WEIGHT LOSS HELP ASAP

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  • cheltgirl87
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    How many calories are you eating a day
  • hollyrayburn
    hollyrayburn Posts: 905 Member
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    Are you SURE you're only eating that much? Do you use a good scale to weigh your food? Accuracy is key. I very rarely work out, and by eating at a deficit, I lose weight. So while exercise is a great way to get healthy, it is NOT what determines weight loss. And you have to do it more than a week. It didn't take us a week, or a month to put on our extra weight, right?

    Weight fluctuates from so many things: water, time of day we weigh, what we're wearing, using a different scale, and for women, of course, the time of the month. Don't be discouraged after a week or two. If you don't see a change, re-evaluate your food, and get back at it. Trial and error. ;)

    Good luck, and welcome to the journey!
  • krithsai
    krithsai Posts: 668 Member
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    I try doing sit ups and planks I find them hard to do

    In that case, find some challenge. There are all these challenges out there in which you start off slow and then work up to a goal. Say, you start by doing a 10 second plank and by 60 days, you're able to go up to 120 seconds. You can modify most plans to suit your fitness levels. I am myself doing a 30 day ab challenge but I'm doing it in 60 days because that's what suits my current fitness levels.

    This is an example - http://30dayfitnesschallenges.com/30-day-plank-challenge/
  • weightsnbakes
    weightsnbakes Posts: 34 Member
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    I try doing sit ups and planks I find them hard to do

    Of course they are going to be hard if you are just starting. Don't give up though! If you can hold plank for a couple of seconds it's better than nothing. Sit ups are overrated btw, plank all the way. Oh, and if you are trying to *just* lose weight off your belly you need to be more reasonable with yourself. You can't just lose weight off a single part of your body, fat doesn't work that way.
  • cheltgirl87
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    Yeah just by seeing the scales go down will be a start
  • Snip8241
    Snip8241 Posts: 767 Member
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    queenliz99 wrote: »

    You will learn a tremendous amount from these links. The first one is great. Read, learn and do. Good luck to you.
  • weightsnbakes
    weightsnbakes Posts: 34 Member
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    Yeah just by seeing the scales go down will be a start

    Exactly.

  • futuremanda
    futuremanda Posts: 816 Member
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    Don't listen to anyone telling you there is a One And Only True Way.

    Ex: "you HAVE to eat low carb" or "you MUST exercise 4 times a week"

    There's no one, and only, way. And what someone else "needs" is not what YOU need, only you can figure out what you need.

    Create your caloric deficit, stick to it. Use MFP to get your numbers. Exercise to help you do this, or don't. The deficit is what takes the weight off.

    I personally feel much healthier keeping my fitness separate -- I exercise to feel strong, empowered, to boost my mood, to get energy, to feel better in my own skin. When I tie it to what I'm eating, mainly, then it's like, you bust your butt forever doing things you don't even love, and you can eat, what, a banana or three? I just end up feeling bad.

    We are complex creatures with habits and feelings and thoughts and such. We make mistakes, we get impatient, we don't stick to something, we listen to the wrong people, we can't control aspects of our environment, etc. You have to find those things that are in your way and tackle them.

    Second the suggestion to read the stickies here. They do a fantastic job of explaining things simply. Other than that, I'd start with vowing to stick to things regardless of whether or not you see progress. Committing to it is the hardest and most important part!
  • farfromthetree
    farfromthetree Posts: 982 Member
    edited February 2015
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    Use this calculator to help determine your calorie goal.
    http://scoobysworkshop.com/accurate-calorie-calculator/

    This calculator takes into account your exercise so do not EAT BACK any exercise calories. Keep it simple to start. When I put your stats in for a fairly aggressive weight loss it said 1600/day.
    You WILL lose weight at this, assuming you are weighing and logging everything. Make that your goal...to learn how to weigh/log everything accurately. Exercise or dont...as you lose weight exercise becomes a million times easier.Focus on weight loss and if you want to exercise for your mental health, go ahead. But, one thing at a time. Forget cheat meals for now until you are in the swing of things. You cannot do this for a week and stop. Log every day. Eat a lot of protein to help keep you full, do not deprive yourself of your favorite foods...fit them into your 1600 calories.
  • KBurkhardt08
    KBurkhardt08 Posts: 141 Member
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    Hey! Definitely stick with it longer than a couple of weeks like everyone is saying. I'm no expert but I have been doing this for a couple of months now and its working. I usually eat between 1300-1400 calories a day. Mine is set at 1200 but I workout 5 days a week. Mainly running and other forms of cardio. Cardio burns fat and weights build muscle so its good to have a decent amount of both. I recommend the C25K app. Starts off easy and builds you up. Its hard sometimes but it got me seriously into running and I was the most anti-running person on the planet. Exercise is good for the extra calories but you're nutrition is the biggest part of weight loss. Make sure too keep under your calories and you will see results. Remember that it'll take twice as long to get rid of the weight then it did to put it on. Slow process but its worth it. :) Feel free to add me if you need any help with anything.
  • naturesfempower
    naturesfempower Posts: 107 Member
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    Try easier things. If you live/work/shop in a safe area, park at the back of a parking lot and get in some extra walking. Be sure to take stairs rather than an escalator or elevator. Walk around the block after dinner. Dance like no one is watching. Log everything that you eat as accurately as you can. Try to cut back processed and fast foods. Choose foods that are nutrient dense (full of vitamins, proteins, and fiber) and lower in sodium. Drink lots and lots of water. Stick with it and don't get frustrated with yourself. It works.
  • Briargrey
    Briargrey Posts: 498 Member
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    Okay, so first, you need to breathe. Second, you need to slow down. Third, you need to learn moderation!

    Small, steady, sustainable baby steps forward. Make tiny changes in your life and don't expect a miracle overnight.

    Somewhere on here is a great post about 'in place of a road map' or something - maybe someone will jump in with the link. It's got a lot of good info, but for a beginner who is panicking, it may seem to be overwhelming. My advice is to find it, bookmark it, and read and review it often.

    If you use MFP's goal setting instead of coming up with your own, that is fine, but bear in mind that if you're too aggressive, it will set you at 1200 calories or something hideous and unsustainable like that. I'd put your goal at no more than 1 pound per week loss and use that calorie total.

    Weigh everything or as close to everything as possible. But do not obsess and freak yourself out. Bear in mind that weighing is more accurate than measuring. And that we tend to underestimate our portion sizes. Use this as a tool to get the most out of MFP and your journey to health and fitness -- use it to learn accurate portions for all your foods, use it to learn how to estimate when you have to eat out and can't quite get accurate counts, etc.

    Log everything. Get used to it. Stick with it. Remember - you're looking long-term, not short-term.

    Remember that weight fluctuates frequently throughout the day and week and month. Use 3 measures --- the scale, pictures, and measurements. I recommend monthly measurements and pictures in the same outfit and pose to really help give you a snapshot across time. I personally weigh daily but only 'count' it weekly, just so I start having an idea of the fluctuations my body is doing. Whatever you do, don't get discouraged by those fluctuations. They are normal.

    Remember that with exercise can come extra water retention sometimes.

    You don't need to kill yourself with exercise, by the way. You should look into what you like and what works for you and build from there. Yes, strength training is excellent, and you can do it, but if it's hard now, it's something work up towards. I started at 5'1" tall, age 43, and 291 pounds. Two years later, I'm between 165-170 depending on the day and now I'm getting back into it to start losing more. I started with 20 minutes 3x/week treadmill only, 2.0 mph. I now do a lot more than that, including 3x/week strength training with free weights (squats, deadlifts, overhead press, bench press, rows, etc). But I built up to all that!

    The biggest way to fail -- do too much too quickly and expect massive changes too soon.

    Small, slow, steady, sustainable -- you can do this.
  • Snip8241
    Snip8241 Posts: 767 Member
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    Oh....buy a good food scale and measuring cups for liquids. You would be amazed the difference it can make.
  • jhoyett
    jhoyett Posts: 92 Member
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    Diet is most crucial for weight LOSS. Exercise is most crucial for weight MAINTENANCE. I would start with your diet. Use the calculators to figure out how many calories you can eat to lose 1 lb/week. I know that seems conservative; but get an idea and you can always decrease from there. Once you see what that feels like, then you can work on incorporating your workouts. If you're new to working out, start simple with a 30 minute walk 5 times/week. If you've been working out, stick with what you know. This is a marathon, not a sprint. You didn't put the weight on overnight and it's not going to come off overnight. Give yourself as much time to lose it as it took to gain it. Best of luck and feel free to friend me for extra accountability!
  • kss1231
    kss1231 Posts: 167 Member
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    I'm 5'0 and CW is 259. I have lost 14 lbs since January doing nothing but watching my calories and going to the gym 2-3 times a week if I'm lucky. My daily calories are set at 1700, but I usually come in around 1500/day. As everyone has said, weight loss is different for everybody and it will take time. Log your food, every nibble and taste, drink lots of water and exercise when you can. Start out with walking, best exercise around and just about everybody can do it. Don't weigh yourself everyday or you will drive yourself insane. Choose a day of the week that works best for you, mine is Sunday morning, and do it first thing in the morning after your bathroom ritual. This will ensure you get as accurate as possible with your weight. Also remember that TOM, sodium intake/water retention and exercise will alter the numbers on the scale. This is a life style change, not a diet. There is no forbidden food as long as it is within your daily calorie goal. Open your diary so we can see your food intake, maybe you have too much processed or fast food that is causing you to retain water which will halt any loss you are looking for. Again, these are not forbidden foods but foods that need to be eaten in moderation if you want to lose weight quicker. Hope this information helps.
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    Alyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,696 Member
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    Lots of good info in this thread, but just want to emphasize the sexypants link. Chock full of great information to get started.

    Stay consistent, and don't give up. Weight loss is not linear, and it doesn't need to happen fast. Calculate your TDEE and aim to lose about 1-1.5 pounds/week. Keep at it and don't give up. You need to eat in a way that you can sustain long term.
  • tulips_and_tea
    tulips_and_tea Posts: 5,712 Member
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    I try doing sit ups and planks I find them hard to do

    Which is exactly why you should do them! Don't worry about sit ups for now. Work on planks: get your form correct. Time yourself. If you can only hold it (perfectly) for 5 seconds, so be it. The next day do another 5. Then try for 7 or 10 seconds. Honestly, building little by little will not only help strengthen your core but it will give you the confidence to know that you CAN do this!

    I've been doing planks for years and I STILL do them regularly. They still challenge me. I start every weight workout with a 90 second plank. It gets my heart rate started.
  • georgiagreeneyes
    georgiagreeneyes Posts: 69 Member
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    Yeah just by seeing the scales go down will be a start

    First off CONGRATULATIONS on making the decision to start prioritizing your nutrition and fitness. You've already lost some weight and that's something to celebrate! Do you use other indicators to measure your progress as well (ie taking body measurements, noting your energy levels, or your physical fitness/tolerance for activities)? Try using some other non-scale indicators that will also clue you in on your progress... it's not uncommon for people to lose inches (aka fat loss) and to not actually have a change in weight.

    Also as for nutrition are you weighing things out? Do you rely solely on the pre-stored nutrition entries in MFP? I've found that some of the food item information isn't accurate and that was affecting my progress. It may not seem like much, but if several items you consume each day are off that could add up! It may be giving you a false sense that your consuming fewer calories than you really are.

    What kinds of activity do you currently enjoy? Are you standing much at work or throughout the day? I've started increasing the time on my feet as opposed to sitting and have noticed a significant uptick in my basal metabolic rate (you can burn up to an extra 50 calories per hour standing... so that certainly can add up over the day). If you need any support or have any questions feel free to add me! You're not alone here... and remember weight loss isn't a sprint, slow and steady wins the race!
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    I'm going to give a bit of advice from a fifty-something grandma. Advice is nice but this is your life. Stick with a plan for a few weeks and evaluate the results. What worked, what didn't, what do you want to change? Then change something and re-evaluate in a few weeks. A five pound gain I would not count as a failure. The body fluctuates up and down quite a bit, especially if you are adding exercise. But this is not fat gain. Do things that make you feel better and point you in the direction you want to go.

    I have lost over ninety pounds, I am under 200 pounds now, but I still don't do pushups, situps, and most planks. I have listed some easy core exercises for larger people today.

    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/blog/jgnatca/view/easy-on-the-knees-731797

    Now I am going to throw in a different exercise plan....do your aerobic exercise every other day with a full rest day in between. This gives your cardiovascular system and your muscles time to adapt to the new activity and you will notice your endurance and your strength improve faster.

    Walking is easy enough to do every day.