What do you eat while hiking?

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  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
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    If I am going to be hiking for more than 2 hours, I bring along some kind of protein bar and single serve packages of string cheese. Maybe a clementine or two. If it is an all day hike, I will also throw in a sandwich with lots of meat but no mayo or anything, possibly mustard depending on the meat, and a couple of hard cooked eggs.
  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,086 Member
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    Protein cookies. Basically oats, protein powder, coconut flakes, coconut flour, craisins or raisins, eggs, sugar and butter. Always hit the spot and give a ton of energy. I also bring a large bag of salt free mixed nuts, and jerky (turkey or salmon). Some dehydrated no sugar added mangos are awesome too.
  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,086 Member
    edited April 2015
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    If you have a camp stove or fire try making soup with these ingredients. I bring these with me on longer backpacking trips:

    Dried refried beans

    Dried vegetables


    Also, some more advice. If you're actually backpacking, i.e. covering >10 miles a day in the mountains with a 20+ pound backpack, then don't worry about calories. If you're making good distance, and not stopping to eat every 20 minutes, you'll be in a deficit, and probably a large one. You should eat whatever and as much as you want to when you do stop, which is typically every 2-4 hours or so, to fuel the next 2-4 hour.
  • itsmeGennie
    itsmeGennie Posts: 39 Member
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    bring a bagel. I think it's filling and has carbs to fuel your hike. With nits/seeds/trailmix, psychologically it makes me feel like i haven't eaten anything substantial bc a handful of nuts is the same amount as a bagel - around 200cals
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
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    On a 5 hour hike I wouldn't eat anything at all, but I'd drink lots of water. I find it hard to hike after eating.
  • splashtree5
    splashtree5 Posts: 210 Member
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    Fruits, nuts, proteinbars and cereal bars
  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
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    watery fruit such as oranges, grapes, melon etc. can be a great way to stave off hunger and give you fluids. I usually take a combination of fruit, snack bars and nuts/dried fruit, along with water. You are unlikely to need much else unless you are stopping for a lunch break. I find fresh foods such as salads satiate me the most and help with any dehydration). If it's going to be cold you SHOULD take a flask of something hot!!!



  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
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    Anyone know about G.O.R.P.? No fair searching the net. All hikers should know about G.O.R.P.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
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    Anyone know about G.O.R.P.? No fair searching the net. All hikers should know about G.O.R.P.

    I cheated. But I don't see any reason I'd need to know that acronym.
  • HeySwoleSister
    HeySwoleSister Posts: 1,938 Member
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    Anyone know about G.O.R.P.? No fair searching the net. All hikers should know about G.O.R.P.

    I cheated. But I don't see any reason I'd need to know that acronym.

    LOL, GORP and Bug Juice were pretty much the staple diet of US summer camps for decades! I assume that peanuts in general now are not as standard due to the rise in allergies.