Needs good food for losing weight Breakfast/lunch/dinner

woodygotem
woodygotem Posts: 1 Member
edited April 2015 in Food and Nutrition
Hello, I DECIDED! not to give up on losing weight, im not trying to look good for the summer, I want to do it to be in a better shape! Weight Unknown, last time I was at that doctors, it was like 290 plus.. We did test to check and see if I had diabetes or something.. all good... and I want to keep it that way

And I need some foods that I can eat daily, I have no problem eating the same foods everyday
If you suggest switching it up, tell me why

What im eating currently daily, is McDonald's 3Pancakes w/1 Syrup & 1Butter for breakfast, then in the later eat a whole pizza! by myself DiGeno pizza, I believe... Im cutting the pizza out of the diet :wink: So I use to eat only Twice a day, And work at home, so I barely go outside

What I plan to do, is a lot of in house exercise and a have good food diet, leave suggestions in reply

Oh I can cook, if needed
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Replies

  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,830 Member
    Learn what is a healthy diet, compute how many calories you need to eat each day, and go from there. A good place to start is the "healthy eating plate" http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate. There are no specific foods you must eat for weight loss. You need to control how many calories you consume. To be healthy, however, you need to eat a well-balanced diet. Pizza and pancakes do not a well-balanced diet make.
  • peachyfuzzle
    peachyfuzzle Posts: 1,122 Member
    Eat less food. Go outside more.

    Boom.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I second the healthy eating plate. I'm all about balance. Before I lost all this weight I was diagnosed type 2 diabetic, and my food choices were all about balance. They still are all about balance. Since you don't need variety, don't worry about it. I love variety and it keeps me from being bored. Boredom is my biggest enemy.

    Here's an every day diet to try:

    Oatmeal sweetened with a tablespoon of agave nectar, milk of choice, and a boiled egg. (With whole milk, everything measured, I come up with a 424 calorie breakfast).

    Low fat turkey chili, multigrain bun, and 1 cubic inch cheddar (Mine comes out at 396 calories) You may add a tossed salad with low-fat dressing.

    Since you have cancelled pizza from your diet, perhaps a nice roast chicken (skinless) with potato salad and green beans. (332, depending on portion sizes)

    Snack on fruit, cut-up vegetables, or cheese and crackers.

    This will only work if you measure out standard portions. I've tried to pick foods that someone who is not so keen on cooking can easily pick up or make.

    Since you are more interested in getting in better shape than weight loss, start walking daily. That will really improve your cardiovascular health and vitality.

    If tracking weight is not your thing and you are doing this for health, might you track success with a step counter or something similar?
  • Jani22
    Jani22 Posts: 17
    290+ lbs is a serious amount of excess weight. I'm 200 lbs, so you're nearly a third heavier than me. The weight didn't go on overnight, so it won't come off overnight.

    Get a pedometer to see how much/how far you walk every day and aim for increasing this a little every day. Can you swim? Is there a pool near you that you could go to for an hour two or three times a week? Swimming is great for heavier people as the buoyancy means your weight doesn't impact painfully on your joints. I do over an hour four times a week.

    If you want to get in better shape you need to cut out the MacDs altogether. Nothing they sell is "healthy". Even the salads are drowned in high calorie dressings. Switch to something like porridge with fruit which will fill you up for longer. Give up the pizza for lunch and have something low fat/low calorie instead. Skinless chicken with salad and a slice of wholemeal bread (no butter) and fruit.

    Don't skip lunch altogether, especially if you're used to having a whole pizza. By the middle of the afternoon you'll be hungry, tired, cranky and more likely to cave in. A lot of people snack out of habit more than hunger, so keep veg sticks and fruit handy.

    Have a sensible dinner. Start with a veg soup which will help fill you up then a meal of white meat, fish, eggs, with red meat only once or twice a week with lots of fresh veg, steamed or baked and a small portion of carbs. More fruit if you want and one small treat, like a low calorie chocolate bar. Sugar free sweets (for diabetics) are good too, or sugar-free fruit jelly made up at home.
  • WindSparrow
    WindSparrow Posts: 224 Member
    I have a few suggestions for you. First, to rev up your metabolism, you need to eat smaller meals more often. Going too long between eating sort of tells your body you might be in a famine situation, which triggers a slow-down in metabolism. Instead of two meals a day, try breaking that up into 4-6 meals (which, ok, tend to end up more like substantial snacks). Not only does that increase metabolism in and of itself, but maybe you are like me; when I wait too long between meals, when I finally do eat, I feel extra hungry and end up eating more. When I eat more often, before getting seriously hungry, it is easier to make rational decisions about what kinds of foods my body needs for fuel and repairing itself.

    One reason for switching up what you eat is that the wider variety of foods we eat, the wider range of nutrients we get from those foods. For example oranges and strawberries are both lovely, healthy fruits and I would not care to say one is better nutrition than the other. But if you choose to eat only one and rarely eat the other, you miss out on some vitamins and minerals. Likewise, if you eat both strawberries and oranges, but never eat apples, you are missing out on some other things. Mind you, I tend to buy a container of strawberries, and eat from that for a few days. Then I get a bag of oranges, and eat those until they are gone. Then I get some apples... plums... nectarines... grapes. One fruit at a time, but switching it up over time.

    For breakfast, I suggest you start with something with a little more protein. Greek style yogurt can be very tasty, and has some protein to it, so that paired with a serving of fruit and an ounce of nuts can be very tasty as well as healthy. Or try a couple of eggs and a piece of whole grain toast. Peaches and cottage cheese or ricotta cheese with apple and cinnamon - (cut up a small apple, microwave on high for 1 minute, sprinkle on cinnamon and 1 packet artificial sweetener, then stir in 1/4 cup ricotta cheese).

    You will want to try to eat every 3-4 hours. Try to work in 3-5 (or more, more is good - my own goal is 5-8) servings of vegetables. The simplest meal you can make is a salad - try to avoid iceberg lettuce - romaine or any other variety or blend have so much more nutrition to them. So, salad, plus whatever other fresh veggies you like to add - tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers (red, yellow and orange as well as green - the flavors are different), radishes, carrots, celery, whatever you like. Then add some cooked, diced chicken breast, and measure your salad dressing (lite zesty Italian style dressings add lots of flavor so can be a good choice). So that's one more meal.

    For another meal, try making soup or stew - meat, poultry, or beans plus lots of veggies - that you can then eat from for several days. Either add some whole grain like barley or brown rice to the soup, or have whole grain crackers with it.

    Another meal could be a sandwich on "sandwich skinny" thin buns, whole grain/lite bread, or pita pockets. Or a string cheese, plus some raw veggies, and a serving of fruit.

    You like pizza - me too. I love pizza. I make pizza for myself on a Flatout thin crust, using lean ground beef, Hunt's Zesty and Spicy spaghetti sauce, and bunch of veggies on top. A measured portion of shredded Parmesan cheese gives a delicious flavor and not quite as much fat as some other cheese. So that could be another meal.

    Do watch the "extras" you add to things. Read labels to determine serving sizes and then take the time to measure. Salad dressings, croutons, bacon bits, cheese - they can all add something special to a salad or other dish, but if you over-do it, you just pile on the calories.
  • peachyfuzzle
    peachyfuzzle Posts: 1,122 Member
    I have a few suggestions for you. First, to rev up your metabolism, you need to eat smaller meals more often. Going too long between eating sort of tells your body you might be in a famine situation, which triggers a slow-down in metabolism.

    Hogwash, and horse apples.

    Do not read past the second sentence.
  • Jani22
    Jani22 Posts: 17
    The "starvation" mode that your body is supposed to go into if you don't eat enough every single day is a load of rubbish unless you're already seriously malnourished.

    If you are overweight, you need some fuel in order to exercise and lose weight and get/keep toned but if you're very overweight, like me, a few days of veg soups and fruit, a max intake of between 800-1000 calories plus daily workouts/swims, won't do you any harm at all.

    The "little and often" method is for people who are used to snacking between meals, in order to stop them from doing so or from fixating too much on when the next feed is due. The danger with this is eating more calories than you realise unless you're really, really strict about logging every single mouthful.
  • WindSparrow
    WindSparrow Posts: 224 Member
    Woodygotem, if you wish to go for a daily calorie count lower than MFP recommends based on your weight, activity level and weight loss goals, I wholeheartedly recommend you consult with a registered dietician or your doctor for guidance. The suggestions I have made are based on guidance I have gotten from physicians and registered dieticians. Since it is completely possible that my understanding is flawed (or, heck, stranger on the internet, could be making up crap, how would you know?) the wisest course of action is to consult with actual experts.
  • jlohcook
    jlohcook Posts: 228 Member
    Firstly - get a scale. You want to have a reminder how much you weigh and are you making progress.

    Secondly - take small step changes. You can eat mcdonalds pancakes, but can you cut off the butter? Or cut down to 2 pancakes? Or cut the syrup entirely or by half? Cut it slowly, you will get used to what you don't need. Or change your breakfast out entirely, if you are the adventurous type.

    Lunch - 1 whole pizza - how many calories is that? I'm always amazed people can eat 1 whole pizza. Anyway, again, if you like pizza, cut to half. Choose the thin crust type, do not drizzle with butter,, small changes. Honestly, 2 slices takes up 1/2 of your total calories count, probably. So, think of that will make you full if you do that, if not, change to some thing else.

    Thirdly, are you committed to this? If yes, it's not just hard work to exercise and asking people to provide answers, check around what your friends are eating or check out what's recommended by Jillian Michaels, or other gurus in the field, plenty of notes for you. Most important what's suitable for you. And what do you want out of this and your future.

    Finally, start exercising. Again start small. I started with 5 mins, working my way to 1 hr sometimes 1.5 hrs now. So, take small steps, gets your there and far.

    All the best.
  • Jani22
    Jani22 Posts: 17
    I think what everyone is trying to tell you is that the pancakes, syrup, butter and pizza have to go. Maybe not all at once, but certainly cut down and make some serious health changes to your diet.

    You work from home and hardly ever go out but manage to get to a MacDonalds. Use that time to go for a walk or shop for fresh fruit and veg. Just a block or so at first and build it up gradually. The fresh air as well as the exercise will make you feel better and give you a break from the house.

    I'm in the UK and many of you are across the pond, so a lot of your food choices will be very different from mine. I have no idea what Halos are, for example. When I food shop, I make sure I'm not hungry. I only buy fresh foods, nothing packaged with hidden added salt, sugar, oils, etc. If you do buy packaged foods check the ingredients listed. Look for lighter/lower fat options.

    I never buy bread, butter, cheese, biscuits (cookies), cakes, salty snacks or chocolate. Not because I have the virtue of a saint but because I know I will just eat the lot in one or two sittings. If it's not in the cupboard or fridge to start with, I can't be tempted to binge.

    And what do you drink? Cut out sugary sodas and alcohol and switch to diet sodas and/or water. Lots of water. Not because it will help "cleanse" you, which is nonsense - your liver and kidneys do that perfectly adequately - but because you need to keep hydrated and it will help you feel fuller.

    I wish you luck.
  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
    Jani22 wrote: »
    I think what everyone is trying to tell you is that the pancakes, syrup, butter and pizza have to go. Maybe not all at once, but certainly cut down and make some serious health changes to your diet.

    You work from home and hardly ever go out but manage to get to a MacDonalds. Use that time to go for a walk or shop for fresh fruit and veg. Just a block or so at first and build it up gradually. The fresh air as well as the exercise will make you feel better and give you a break from the house.

    I'm in the UK and many of you are across the pond, so a lot of your food choices will be very different from mine. I have no idea what Halos are, for example. When I food shop, I make sure I'm not hungry. I only buy fresh foods, nothing packaged with hidden added salt, sugar, oils, etc. If you do buy packaged foods check the ingredients listed. Look for lighter/lower fat options.

    I never buy bread, butter, cheese, biscuits (cookies), cakes, salty snacks or chocolate. Not because I have the virtue of a saint but because I know I will just eat the lot in one or two sittings. If it's not in the cupboard or fridge to start with, I can't be tempted to binge.

    And what do you drink? Cut out sugary sodas and alcohol and switch to diet sodas and/or water. Lots of water. Not because it will help "cleanse" you, which is nonsense - your liver and kidneys do that perfectly adequately - but because you need to keep hydrated and it will help you feel fuller.

    I wish you luck.

    I disagree about lighter/lower fat options for most things. No need to compromise on quality of food, just eat smaller amounts. A lot of 'diet' foods contain more sugar anyway.

    If you work from home there's no excuse not to cook, so not sure why you need to make a trip to McDonald's for breakfast.

    My diary is open so feel free to look for some ideas. I'm not perfect, but I have a pretty healthy diet.
  • Jani22
    Jani22 Posts: 17
    [quote="DawnieB1977;31991282"

    I disagree about lighter/lower fat options for most things. No need to compromise on quality of food, just eat smaller amounts. A lot of 'diet' foods contain more sugar anyway.

    If you work from home there's no excuse not to cook, so not sure why you need to make a trip to McDonald's for breakfast.
    [/quote]

    Not sure how this quote thing works yet, so hope I've got it right.

    The "eat less" works for those with some self restraint. I have terrible willpower so don't buy things like bread and cheese and butter, etc, nor processed foods/ready meals. I add loads of flavour to my meals with herbs, spices, chillies, garic, lemon and lime juice.

    I do agree with the "work from home, no excuse not to cook" though. I'm retired and have to keep busy to stop myself from sitting in front of the laptop or tv and snacking all day. I have a large garden that I'm re-landscaping. That burns a lot of calories.
  • DawnieB1977
    DawnieB1977 Posts: 4,248 Member
    I rarely buy ready meals, except sometimes when I'm pushed for time...mum of 3, teacher, shift working husband :). If I do I like the Sainsburys bistro or My Goodness ones, or if I'm feeling rich, an M&S fuller for longer one. Mostly I cook from scratch though, and my children eat the same meals we do. Well, my baby has them puréed.

    If I lived on my own I probably wouldn't buy butter or cheese, but my husband and kids like it. I can quite easily weigh out 30g of cheese and be done.

    However, low fat food often tastes like crap.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    What do you like to eat?

    You are eating too many calories as it is, so have you thought about why? Are you feeling hungry at certain times or feeling like you need that much to fill you up? There are ways to create more filling meals for many fewer calories, but that needs to start with you telling us what you feel like you need to be satisfied. For example, when are you hungry? How many meals do you want to eat? What foods do you crave? What vegetables and protein do you like? Do you want a sweeter breakfast (as you currently have)? Do you like eggs at all? Stuff like that.
  • jamie_reynolds
    jamie_reynolds Posts: 67 Member
    woodygotem wrote: »
    What im eating currently daily, is McDonald's 3Pancakes w/1 Syrup & 1Butter for breakfast, then in the later eat a whole pizza! by myself DiGeno pizza, I believe... Im cutting the pizza out of the diet :wink: So I use to eat only Twice a day, And work at home, so I barely go outside

    i'm not trying to be rude, but is this a joke? pancakes + pizza + inactivity = recipe for disaster. i would immediately start researching healthier recipes of the foods you like to eat and then learning to cook everything yourself. portion control is key. and get outside! walk every day. i think these changes alone will make a huge difference (If this post is even serious).
  • WindSparrow
    WindSparrow Posts: 224 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »

    Completely false.

    Your comments about my reply are enlightening in a very thorough fashion while your counter-suggestions for specific meals in answer to the original poster's actual question are likewise very practical. I shall be sure to try them and let you know my results.
  • WindSparrow
    WindSparrow Posts: 224 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »

    Can you show us the actual science that show that your metabolism revs up if you eat every couple of hours?
    Also, can you show us the science that shows that your metabolism slows down if you go a couple extra hours without food?
    How do people that practice IF not have their metabolism slow down and can lose weight?
    What do you think your body uses for energy throughout the day if it's not pulling from food being digested?

    Why on earth would I bother showing science for things which your evidence has so thoroughly proven false? Can it be that you expect me to have already eaten everything on your menu plan such that I should already have gotten results from it and therefore might contest your judgment? You will have to take my word for this but indeed, I have not. I can no more counter the superior arguments of you and your cohorts than I can counter the wisdom of network executives in deciding the fate of beloved television shows. I bow to your knowledge and magniloquence. Your work is the epitome of reasoned discourse. You do your parents and professors much credit. I am sure they are all very proud of you.
  • badgerbadger1
    badgerbadger1 Posts: 954 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »

    Can you show us the actual science that show that your metabolism revs up if you eat every couple of hours?
    Also, can you show us the science that shows that your metabolism slows down if you go a couple extra hours without food?
    How do people that practice IF not have their metabolism slow down and can lose weight?
    What do you think your body uses for energy throughout the day if it's not pulling from food being digested?

    Why on earth would I bother showing science for things which your evidence has so thoroughly proven false? Can it be that you expect me to have already eaten everything on your menu plan such that I should already have gotten results from it and therefore might contest your judgment? You will have to take my word for this but indeed, I have not. I can no more counter the superior arguments of you and your cohorts than I can counter the wisdom of network executives in deciding the fate of beloved television shows. I bow to your knowledge and magniloquence. Your work is the epitome of reasoned discourse. You do your parents and professors much credit. I am sure they are all very proud of you.

    Drama much?