increasing calories

Ive been trying to research this as much as I can but have not found any answers, about 5 months ago I went through an upsetting time and ate less food, overall I lost 3 stone and because of this I have a huge fear of gaining weight as I like the new weight and size I am. Due to this fear I still try to eat less which leaves me hungry and I am only consuming around 600 calories a day which I know is unhealthy but the fear of weight gain prevents me eating more. I am just wondering if there is anyone else who has advice on how I can increase this to 1,200 calories a day and if I will gain body fat or weight in doing so. I am not worried if my weight increases for a short amount of time and is unnoticeable, it is just is I increase body fat where others will be able to tell. Any advice or people who have experienced this?
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Replies

  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,270 Member
    if you are not gaining weight now you are not eating 600 calories a day and if you aren't losing quickly you are eating more than 600 a day as well.


    I suggest logging accurately and consistently with a food scale/measuring cups what you are eating first to see where your calories sit...then work from there.
  • N200lz
    N200lz Posts: 134 Member
    Do some research on Lepton and the role it plays in your metabolism.
    When you starve yourself, your Lepton level drops and your metabolism hangs on to every calorie. An occasional spike in your caloric intake can get these levels back in sync and trains your metabolism to believe that food is plentiful and hanging on to calories is not required for survival.

    What I refer to as a spike is 800-1000 extra calories maybe every 7-10 days, but choose them wisely (i.e. vegetables, meat etc. not simple carbs.)
  • Kalikel
    Kalikel Posts: 9,626 Member
    You need to visit your doctor, who will tell you what you should eat and the effect it will have on your body. Get a referral to a dietitian and a therapist who specializes in eating disorders. When you have anxiety about food, that kind of therapist is the right one to see, even if you don't have an ED, they can help you.

    Go see the doctor before you end up very bad off. It's the smart thing to do. Do it.
  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,092 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Do some research on Lepton and the role it plays in your metabolism.
    When you starve yourself, your Lepton level drops and your metabolism hangs on to every calorie. An occasional spike in your caloric intake can get these levels back in sync and trains your metabolism to believe that food is plentiful and hanging on to calories is not required for survival.

    What I refer to as a spike is 800-1000 extra calories maybe every 7-10 days, but choose them wisely (i.e. vegetables, meat etc. not simple carbs.)

    There is no such starvation response. Your body doesn't need to "believe food is plentiful"

    Are you suggesting she continue to eat 600 calories?
  • initialsdeebee
    initialsdeebee Posts: 83 Member
    Doctor/therapist!!! Not random internet people.
  • N200lz
    N200lz Posts: 134 Member
    There is no such starvation response. Your body doesn't need to "believe food is plentiful"
    If you believe that then perhaps YOU should research the role Lepton plays.
    Are you suggesting she continue to eat 600 calories?
    Did I say that? I don't think so.
    The higher levels of Lepton are a direct result of higher levels of caloric intake.
    Elevated Lepton levels lead to a healthier caloric intake level on a daily basis without a resulting weight gain.

    Is that a clearer, more understandable definition?
  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,092 Member
    edited July 2015
    N200lz wrote: »
    There is no such starvation response. Your body doesn't need to "believe food is plentiful"
    If you believe that then perhaps YOU should research the role Lepton plays.
    Are you suggesting she continue to eat 600 calories?
    Did I say that? I don't think so.
    The higher levels of Lepton are a direct result of higher levels of caloric intake.
    Elevated Lepton levels lead to a healthier caloric intake level on a daily basis without a resulting weight gain.

    Is that a clearer, more understandable definition?

    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
    You need to tell this to your doctor and get his/her recommendation of help.

    You will starve and eventually kill yourself if you are truly only eating 600 calories.
  • N200lz
    N200lz Posts: 134 Member
    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
    My profession involves working with Nutritionist on a daily basis but I'll be sure and let them know they are all wrong.
    Thanks for pointing that out.

  • DeguelloTex
    DeguelloTex Posts: 6,658 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
    My profession involves working with Nutritionist on a daily basis but I'll be sure and let them know they are all wrong.
    Thanks for pointing that out.
    It's better they learn it late than never learn it.

  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,092 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
    My profession involves working with Nutritionist on a daily basis but I'll be sure and let them know they are all wrong.
    Thanks for pointing that out.

    Nutritionists aren't experts. It saddens me that you think that. It's best to find your information from scientific studies and not hearsay from some people that paid 20 to take an online exam on nutrition for their credentials.
  • Blueseraphchaos
    Blueseraphchaos Posts: 843 Member
    Nutritionists aren't doctors. Registered dieticians, on the other hand, at least here and in most places, have to have at the very least a bachelor's degree in this stuff...in other words, i put no faith in a nutritionist.
  • louh555
    louh555 Posts: 2 Member
    Thanks for the advice, it sounds stupid but I wasn't sure if you could go to the doctor for that sort of thing, I also just want to know if I will gain weight once I increase my calorie intake.
  • N200lz
    N200lz Posts: 134 Member
    Nutritionists aren't doctors. Registered dieticians, on the other hand, at least here and in most places, have to have at the very least a bachelor's degree in this stuff...in other words, i put no faith in a nutritionist.
    These Nutritionists do have Phd. level backgrounds but I'll let them know that all of the research and findings don't hold up to the scrutiny of such a scientific community as this.

    Sorry I interrupted, Doctor?

  • YellowApple666
    YellowApple666 Posts: 35 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
    My profession involves working with Nutritionist on a daily basis but I'll be sure and let them know they are all wrong.
    Thanks for pointing that out.

    Well, let them know the hormone is called Leptin. Lepton is a subatomic particle.
  • JustineMarie21
    JustineMarie21 Posts: 438 Member
    I was in your position a few years ago and honestly you just have to do it slowly! I did it on my own then later found out its called Reverse Dieting. Really beneficial! Start by adding 50 cals 5-10g carbs per week. Or if you still need help look up Ledbetter.com
  • galgenstrick
    galgenstrick Posts: 2,092 Member
    I was in your position a few years ago and honestly you just have to do it slowly! I did it on my own then later found out its called Reverse Dieting. Really beneficial! Start by adding 50 cals 5-10g carbs per week. Or if you still need help look up Ledbetter.com

    This. reverse diet, you won't get fat, or gain any fat by doing this. However you may benefit from eating a bit more to start.
  • msf74
    msf74 Posts: 3,498 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Do some research on Lepton and the role it plays in your metabolism.
    When you starve yourself, your Lepton level drops and your metabolism hangs on to every calorie. An occasional spike in your caloric intake can get these levels back in sync and trains your metabolism to believe that food is plentiful and hanging on to calories is not required for survival.

    What I refer to as a spike is 800-1000 extra calories maybe every 7-10 days, but choose them wisely (i.e. vegetables, meat etc. not simple carbs.)

    I think you mean leptin and the role of refeeding to help control hormone levels.

    Personally, I think the OP would be far better off slowly raising calories over time and getting some help (either with the help of a professional or through personal research) to deal with her fear of eating more rather than trying to introduce an approach which will have marginal benefits.
  • numinousnymph
    numinousnymph Posts: 249 Member
    N200lz wrote: »
    Perhaps you should look into the Minnesota starvation experiment and learn a bit more about the "starvation response" before quoting some junk about lepton you found out of some fad diet book.
    My profession involves working with Nutritionist on a daily basis but I'll be sure and let them know they are all wrong.
    Thanks for pointing that out.

    Well, let them know the hormone is called Leptin. Lepton is a subatomic particle.

    win :D
  • numinousnymph
    numinousnymph Posts: 249 Member
    edited July 2015
    And OP -- unless you are very short and very thin already, 1200 calories/day will not make you gain visible weight and won't make you gain visible fat. If you've been eating ~600 calories for at least a couple of weeks, your muscles may hold onto some water weight at first but it should only be a few lbs (water is HEAVY, remember that) and will go away probably within a week or so. 1200 calories will not make you gain weight (unless your BMR is less than that, but that's only if you fit the two conditions I mentioned at the start, or have a thyroid/metabolism issue) -- it may not even be enough to keep your body at maintenance (but it's certainly better than 600 cals/day), depending on your age/weight/height/gender. Try increasing slowly, like another poster said -- 50 cals/day, or even every few days if that's easier for you. And try to find support to help you through it. I've struggled with EDs and know the intense fear and anxiety that you are experiencing... you can message me or any other people if you need help or someone to talk to. Best of luck.