Running Shoes?

2

Replies

  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited January 2015
    Have you had issues with that problem?

    Black toenail?

    A couple of times, but only when running more than 10-12 miles.

    Given that you're doing sprints, of a sort, on a treadmill there could be a number of factors. It's very unusual to suffer the problem at low volumes.

    It could be the toe box being a bit narrow, equally it could be too wide already. Your feet could be sliding in the shoe and your toes hitting the inside of the toe box repeatedly

  • cheshirecatastrophe
    cheshirecatastrophe Posts: 1,395 Member
    silkysly wrote: »
    Every runner has toenail issues. If you every do a half/whole marathon be prepared to loose a few.

    I run halfs and marathons. My toenails do just fine. For *me*, Brooks Ravenna FTW.

    I was originally fitted by a running store with the Asics GT-20xx series and wore them for years, but I always had a wicked break-in period of blisters with those. Trying out my first pairs of Brooks (Adrenalines, maybe?) was revolutionary. I thinks Brooks have a wider heel box. So, OP, if you aren't satisfied with what you get--even from the pros--don't hesitate to try something else. Brooks, Asics, Saucony, Mizuno, Nike, New Balance are all great brands for different people.
  • smilingdaisies
    smilingdaisies Posts: 76 Member
    Have you had issues with that problem?

    Black toenail?

    A couple of times, but only when running more than 10-12 miles.

    Given that you're doing sprints, of a sort, on a treadmill there could be a number of factors. It's very unusual to suffer the problem at low volumes.

    It could be the toe box being a bit narrow, equally it could be too wide already. Your feet could be sliding in the shoe and your toes hitting the inside of the toe box repeatedly

    After the research, I do think it lies within the toe box but also the fact I'm pushing myself and still need to lose about 50lbs. The treadmill workout I do is an hour long and it is intense intervals (it's a downloaded program with a coach). My 30-40 second sprints are at 8mph which I think is a lot for my size...I just didn't take into account that the shoe needs to support that. I know it's a 'duh' thing but it just didn't occur to me.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,731 Member
    Definitely spend the money on decent running shoes that are fitted for you before you knacker your knees completely!
  • smilingdaisies
    smilingdaisies Posts: 76 Member
    Definitely spend the money on decent running shoes that are fitted for you before you knacker your knees completely!

    LOL @ knacker...England? I know you are right. I thought I had good ones...but really never realized the depth of the fitting that needs to take place.
  • JScottBldrs
    JScottBldrs Posts: 44 Member

    quote="MeanderingMammal;30816752"]
    ....working vigorously on the treadmill, what shoes work best?

    The ones that are appropriate to your style of running, gait and build. Go into a good running shop and get some practical advice.


    This right here is all the info you need....... Get fitted for the right shoe.......
    I run in Brooks GTS14
  • Elise4270
    Elise4270 Posts: 8,375 Member
    edited January 2015
    ....working vigorously on the treadmill, what shoes work best?

    The ones that are appropriate to your style of running, gait and build. Go into a good running shop and get some practical advice.

    Random brand suggestions from people here will do you no good at all.

    Black toenail is more likely down to fit than anything else, particularly if you're trying running fast without actually building your base running capability.

    I second this. We have to make an hours drive one way to a good running store, but its worth it. I'd be mindful of the drop in a shoe. I changed mine a few years ago and was left with serious soleus pain.
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,577 Member
    You can do an online fit analysis if you aren't close to a running store. Look at the bottoms of your shoes to see where they wear the most. Also, while setting them on a flat surface and looking straight at the heels, do they lean in or out, is the rubber sole pressed down at all on either side? Some shoes are made to handle heavier runners and more mileage. Some are better for pronators of those who have high arches. These details are why it is important to be fitted properly.
    I wear Mizuno, you can try this link: myprecisionfit.com/test/welcome?lang=en_US&noAnswerSelected=&noMobile=http://
  • wagn27
    wagn27 Posts: 65
    Renee0887 wrote: »
    chuck636 wrote: »
    I like asics, not the most fashionable choice of mine,but good support and cushion

    LOVE my Asics! Most really good stores will check your gait and recommend the proper shoe for you. Well worth it!

    I've got Asics as well. Had the gait analysis done and it helped with my shin splints. I was told brands like Nike, Reebok, etc advertise as running shoes, but they aren't really the best.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    wagn27 wrote: »
    I was told brands like Nike, Reebok, etc advertise as running shoes, but they aren't really the best.

    In the same way that I wouldn't randomly recommend shoes, I'd also take something like that with a large pinch of salt.

    All manufacturers make a range of fits and configurations; motion control, neutral, cushioned, high drop, zero drop, minimalist... Some are more suitable for an individual than others.

    A Hoka is a competely different ride than a Vibram five fingers, but they could both do a similar job for different people.

    And Mo runs in Nike, so I suspect they're ok...
  • chunkytfg
    chunkytfg Posts: 339 Member
    A fan of Brookes GTS's here but will be being refitted soon just to check nothings changed.

    I size up though to get the right amount of room infant of the toes as my usual UK12's are a little small when running.

    As other have said get fitted properly and try everything suitable. Also ignore colour, style and price! How a running shoe looks is irrelevant it is there to perform a job. No point having a good looking shoe that ruins your knees/ankles. As for price I appreciate it is a concern for some but physio appointments are even more expensive ;)
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    Elise4270 wrote: »
    I'd be mindful of the drop in a shoe. I changed mine a few years ago and was left with serious soleus pain.

    Always worth a bit of effort to transition. My road shoes and winter trail shoes are 8mm drop, my trail racing shoes are 4mm. It takes a bit of easing into them over a couple of weeks to get used to them again.

  • bwogilvie
    bwogilvie Posts: 2,130 Member
    As others have said, brand recommendations aren't that useful in general. Every major brand makes a variety of shoes.

    Where it might be useful is if there are significant differences in the shape of the lasts that are used. My feet do well in shoes from a variety of brands; I currently am using the Brooks Ghost 6, Mizuno Wave Rider 17, Salomon Speedcross 3 (for snow), and Altra Olympus. The toebox on the Olympus is significantly wider than the others. So if someone asked about shoes and noted that they find that Brooks and Mizuno shoes pinch their toes, I would recommend taking a look at the Altra shoes (though they're zero drop, which would require some adaptation).

    One useful bit of advice that's often ignored: shop for shoes in the afternoon, ideally late afternoon. Your feet swell up as the day goes on, and buying shoes in the morning can lead to tight fits in the afternoon or at the end of a run. And bring a pair of running socks; you don't want to try on shoes with thin everyday socks and find they're too tight.

    By the way, some recent research (summarized by Owen Anderson in Running Science) suggests that there's much less benefit to matching a runner's biomechanics to shoe construction than people think. The most intriguing study found that novice runners who chose shoes based on how good they looked were less likely to get injured than novice runners who chose motion control, neutral, or stability shoes based on how much they pronated.
  • smilingdaisies
    smilingdaisies Posts: 76 Member
    You can do an online fit analysis if you aren't close to a running store. Look at the bottoms of your shoes to see where they wear the most. Also, while setting them on a flat surface and looking straight at the heels, do they lean in or out, is the rubber sole pressed down at all on either side? Some shoes are made to handle heavier runners and more mileage. Some are better for pronators of those who have high arches. These details are why it is important to be fitted properly.
    I wear Mizuno, you can try this link: myprecisionfit.com/test/welcome?lang=en_US&noAnswerSelected=&noMobile=http://
    Thank you for the link!
  • sm1zzle
    sm1zzle Posts: 920 Member
    what shoes work best?

    I like Brooks.

    I would suggest that you hit a runners shoe store and have them measure your foot and observe your gait.

    http://www.asics.co.uk/sports/running/preparation/how-we-run-the-gait-cycle-explained

  • Flab2fitfi
    Flab2fitfi Posts: 1,349 Member
    Again I suggest gait analysis.
  • La5Vega5Girl
    La5Vega5Girl Posts: 709 Member
    I like brooks and my new mizuno
  • AlisonH729
    AlisonH729 Posts: 560 Member
    edited January 2015
    Another way to see if you have pronation issues is to check the wear patterns on an existing pair of shoes. In most cases a good neutral shoe with the correct arch support & fit should be just fine.

    I've been running in Sauconys exclusively since high school. I'm on probably my 7th or 8th pair. But even shoes from the same brand built for the same gait/arch/etc don't fit the same. I had been running in their Cohesion series so long I probably could have bought them without trying them on. Until one day I DID buy them without trying them on and discovered they had changed the stitching around the toe box and the same size I had worn forever now felt too big. I have a pair of Peregrines now that some people say feel too narrow but are the most comfortable running shoes I have ever owned.

    Try them all on. Then try on some more.
  • jrline
    jrline Posts: 2,353 Member
    go to a running store they will have a treadmill and can help you get the right shoe for your gait
  • Roxiegirl2008
    Roxiegirl2008 Posts: 756 Member
    I am a Brooks GTS girl myself. I get my a 1/2 size bigger and have never had any issues with them. I have not had the "black toenail" thankfully but my pedi does look like crap. :D

    Like others have said hit the running store for gaint analysis.

    I would also suggest getting good socks. I love feetures. I have never gotten a blister when wearing those socks.

    Good luck!