Help...exercises needed for a broken pelvis.

toots99
toots99 Posts: 3,794 Member
So in July of '14 I got into a car accident and broke my pelvis and some ribs. Surgery wasn't required, thank goodness. I was on crutches for about two months. Now, I can tell I'm not nearly as flexible where my pelvis broke (the pubic ramus, the very bottom bone near the groin). If I walk for too long (meaning, hours-which I have to do at work) it aches. Exercising makes it ache. If I were to sit cross legged, it feel like I'm extending that left side way too far.

I don't have insurance (I know, I know) so a doctor or physical therapist is out. I have a chriropractor friend who works on me sometimes, but it's not consistent that I can see her.

So if anyone can recommend specific exercises or stretches or advice, I'd sure appreciate it. Thank you!

Replies

  • toots99
    toots99 Posts: 3,794 Member
    I've been researching online but haven't found anything helpful yet. I'm thinking maybe spin or Pilates classes? I don't want to aggravate it though. Ugh.
  • AllanMisner
    AllanMisner Posts: 4,147 Member
    edited March 2015
    First, go see a doctor and check to see if you’re okay to begin a program. Given that you’ve expressed concerns about flexibility, I’d recommend yoga. Yoga is a good program for general fitness and the instructor (yogi) can work with you to get your mobility back (which may even benefit you when walking).

    Once you’re pain free, you can shift to other activities (weight lifting, spin, etc.).
  • toots99
    toots99 Posts: 3,794 Member
    Thanks for the advice. I've thought yoga can help too. As I said, I have no insurance and a doctor is not in my budget. Sucks, but it's true. I'll definitely look into the yoga. I tried bikram yoga (I'd done it before and loved it). The last time I tried it was WAY too soon and it was painful. My ribs hadn't healed yet by then.
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,952 Member
    ok, so this isn't relevant, but... with a broken pelvis, how do you like... live? It's kinda important to our movement, and well, daily movement.
  • usmcmp
    usmcmp Posts: 21,221 Member
    I broke my pelvis in 2005. It hurt to walk for a few years and even 5 years later doctors told me I would need a cane to walk within a few years.

    I suggest swimming. I know that massage or foam rolling helped a lot for the damaged tissues. To strengthen the hip flexors I did the hands to feet stability ball pass.
  • usmcmp
    usmcmp Posts: 21,221 Member
    dbmata wrote: »
    ok, so this isn't relevant, but... with a broken pelvis, how do you like... live? It's kinda important to our movement, and well, daily movement.

    @dbmata Very, very painfully. Unfortunately they can't really cast you, sitting hurts, standing is okay (just not for very long) and walking is excruciating. You do what you can.
  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,952 Member
    So not much different medical care wise from a broken rib, but a lot more excruciating... that's horrible. :(
  • mkakids
    mkakids Posts: 1,914 Member
    I fractured my pelvis 4 years ago during child birth.

    I currently run and lift as my main exercise. I started lifting about 2 years ago. The only lift I seem to have issues with is squats. I have been stuck at #165 for a long, long time. If I add anything, I'm in pain and can feel it the second I start the first descent.

    I have daily residual pain, but as long as I exercise regularly, it isnt debilitating. Exercise definitely seems to help.

    About a year after the fracture, I started on the elliptical. Then I progressed to a treadmill, and now alternate outdoors and the treadmill. I also regularly stretch and use a foam roller.

    I suggest starting slow. Walk, bike or swim, but do it slow and test your ROM as you go. Strech often, but again....start slow. Jumping right into a yoga class may not be the right thing to do. Don't be afraid to back off or stop for a few days.
  • mkakids
    mkakids Posts: 1,914 Member
    dbmata wrote: »
    ok, so this isn't relevant, but... with a broken pelvis, how do you like... live? It's kinda important to our movement, and well, daily movement.

    It sucks hairy monkey balls to live through.
  • tomatoey
    tomatoey Posts: 5,459 Member
    edited March 2015
    I can't even imagine! Your pelvis! Yikes!

    I pay $75 to see my physio when I go, and it was $120 for a consultation. Could you save up for something like that (if those rates make sense for your area)?

    I feel like this is something you don't want to get wrong...
  • tomatoey
    tomatoey Posts: 5,459 Member
    Even if you didn't go regularly, just once for an assessment and suggestions, and a follow up a month or so later...
  • tomatoey
    tomatoey Posts: 5,459 Member
    edited March 2015
    But I would have to imagine spin classes would be a no

    Ok, from physiopedia (??? - this feels so bad to post; you really should be evaluated by someone ! :( but if spinning class is the alternative...)

    http://www.physio-pedia.com/Pelvic_Fractures#Physical_Therapy_Management

    Physical Therapy Management

    Low-energy injuries are usually managed with conservative care. This included bed rest, pain control and physical therapy. [7]. Physical therapy include gait training, stabilization exercises and mobility training. [8]. Early mobilization is very important. The patient must get out of the bed as soon as possible. Prolonged immobilization can lead to a number of complications including respiratory and circulatory compromise.

    The intensity of the rehabilitation depends on whether the fracture was stable or unstable. The goals of the physical therapy program should be provide the patient with an optimal return of function by improving functional skills, self-care skills and safety awareness. [9] In people with surgical treatment (ex: ORIF), after 1 or 2 days of bed rest physical therapy is initiated to begin transfer and exercise training. The short-term goals are independence with transfers and wheelchair mobility. After leaving the hospital it is easier for the patient that the physical therapist comes at home for an exercise program. The time to achieve this goals are from 2 to 6 weeks, depending on de medical status of the patient. The home exercise program include basic ROM and strengthening exercises intended to prevent contracture and reduce atrophy. The patient performs isometric exercises of the gluteal muscle and quadriceps femoris muscle, ROM exercises and upper-extremity resistive exercises (eg. Shoulder and elbow flexion and extension) until fatigued. The number of repetitions varied with every patient. The patient is still in an non-weight-bearing status. [10]

    Once weight-bearing is resumed, physical therapy consisted of gait training and resistive exercises for the trunk and extremities, along with cardiovascular exercises (eg. Treadmill or bicycle training). Aquatherapy is also good and helpful when available. [10]

    all those involve judgement calls you're not in a position to make, though.

    Ok, even though they say bicycle training is ok, I'm pretty sure they don't mean this

  • dbmata
    dbmata Posts: 12,952 Member
    tomatoey wrote: »

    Someone should finish an ironman bike leg like that.
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,404 Member
    Try aqua fit. It will get you stretching and using your muscles without the impact of land based exercise, or the over repetition of swimming.

    I had serious lower left side injuries which compromised the flexibility of my left leg. Couldn't sit cross legged or squat from the age of 15 to 55. Started aquafit as my one and only exercise at 55 and now I can body squat *kitten* to grass. Something I was told I would never be able to do.

    Cheers, h.
  • toots99
    toots99 Posts: 3,794 Member
    Thanks so much for the helpful posts, everyone! It was pretty awful but I started getting better quicker than I thought I would. Being that it was summer, I loved being in the pool-it took all the pressure off of my pelvis and ribs and I was able to help build up strength. I'd hobble over on my crutches and go in almost every day, just doing all kinds of range of motion exercises. I think that helped a lot. It's not debilitating at all right now, more of just a frustrating pain in the butt. I guess time and light exercises are going to be the main helpers.