Getting good advice.. why is it so difficult?

Why is it so difficult to get good sensible advice about dieting?

Everywhere I look for answers to my diet questions I seem to get completely opposite advice!

Eat more, eat less,
Eat fruit, don't eat fruit
low carb, high carb
Eat more protein, eat more fat
Do cardio, don't do cardio
Life weights, don't lift weights

Jeez, no wonder people go round in circles!!

I wish I could find a trainer that would deliver some personalised sound advice!! I'd happily pay for the privilege!

From what i've seen, even on here it seems that arguments arise over whats the best way to lose fat! I know everyone has their own opinion on the best way to lose, which is fine but trying to find unbiased information is actually rather tough!

So if anyone knows where to get good solid accurate advice, gonna direct me there!

Thanks.
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Replies

  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
    Because someone, a long time ago, found out that a lot of money could be made hocking diet programs, advice, books, meals, etc.

    Eat less, move more is the overriding best piece of advice.

    How you accomplish both of those is somewhat more dependent on you. Many people find counting, measuring, weighing and logging everything you eat the best way to accomplish "eat less". Some people find reducing carbs their best way to "eat less".

    Some people find walking the best way to "move more". Some people find lifting weights the best way to "move more".

    Regardless of the details, "eat less, move more" works every time.
  • jcim1ru
    jcim1ru Posts: 40 Member
    The Naturally Slim program changed my life in so many ways. I found it to be a total transformation program. It taught me to eat without special diets. It taught me how to understand why I was eating what I was eating. It gave me valuable tools to use for the rest of my life.

    10 weeks to a better lifestyle that I'm confident I can carry through to my grave.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    ^^yep^^
    It's as simple or as complicated as you want to make it :)
  • BWBTrish
    BWBTrish Posts: 2,817 Member
    Cazzy34 wrote: »
    Why is it so difficult to get good sensible advice about dieting?

    Everywhere I look for answers to my diet questions I seem to get completely opposite advice!

    Eat more, eat less,
    Eat fruit, don't eat fruit
    low carb, high carb
    Eat more protein, eat more fat
    Do cardio, don't do cardio
    Life weights, don't lift weights

    Jeez, no wonder people go round in circles!!

    I wish I could find a trainer that would deliver some personalised sound advice!! I'd happily pay for the privilege!

    From what i've seen, even on here it seems that arguments arise over whats the best way to lose fat! I know everyone has their own opinion on the best way to lose, which is fine but trying to find unbiased information is actually rather tough!

    So if anyone knows where to get good solid accurate advice, gonna direct me there!

    Thanks.

    Because people want to believe in magic Eat less move more is too hard for them.

  • superexcellently
    superexcellently Posts: 25 Member
    Great advice doesn't sell book/magazines (most of the time), because then their reader's would be thin/fit and wouldn't need their advice anymore.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,576 Member
    edited February 2015
    Because there is no single right way to do it. Because most of the methods work, but different methods are easier for different people. And a lot of people like to think what best/easiest for them is the best/easiest for everyone else.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Cazzy34 wrote: »
    Why is it so difficult to get good sensible advice about dieting?

    Everywhere I look for answers to my diet questions I seem to get completely opposite advice!

    Eat more, eat less,
    Eat fruit, don't eat fruit
    low carb, high carb
    Eat more protein, eat more fat
    Do cardio, don't do cardio
    Life weights, don't lift weights

    Jeez, no wonder people go round in circles!!

    I wish I could find a trainer that would deliver some personalised sound advice!! I'd happily pay for the privilege!

    From what i've seen, even on here it seems that arguments arise over whats the best way to lose fat! I know everyone has their own opinion on the best way to lose, which is fine but trying to find unbiased information is actually rather tough!

    So if anyone knows where to get good solid accurate advice, gonna direct me there!

    Thanks.

    Because people want to believe in magic Eat less move more is too hard for them.

    So true. I fell for the magic weight loss bullets and regimes/fads. Yes it will do your head in, especially as none of it works, at least not in the long term!!
    now I'm simply counting my calories and eating at a deficit and the weight has fallen off.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
    The problem is that there are too many opinions. You gotta find what works for you. The best way I found to assess the effectiveness of a bit of advice came from this six week course:

    Chronic Disease Self-Management Program - Licensed by Stanford

    This is how you run through a problem:
    1. Define the problem, like, want to lose two pounds over two weeks.
    2. Troubleshoot various solutions, and pick one or two. "What if I drop my daily calorie intake by 100 calories, and halt weekend binge sessions?"
    3. Follow your solution for a couple weeks and assess the results. Did they work? Keep doing them. Didn't work? Try something else.

    This might seem deceptively simple, but it quickly filters out the workable solutions. It also takes the emotion/angst/guilt out of weight loss.

    Another advantage is that medical professionals don't see us daily or weekly. They give their best advice on the day, but what if you find out a week in that their advice doesn't work? Patients with chronic conditions are empowered to change the advice to fit the changing circumstances.
  • Jruzer
    Jruzer Posts: 3,500 Member
    edited February 2015
    I think you're confusing strategy and tactics.

    The goal is to lose weight (fat).

    The strategy is to consume fewer calories than you burn. You need to eat less, or exercise more, or both, to get a calorie deficit and burn off the excess fat.

    The tactics are how you go about executing the strategy. Some people think it works better to eat a low carbohydrate diet. Some people (many people) think that lifting weights helps. Most people think that cardiovascular exercise is valuable.

    ----

    Start off easy. Log your food, do some exercise, and maintain a decent caloric defcit following MFP's guidelines. As you go you will learn more about what works for you, and you can improve your tactics.
  • azulvioleta6
    azulvioleta6 Posts: 4,196 Member
    Different things work for different people.

    That's why tracking is such a great tool--over time, you can start to see what really works for YOU.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Cazzy34 wrote: »
    Why is it so difficult to get good sensible advice about dieting?

    Everywhere I look for answers to my diet questions I seem to get completely opposite advice!

    Eat more, eat less,
    Eat fruit, don't eat fruit
    low carb, high carb
    Eat more protein, eat more fat
    Do cardio, don't do cardio
    Life weights, don't lift weights

    Jeez, no wonder people go round in circles!!

    I wish I could find a trainer that would deliver some personalised sound advice!! I'd happily pay for the privilege!

    From what i've seen, even on here it seems that arguments arise over whats the best way to lose fat! I know everyone has their own opinion on the best way to lose, which is fine but trying to find unbiased information is actually rather tough!

    So if anyone knows where to get good solid accurate advice, gonna direct me there!

    Thanks.

    Because people want to believe in magic Eat less move more is too hard for them.

    This.

    Really, the common sense advice is pretty consistent. It's the details--which come down to what will make it easier for you to reduce your calories and be more active (if possible), whether you count or not.
  • Lourdesong
    Lourdesong Posts: 1,492 Member
    You're just going to have to practice being discerning. In my experience, it doesn't take a long time to figure out who is full of baloney and who isn't, what works and what doesn't, what's feasible and what isn't.

  • 1stplace4health
    1stplace4health Posts: 519 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    The problem is that there are too many opinions. You gotta find what works for you. The best way I found to assess the effectiveness of a bit of advice came from this six week course:

    Chronic Disease Self-Management Program - Licensed by Stanford

    This is how you run through a problem:
    1. Define the problem, like, want to lose two pounds over two weeks.
    2. Troubleshoot various solutions, and pick one or two. "What if I drop my daily calorie intake by 100 calories, and halt weekend binge sessions?"
    3. Follow your solution for a couple weeks and assess the results. Did they work? Keep doing them. Didn't work? Try something else.

    This might seem deceptively simple, but it quickly filters out the workable solutions. It also takes the emotion/angst/guilt out of weight loss.

    Another advantage is that medical professionals don't see us daily or weekly. They give their best advice on the day, but what if you find out a week in that their advice doesn't work? Patients with chronic conditions are empowered to change the advice to fit the changing circumstances.

    That's amazing advice!
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,426 Member
    I agree it can be confusing and seem complicated. Weight loss boils down to the simple fact that if you eat less calories than you burn you will lose weight. That is all.
    You might find it easier if you have more or less of a certain food or you include exercise in your day. You don't have to do those things. It depends on your personal preferences and goals.
  • vickierivero1
    vickierivero1 Posts: 46 Member
    Everyones body is different. I say do what works for you without depriving yourself of nutrients that you need!
  • deksgrl
    deksgrl Posts: 7,237 Member
    The great thing is, you don't have to pay for it. You just need to educate yourself, and you can do that for free. But, most people don't want to take the time to do that. They just want to be fed the magic quickly.
  • sugargrammy45
    sugargrammy45 Posts: 252 Member
    Well, as you can see, there are as many answers as there are people. That does not mean that some of these answers are wrong, though. It really is a matter of finding what works best for you and then finding the discipline to follow through. For me it is the discipline. I'm on MyFitnessPal because without a daily diary or accountability I will not stay with any diet or any lifestyle change. I just won't. I need this type of program regardless of the type of diet I'm on. Quite obviously we all have to eat less to weigh less. I'm not able to exercise because of a serious health issue but I am able to measure and keep track of all that I eat. It's slow for me. But I AM losing weight. You can too. Just don't let this frustration get to you. Wishing you the best . . .
  • tomatoey
    tomatoey Posts: 5,459 Member
    edited February 2015
    Cazzy34 wrote: »
    Why is it so difficult to get good sensible advice about dieting?

    Everywhere I look for answers to my diet questions I seem to get completely opposite advice!

    Eat more, eat less,
    Eat fruit, don't eat fruit
    low carb, high carb
    Eat more protein, eat more fat
    Do cardio, don't do cardio
    Life weights, don't lift weights

    Jeez, no wonder people go round in circles!!

    I wish I could find a trainer that would deliver some personalised sound advice!! I'd happily pay for the privilege!

    From what i've seen, even on here it seems that arguments arise over whats the best way to lose fat! I know everyone has their own opinion on the best way to lose, which is fine but trying to find unbiased information is actually rather tough!

    So if anyone knows where to get good solid accurate advice, gonna direct me there!

    Thanks.

    1. Eat less than you burn - there's a consensus on this
    2. Split it down the middle and eat some fruit
    3. High carb if you're an endurance athlete or have IBS or you like it. LowER carb (not NO) carb tends to help people stay fuller longer on fewer calories, but it's not necessary if you don't like it
    4. This also tends to keep people fuller for longer
    5. No one says don't do cardio. Some say it's not necessary for weight loss, and it's not, strictly speaking. However, it's GREAT for cardiovascular health, and it's good for your brain, too (see another thread here today). It can also help some people cut their appetite, and can give you a buffer for calories.
    6. No one says don't lift weights - resistance activity is super important for MSK health

    Info from the American College of Sports Medicine on how to use exercise to stay healthy: http://www.acsm.org/access-public-information/position-stands

    For food - eat a variety of veg, fruit, meat, and grain foods (and some fat), dairy if you like it, measure them, and eat less of them than you burn:
    http://iifym.com/iifym-calculator/

    ****
    Sorry - here's the ACSM's advice (first link from the link above)

    The scientific evidence demonstrating the beneficial effects of exercise is indisputable, and the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks in most adults.

    A program of regular exercise that includes cardiorespiratory, resistance, flexibility, and neuromotor exercise training beyond activities of daily living to improve and maintain physical fitness and health is essential for most adults.

    The ACSM recommends that most adults engage in moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥30 min·d−1 on ≥5 d·wk−1 for a total of ≥150 min·wk−1, vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥20 min·d−1 on ≥3 d·wk−1 (≥75 min·wk−1), or a combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise to achieve a total energy expenditure of ≥500-1000 MET·min·wk−1.

    On 2-3 d·wk−1, adults should also perform resistance exercises for each of the major muscle groups, and neuromotor exercise involving balance, agility, and coordination.

    Crucial to maintaining joint range of movement, completing a series of flexibility exercises for each the major muscle-tendon groups (a total of 60 s per exercise) on ≥2 d·wk−1 is recommended.

    The exercise program should be modified according to an individual's habitual physical activity, physical function, health status, exercise responses, and stated goals.

    Adults who are unable or unwilling to meet the exercise targets outlined here still can benefit from engaging in amounts of exercise less than recommended.

    In addition to exercising regularly, there are health benefits in concurrently reducing total time engaged in sedentary pursuits and also by interspersing frequent, short bouts of standing and physical activity between periods of sedentary activity, even in physically active adults.
  • JPW1990
    JPW1990 Posts: 2,424 Member
    Everyones body is different. I say do what works for you without depriving yourself of nutrients that you need!

    This. Anything that speaks in generalizations is just that, a generalization. Only you know what factors you have to deal with - are you a binge eater, do you have food compulsions, have you always been less than 30 lbs overweight, are you over 100 lbs overweight, are you male or female, are you under 25 or over 40, what medical issues do you have, what medical issues does your family have, do you have moral or religious objections to certain foods, do you live somewhere certain things aren't readily available, what exercise options are available to you, how limited is your budget, it can go on and on.

    The advice for a 22 year old guy who has 15 lbs to lose, wants to lift, and has a huge disposable income by living with his parents is not the same as the advice for a peri-menopausal 45 year old woman concerned about her bone density and testing as pre-diabetic, with a family to provide for and a limited income. Eat less and move more are the same, but the details are a lot messier than that.