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Overweight Personal Trainers - What's your thoughts?

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12346

Replies

  • bello584
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    Would you go to a bald hairdresser?
  • bos10fit
    bos10fit Posts: 80 Member
    edited January 2015
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    stuart160 wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    Not snob at all. A general statement.

    Yes, they could be actively doing these things, and I am NOT saying don't hire an overweight trainer. I am just making a general statement. The fitness industry is one heck of a hard place to be.

    I own a studio. You're constantly under scrutiny. You're constantly judged. It's the nature of the business.

    Obesity is an EPIDEMIC in this country. We are the fattest country in the world. 70% of people are overweight and/or obese and 33% of CHILDREN.

    What is up with the fat acceptance lately? The TV shows talking about how it's OKAY to be fat yada yada yada.

    I need to get off here and go focus on more educated tasks like writing up workouts for my 20 clients.

    Argh.

    No one is allowed to have an opinion these days without getting rammed down the throat.


    [/quote

    Gotta say that, judging from your free use of the word Fat and your judgmental attitude, it's just as well that you own your own studio because I'd never hire you in my Health and Wellness Center with an attitude like that. Then again, unless you have a 4 year degree in the Field and an ACSM HFS Cert, CHES, or are an RD you wouldn't be able to apply for a job with us.

    Tell me why I would want a job with you? So you can pocket half my money from a training session? That is why I own a studio. I keep my money for the full hour :) I don't need you to market for me. I can do that for myself. Hence why I have literally have made an 800% profit in one year.

    AND I live in a town without a successful health club. AKA Lynchburg, VA.
  • zoeysasha37
    zoeysasha37 Posts: 7,088 Member
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    I guess it really depends . At my gym all of the trainers are fit looking so I've never really thought much about this . I do know that one female trainer was very fit, but had gotten pregnant. During and after her pregnancy, she was heavier but I understood her situation so it didn't bother me at all. About a year after she had her baby, she looked amazing again . So in that type of situation, it didn't bother me at all . But I knew how she looked before, so maybe my opinion is biased.
  • irejuvenateme
    irejuvenateme Posts: 96 Member
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    I think chemistry weighs just as much as what routines they take you through, while in theory I can see your point, if they are helping you reach your goals that's what counts.
    Then again it also comes down to what you are comfortable with - if you can't see past this and you are paying good money then you may want to look elsewhere.

    However, I have had it happen the other way - I had a free session with a trainer who I found pretty condescending - he was in great shape and could probably have helped me but I would never have wanted to deal with his attitude - I would much rather have had an overweight trainer who helped me.

    One of the best personal trainers I had was a bodybuilder - he knew I was not but he worked with me and really no ego about the workout - just a nice guy who kicked my a** with a killer workout to push the level I was at, and he showed me a routine I could do on my own. Personal chemistry and compatible personality style both make a huge difference.


  • stuart160
    stuart160 Posts: 1,628 Member
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    bos10fit wrote: »
    stuart160 wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    Not snob at all. A general statement.

    Yes, they could be actively doing these things, and I am NOT saying don't hire an overweight trainer. I am just making a general statement. The fitness industry is one heck of a hard place to be.

    I own a studio. You're constantly under scrutiny. You're constantly judged. It's the nature of the business.

    Obesity is an EPIDEMIC in this country. We are the fattest country in the world. 70% of people are overweight and/or obese and 33% of CHILDREN.

    What is up with the fat acceptance lately? The TV shows talking about how it's OKAY to be fat yada yada yada.

    I need to get off here and go focus on more educated tasks like writing up workouts for my 20 clients.

    Argh.

    No one is allowed to have an opinion these days without getting rammed down the throat.


    [/quote

    Gotta say that, judging from your free use of the word Fat and your judgmental attitude, it's just as well that you own your own studio because I'd never hire you in my Health and Wellness Center with an attitude like that. Then again, unless you have a 4 year degree in the Field and an ACSM HFS Cert, CHES, or are an RD you wouldn't be able to apply for a job with us.

    Tell me why I would want a job with you? So you can pocket half my money from a training session? That is why I own a studio. I keep my money for the full hour :) I don't need you to market for me. I can do that for myself. Hence why I have literally have made an 800% profit in one year.

    AND I live in a town without a successful health club. AKA Lynchburg, VA.

    You speak like someone who really doesn't know what they are talking about so I think I'm just going to dismiss you as a troll. Enjoy your fantasy world.
  • bos10fit
    bos10fit Posts: 80 Member
    edited January 2015
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    I don't know what I am talking about? I invested x dollars. I walked with 8x time.

    Health clubs here, you keep half of the session. For example, if the hour or 30 minutes is $30 I the trainer get $15. The club keeps the other $15.

    I don't need an FM (fitness manager) to hand me clients. I do that on my own. Goodnight.
  • Natural
    Natural Posts: 461 Member
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    Codefox wrote: »
    Anyone can be a personal trainer. Just not mine.

    ditto
  • Texafornia23
    Texafornia23 Posts: 177 Member
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    Ther are lots of trainers... fat trainers, skinny trainers, trainers who climb on rocks..
  • Sutnak
    Sutnak Posts: 227 Member
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    If someone was 418lbs and barely had the mobility to shovel guacamole-covered-pizza slices in their mouth, yet they produced record-winning athletes... where do i sign?
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
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    bos10fit wrote: »
    I don't know what I am talking about? I invested 10g. I walked with 80g.

    Health clubs here, you keep half of the session. For example, if the hour or 30 minutes is $30 I the trainer get $15. The club keeps the other $15.

    I don't need an FM (fitness manager) to hand me clients. I do that on my own. Goodnight.

    Wow. Posting on the internet how much money you make... That's so professional… not. I'm sure your clients would love to hear you go around telling the world how much money you make.
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,950 Member
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    bos10fit wrote: »
    dbmata wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    You people are ridiculous. I like the attacks on my character saying I am judgmental. I know fat trainers. I know skinny trainers. I know trainers who do stupid *kitten* exercises that increase injury. I know trainers who demonstrate bad form.

    Or how about everyone judging the fit trainer as being an idiot meathead. See 18 posts above.

    I am just stating. If people didn't care about the way they looked, who people be on my fitnesspal?

    I would never make a client do something I can't do.

    I lead by example. Not only have I have completed a half marathon, a full marathon,
    successful weight loss of 50 lbs, I have an education too. Judge me.

    Would you hire a dentist with jacked up teeth?
    Would you hire a hair stylist with a jacked up haircut?
    For ----'s sake.

    This was flagged? People need to get over this silly thin skin thing.

    Bolded parts are why someone could be a good trainer. Experience, education.

    Yeah, I got flagged. It's my tone. ;)

    I am assuming since everyone would hire a fat trainer, they would hire a trainer who smokes too!!

    Why not, lots of folks go to restaurants where the cooking staff smokes.

    People in these parts are pretty weak when it comes to any tone other than "coddling".
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,950 Member
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    bos10fit wrote: »
    I don't know what I am talking about? I invested 10g. I walked with 80g.

    Health clubs here, you keep half of the session. For example, if the hour or 30 minutes is $30 I the trainer get $15. The club keeps the other $15.

    I don't need an FM (fitness manager) to hand me clients. I do that on my own. Goodnight.

    Wow. Posting on the internet how much money you make... That's so professional… not. I'm sure your clients would love to hear you go around telling the world how much money you make.

    Like you posting medical advice... ;) Stones and all.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
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    dbmata wrote: »
    bos10fit wrote: »
    I don't know what I am talking about? I invested 10g. I walked with 80g.

    Health clubs here, you keep half of the session. For example, if the hour or 30 minutes is $30 I the trainer get $15. The club keeps the other $15.

    I don't need an FM (fitness manager) to hand me clients. I do that on my own. Goodnight.

    Wow. Posting on the internet how much money you make... That's so professional… not. I'm sure your clients would love to hear you go around telling the world how much money you make.

    Like you posting medical advice... ;) Stones and all.

    Actually, not really.

    I never tell anyone here "OMG your blood sugar is 456, you are a diabetic!!! You must inject 1.5units/kg of insulin right now!!!" <---- That is medical advice.

    I simply tell them what doctors have told me, what I learned in nursing school, from patients, etc. Or if the individual has the same medical conditions that I do, I share my own experience. <---- That is called passing along information/personal experience. I also tell them to follow up with their doctor, as their doctor knows them best.

    Nice attempt though :)
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,525 Member
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    kaseyr1505 wrote: »
    No, I would not pay for a personal trainer who is noticeably obese. To me, a personal trainer's body is a part of their resume. If they were overweight/obese at one point, and are now fit, I wouldn't have any issues going to them.

    I wouldn't trust someone with frizzy, unkempt hair to do mine. I wouldn't trust someone to be my personal stylist if they didn't look put together, and I wouldn't trust a trainer who did not look fit. I guess this makes me judgemental, and I'm okay with that.

    which is funny because if there are two hair dressers in the town- and one has good hair- and one has *kitten* hair- who do you go to?







































    if you answered the one with good hair- you're wrong.















    You go to the one with bad hair.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,525 Member
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    I would never make a client do something I can't do.

    sucks when you have an injury that prevents you from doing a perfectly legit exercise... or because they are stronger than you.

    I understand the need to showcase youself- and be competent in what you do. But if a marathon runner comes to someone to improve their strength- who are they going to pick- the trainer who runs- or the trainer whose more over weight- and clearly knows about pure strength training?

    gotta pick your battles.
  • squirrelzzrule22
    squirrelzzrule22 Posts: 640 Member
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    Look at the coaches of college and professional athletes. They don't exactly look like the athletes they are coaching, even when they are of a comparable age.

    You don't have to be in perfect shape to know how to get someone into perfect shape. I think it is probably more important that you like the person. Personally, I think I might identify with a trainer who did not have a perfect physique because I would feel that they could relate to my experience a bit better than someone who is flawless.
  • lina011
    lina011 Posts: 427 Member
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    I think it all depends can they perform their job correctly...id also find if the person seems to be too fit looking ( lots of muscles etc. it can be a little confronting to a person starting out, oh gosh we aren't all so perfect , what's your definition of overweight... I'm overweight for my height!
  • Hornsby
    Hornsby Posts: 10,322 Member
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    Hornsby wrote: »
    So what's everyone's thoughts?

    You may be confusing "overweight" and "unfit". Years ago I'd been training at a sport for over a year and was better at it than most skinnier people--despite being overweight. I had gone from 89lbs over my goal weight when I began to 29lbs over by then. My muscles were well-trained and well-adapted for that sport. Occasionally, I had to deal with an organizer suggesting I try something easier. Once I was simply told I could not enter--they wouldn't believe I could handle it.

    Would weight have made me a poor teacher at the sport or exercises for it?

    Weight loss primarily happens in the kitchen. Most trainers are not registered dieticians.

    I'm not misunderstanding the difference. I am simply asking that for someone with no knowledge of what makes a good trainer, how can one expect for that noob to the gym pick an overweight trainer? Remember, I said borderline obese. I'm not talking a little pudge. Everyone is answering as if this community is looking for a trainer, but this community is enlightened as a whole in regards to what makes a good trainer. But for a new gym goer that is starting off, the trainers body becomes their advertisement.
  • astrose00
    astrose00 Posts: 754 Member
    edited January 2015
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    bos10fit wrote: »
    America is no longer the most obese country in the world. Mexico is.

    I believe it and know why. I watched Anthony Bourdain go to Mexico City and the food looked amazing. I watched the show while I did HIIT on my spinning bike. They were eating tacos (real ones!) and drinking some 100% alcohol (yikes!) and I was about to pass out from working out, lol.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,208 Member
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    Hornsby wrote: »
    I am simply asking that for someone with no knowledge of what makes a good trainer, how can one expect for that noob to the gym pick an overweight trainer?
    That sounds more like a statement than a question.

    Yes, newbies are drawn to shiny objects, and i agree it would make more marketing sense for trainers to appear somewhat fit. Do i think gyms should have a requirement to have a certain bodyfat level? No, because the biggest factor affecting trainer sales is rapport. Almost any trainer with good communication skills can have a booked schedule. So i think gyms should only have requirements for making sales goals.

    Any other questions?