Please help

Hi all,

if your going to say (just stop) then don't bother reading any further. Thank you but I've tried.

Thank you if your still reading. My problem is that I for some reason am addicted to food, junk food. Healthy food. All food. I'm always hungry. Even when not I eat.

Is there anything I can do to stop myself? I know you will all say willpower but I am trying and still not getting anywhere.

Thanks in advance for your help. Gavin
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Replies

  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,479 Member
    Do you have other activities that don't involve food, or can you reduce your exposure to food ?
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    Walking is good, when you want to eat something that is going to put you over your calories go for a 15 minute walk as fast as you can. It really does help.

    Also try not to keep your trigger foods in the house until you are stronger around them. Munch on a huge bowl of salad leaves with a some low cal dressing on.
    Keep sugar free jelly in to have with a hand full of berries. You can do this! You just need to build up your determination too.
  • PaytraB
    PaytraB Posts: 2,360 Member
    Have you been to a doctor to see if there is a medical condition happening? (just to get that possibility taken care of)
    I find that if I'm around food and/or don't have something to keep my mind occupied, I will eat more. Instead of reaching for food when you're inactive, maybe go for a walk?
    I also found that I'm hungry a lot and am a volume eater, which means that I have to limit high-caloric foods if I'm going to stay within my calorie allotment. I try to add veggies to each meal: a salad, lettuce & tomato on sandwiches and on the side, lots of steamed veggies at dinner, snacking on carrots, for example. You can eat a lot if you keep it low cal. Perhaps that volume eating would help you?
    Make any changes slowly. Be aware of when and what you're eating and slowly make changes that help you bring the calories down. Eat slowly and chew a lot. If it helps, maybe chew gum between meals.

    You can do this. It takes time and you'll have to look for changes that will work for you but it can be done and you'll find the way.
  • juggernaut1974
    juggernaut1974 Posts: 6,212 Member
    Just stop. If you've tried in the past, try again. Continue trying until you achieve success.

    There is no other answer.

    (and no, you're not addicted to food...)
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I'm going to give you some reading to gain some insight.
    http://charlesduhigg.com/the-power-of-habit/

    Cognitive behavioral techniques might help. Imagining a Stop sign is one I learned in therapy group. The attached description is written for people with anxiety disorders, but it helps with obsessive thoughts about food too.
    http://www.aplace2talk.com/selfhelp_anxiety.html

    If you can stop yourself, even for a few minutes, get yourself a glass of water, you can give time for your higher level (reasoning) thinking to take over and steer yourself in a different direction.

    Put the snack foods up high and at the back of the shelf or don't have them in the house at all. Keep the foods in the fridge or in the pot and serve yourself on a small plate at the dinner table. Eat with chopsticks. Anything to slow you down and give you time to think things through.

    I found Haidt's work on the inarticulate side of our personality to be highly revealing, and came about the time I had my big turn-around. I wrote about it here. http://jgnatbuzz.blogspot.ca/2014/02/id-whisperer.html . I hope my article makes some sense. Basically, I made peace with my inarticulate side and I no longer fight it (willpower) but coax it along on the direction we want to go.
  • WBB55
    WBB55 Posts: 4,131 Member
    Maybe you're trying to create too large of a deficit.

    For two weeks try eating at maintenance. Set up MFP to "maintain weight" and log your food, eating at the calories it gives you. After two weeks change the goal to lose 0.5 lbs per week. And do that for a couple weeks. Just to get used to a tiny daily deficit.

    Then you'll be ready to take on more challenges :)
  • SueInAz
    SueInAz Posts: 6,585 Member
    I have heard of situations where there's no satiety trigger for some people; they literally aren't getting a signal from their body that they've had enough food. I'm not sure if that's your problem but it's worth getting professional help to deal with the problem if you have access to it.
  • leahkite
    leahkite Posts: 47 Member
    Are you sleeping enough? Drinking enough water? Is this something you have spoken to your physician about? Do you keep a food diary, not just a what you eat and when; but something that you track what your emotional feelings are when you are eating? For me I know if I'm stressed out or anxious I will reach for food even if I'm not hungry. Learning triggers has helped me find new ways of coping.
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    WBB55 wrote: »
    Maybe you're trying to create too large of a deficit.

    For two weeks try eating at maintenance. Set up MFP to "maintain weight" and log your food, eating at the calories it gives you. After two weeks change the goal to lose 0.5 lbs per week. And do that for a couple weeks. Just to get used to a tiny daily deficit.

    Then you'll be ready to take on more challenges :)

    That is a very good idea!

    OP then you shouldn't feel too hungry at all as it will allow you a lot of food. Have you put your details in to the diary yet?
  • I'm not sure what you've already tried but here are some thoughts:
    - keep your "trigger foods" out of your house
    - when you feel like eating, get up and move around instead. Go for a walk
    - limit TV and screen time to cut down on mindless snacking
    - meal plan and plan ahead. Make sure you aren't putting yourself in a position where you are really hungry and will eat anything in sight
  • fieryaries
    fieryaries Posts: 3 Member
    I hear ya!! I don't think it's hunger all the time. There are underlying "issues" if you will, that cause us to run to food for comfort. Even if I stock up the fridge with healty food, I catch myself heading out for the more "satisfying" junky stuff. I'm trying to find things to do OTHER than eat when bored, sad, anxious. I find that when I exercise, I have to have something healthy to not undo the work I did. IDK. Hope this helps...Unless there is an underlying medical condition that causes you to feel hunger all the time, it's definitely something within that you need to identify and take it from there.
  • Merrysix
    Merrysix Posts: 336 Member
    Here is what works for me: I eat 5 smaller meals a day so I am never too hungry; I eat plenty of fat and protein as this seems to fill me up more and keep me full longer, along with my fruit and vegies; I eat so I lose weight at a very slow pace so I don't get too hungry; I always find the first thirty days the hardest and then it gets easier; I also find it easier when I exercise as I feel better. To find what works for you is the trick -- but it is possible to do it.
  • avilancaster871
    avilancaster871 Posts: 147 Member
    gav1901 wrote: »
    Hi all,

    if your going to say (just stop) then don't bother reading any further. Thank you but I've tried.

    Thank you if your still reading. My problem is that I for some reason am addicted to food, junk food. Healthy food. All food. I'm always hungry. Even when not I eat.

    Is there anything I can do to stop myself? I know you will all say willpower but I am trying and still not getting anywhere.

    Thanks in advance for your help. Gavin

    I found myself eating all the time even when I wasn't hungry! Drink a pint of water when u feel hungry as that keeps it at bay for a bit lol also keep urself busy... I find when im busy I don't think about being hungry it's when I'm sat down not doing a lot I reach for the food :) maybe find a hobby or something? Keep eating ur meals u could even do 5 meals a day instead of 3 just do smaller portions of that makes sence? Feel free to add me if u want to talk at all :) x
  • vaguelyvegan
    vaguelyvegan Posts: 45 Member
    Maybe you're trying to do too much too soon. Try making small, easy changes at first. Replace one soda per day, for instance, with water. Do that for a week until you master it. After that you might try to replace one snack per day with a healthy, portion-controlled alternative, and do that for a while until it too comes naturally. Remember that you don't have to do it all at once. Baby steps, you know? Make each little goal an easy one, something you are absolutely sure you can master, before you move on to the next.
  • katiegud
    katiegud Posts: 25 Member
    It sounds kind of crazy, but there are hypnotists for weight loss that might help. My mom went to one and has been off soda for years, despite regularly drinking it before. It's kind of like the cognitive behavioral stuff, just a little weirder. :)
  • kandeelopez
    kandeelopez Posts: 61 Member
    edited September 2015
    SueInAz wrote: »
    I have heard of situations where there's no satiety trigger for some people; they literally aren't getting a signal from their body that they've had enough food. I'm not sure if that's your problem but it's worth getting professional help to deal with the problem if you have access to it.

    Many good responses here. I really liked this one and you should see a doctor, if you can.

    Also, it may be that you've merely become mentally obsessed with food but you can *redirect* your thoughts when this happens. In addition to what people have written here, also try chewing gum when hungry. I find it helps. When I'm becoming obsessed with troubles, or negative/sad thoughts (for example), I say to myself, "Be here now" to help myself focus on the task at hand (if I'm at work or even at home doing projects). Get a healthy hobby that requires *focus* and learning a new skill. Merely doing stuff like housework or other things that you can do by rote will not help, as you can be thinking your obsessive thoughts while doing them. I think you will find that you will learn a new skill or hobby, make new friends, and generally just "forget" this obsession!
  • dljones67
    dljones67 Posts: 88 Member
    Maybe you're trying to do too much too soon. Try making small, easy changes at first. Replace one soda per day, for instance, with water. Do that for a week until you master it. After that you might try to replace one snack per day with a healthy, portion-controlled alternative, and do that for a while until it too comes naturally. Remember that you don't have to do it all at once. Baby steps, you know? Make each little goal an easy one, something you are absolutely sure you can master, before you move on to the next.

    I really love this. Great advice. My addition would be drink an ice cold glass of water when cravings hit you & read postings on mfp. Both have helped me get through my craving & know I'm not alone in trying to lose weight. Plus I've learned so much. You can do it, remember, you have all us cheering you on :)

  • strong_curves
    strong_curves Posts: 2,229 Member
    Maybe it's time to seek professional help and not a weight loss doctor/clinic.
  • PinkPixiexox
    PinkPixiexox Posts: 4,142 Member
    I'd suggest speaking to your doctor who will possibly refer you to a therapist/counsellor. You can beat this but you'll need to address it and find out why you are addicted to food and what it's compensating for. I'm wishing you the best of luck. You can lose this weight :) You really can. But you need the tools and guidance first of all.
  • RobinDream
    RobinDream Posts: 1 Member
    Hi, I am reading a book called The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Diet Detox. You may find that some of what you are experiencing is addressed.
    Best of luck.

    http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Sugar-Solution-10-Day-Detox/dp/0316230022/ref=pd_sim_14_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1TSVJWEPY9ZKGAB7TG88&dpSrc=sims&dpST=_AC_UL320_SR206,320_