many malpractice suits (aside from the abusive ones by bad actors): doctors have promised results they couldn't deliver based on inadequate training/knowledge in a field they were claiming expertise in and patients not realizing that their doctor doesn't know as much as he claims to know and therefore believing what he says without looking into it themselves.

    Case in point, I was recommended a treatment two years ago that would have resulted in sterility despite me explicitly telling my doctor that my wife and I were going to try for another child and despite there being other alternatives available. Had I not checked up on what that doctor was telling me, you can bet there would have been a lawsuit for that doctor's incompetence.

    Taking a course in nutrition or pharmacology isn't enough knowledge or practice to be an expert in it. Period.

    Part of life is acknowledging your own limitations and working within them. But doctors are wrongly believed to be the font of far more knowledge than their actual training provides.

    I don't think this applies to doctors outside of North America, it's very, very, very rare that a European doctor would be subject to a malpractice suit. And I don't think it's "pretending to know more than they do", I think it's just no-one is perfect INCLUDING doctors...they do know this. Human error is a part of all careers and to be honest, the doctor knows more than the patient in most cases (not all!) One benefit in the UK is that the doctor can be more flexible with the drugs he prescribes rather than having to push the ones he's sponsored by or the ones that the patient can afford...I think some of the malpractice suits might be due to that rather than the doctor being an arsey git, tbh.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,576 Member
    Options
    It makes sense. You hopefully wouldn't go to a GI doctor for a neurological problem, so why go to a GP for nutrition advice? Most will only give the medical standards, which are easily found on the internet.

    If you want subject specific advice, ask someone trained in that subject.
  • rml_16
    rml_16 Posts: 16,414 Member
    Options
    I think most doctors have a very good sense about nutrition, but a dietician has the expertise.
    My doctor flat-out told me he knows nothing about nutrition.

    He referred me to an RD, but she looked over what I'm eating and had no suggestions, anyway.