fish oil supplements

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I'm sure this is not a huge news breaker, but for those of us who don't get enough omega 3 in our diets, I find taking two gel capsules of fish oil supplements is awesome. I LOVE SEAFOOD but because I'm a college student on a budget.. I don't always have the funds to buy fish and shrimp and all the good stuff because it can be pricey lol . I'm sure I am not the only one who can agree. Yes supplements can be sorta kinda expensive (I get nature made brand) because at Kroger's you find good deals with buy one get one free. But anyhow.. I just wanted to throw this information out there for those of us who are unaware and might not always eat enough omega 3's . I can also say that after taking these supplements.. My body feels more energized and I tend to have good workouts afterwards, so it's definitely worth a try!
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  • socioseguro
    socioseguro Posts: 1,679 Member
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    You can also try Flaxseed ground and/or Chia seeds for Omega 3 . It does not have to be fish all the time.
    Good luck in your healthy journey
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    You can also try Flaxseed ground and/or Chia seeds for Omega 3 . It does not have to be fish all the time.
    Good luck in your healthy journey

    Never heard of either one of those. I'll have to look into it thank you
  • sheldonklein
    sheldonklein Posts: 854 Member
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    It won't do you any harm, but the claims that fish oil supplements provide health benefits is shaky, at best. As I understand it, there were some early, methodologically questionable, studies that showed big health benefits. Those studies triggered the fish oil craze. Studies since then do not show health benefits. http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/03/30/fish-oil-claims-not-supported-by-research/?referrer=
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    It won't do you any harm, but the claims that fish oil supplements provide health benefits is shaky, at best. As I understand it, there were some early, methodologically questionable, studies that showed big health benefits. Those studies triggered the fish oil craze. Studies since then do not show health benefits. http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/03/30/fish-oil-claims-not-supported-by-research/?referrer=

    Hmm well thank you. I'll do more research.. Although.. I found different information. I appreciate your insight
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    I guess each study is a bit different and although it may or may not have benefits.. It's still a plus when someone has NO fish in their diet at all. Which would be me lol. So it's benefiting those who can't afford fish or who don't eat fish. I do see the point in which the article is saying but I'm still benefiting from the omega 3 even if eating fish is better (obviously) I take mine daily and I feel a difference within myself so maybe everyone reacts to it differently..
  • earth_echo
    earth_echo Posts: 133 Member
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    Fish pills were *really* hard on my brother in law's liver and his doctor told him to stop taking them asap. And for me, they gave me heart palpitations. Yeah.........no, thanks.
  • starryphoenix
    starryphoenix Posts: 381 Member
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    Try Barleans omega 3 lemon or lime. It literally tastes better than pie.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    earth_echo wrote: »
    Fish pills were *really* hard on my brother in law's liver and his doctor told him to stop taking them asap. And for me, they gave me heart palpitations. Yeah.........no, thanks.

    Seriously?? How long were you on them??
  • sixxpoint
    sixxpoint Posts: 3,529 Member
    edited September 2015
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    1) Omega 3 Fish Oil is a great supplement for daily use, if properly dosed, molecularly distilled to remove impurities, third party tested, and derived from deep sea fish. Avoid 3-6-9 fish oil supplements. Omega 3 is the only one worth supplementing as the large majority of people get enough of the others in their diets.

    2) The number of capsules you take is entirely dependent on the EPA+DHA concentration of each capsule. Current recommendations are 2-3 grams of EPA+DHA per day for optimal benefits. Many brands do not offer a high enough concentration of EPA+DHA to satisfy the 2-3 gram dosage in just 3-4 capsules. Consequently, you end up having to take 8-10 capsules to satisfy the dosage if choosing a poor brand. Some great brands include Carlson Elite, SAN 3x Fish Fats, Nordic Naturals, Inner Armour Blue, Axis Labs Citrus, iForce Peppermint, and Controlled Labs Oxiomega.

    3) There is robust evidence on the health benefits of fish oil. Supplementation with a quality fish oil shouldn't harm anyone. Don't believe everything you hear on TV news -- Look at actual peer-reviewed studies and scientific journals for answers.

    You don't "feel" fish oil working after consuming it. It is not like caffeine. However, fish oil does have long term benefits such as joint health, brain health, lowering triglycerides and blood pressure, inflammation reduction, etc.

    4) Flaxseed, Chia seed, or other plant based oils are not a substitute for fish oil made from real fish; neither is Krill oil.

    Regarding ALA vs. EPA/DHA... they are not the same... Not by a long shot.

    The main problem with ALA is that to have the good effects attributed to omega-3s, it must be converted into EPA and DHA. The human body synthesizes ALA into EPA & DHA very poorly. The lack of conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA is due to competitive enzyme inhibition. As a result, only a small fraction of flax or chia seeds would have omega-3 fish oil's effects.

    Here are all the steps that ALA must take to become EPA and DHA:

    Alpha linolenic acid

    Δ-6 desaturase

    Octadecatetraenoic acid

    Elongase enzyme

    Eicosatetraenoic acid

    Δ5 desaturase

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)

    Elongase Enzyme

    Docosapentaenoic acid

    Δ4 desaturase

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
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    I have good blood chemistry whether I take these supplements or not (I've tried 6 months with, 6 months without), and I certainly do not feel anything when I take them or not.

    It's very unlikely that the feeling of being energized you report is coming from 15 calories worth of fat and is more imaginary than real.

    From the European Food Safety Authority:
    On the basis of the data available, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of EPA and DHA (and DPA for ID 511) and the maintenance of normal HDL-cholesterol concentrations, the maintenance of normal LDL-cholesterol concentrations, or the maintenance of normal joints

    Are their more recent peer review studies that shed new light on this?
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    mwyvr wrote: »
    I have good blood chemistry whether I take these supplements or not (I've tried 6 months with, 6 months without), and I certainly do not feel anything when I take them or not.

    It's very unlikely that the feeling of being energized you report is coming from 15 calories worth of fat and is more imaginary than real.

    From the European Food Safety Authority:
    On the basis of the data available, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of EPA and DHA (and DPA for ID 511) and the maintenance of normal HDL-cholesterol concentrations, the maintenance of normal LDL-cholesterol concentrations, or the maintenance of normal joints

    Are their more recent peer review studies that shed new light on this?

    I hate to argue or something petty that may or may not work for everyone. But in my opinion and from the results I have gotten.. It has changed my energy level before working out. No it's not coffee or chocolate.. It's fish oil and just because you did your own study does not mean it doesn't do something different to others.. As proven by the people above who also have different views. Not to mention I'm in a degree for exercise Science and I found my own studies and my professors also have stood by the fact it can in indeed make a difference in the body in a positive way. Now whether or not you prefer it is fine, but don't put me down because of what I have experienced because there is no way you can prove to me I didn't feel this unless you could switch bodies. Lol just saying. With that I do respect your side of things but it doesn't change my thoughts and opinions.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    mwyvr wrote: »
    I have good blood chemistry whether I take these supplements or not (I've tried 6 months with, 6 months without), and I certainly do not feel anything when I take them or not.

    It's very unlikely that the feeling of being energized you report is coming from 15 calories worth of fat and is more imaginary than real.

    From the European Food Safety Authority:
    On the basis of the data available, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of EPA and DHA (and DPA for ID 511) and the maintenance of normal HDL-cholesterol concentrations, the maintenance of normal LDL-cholesterol concentrations, or the maintenance of normal joints

    Are their more recent peer review studies that shed new light on this?

    And it's actually 20 calories lol so maybe we had different brands as well.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    sixxpoint wrote: »
    1) Omega 3 Fish Oil is a great supplement for daily use, if properly dosed, molecularly distilled to remove impurities, third party tested, and derived from deep sea fish. Avoid 3-6-9 fish oil supplements. Omega 3 is the only one worth supplementing as the large majority of people get enough of the others in their diets.

    2) The number of capsules you take is entirely dependent on the EPA+DHA concentration of each capsule. Current recommendations are 2-3 grams of EPA+DHA per day for optimal benefits. Many brands do not offer a high enough concentration of EPA+DHA to satisfy the 2-3 gram dosage in just 3-4 capsules. Consequently, you end up having to take 8-10 capsules to satisfy the dosage if choosing a poor brand. Some great brands include Carlson Elite, SAN 3x Fish Fats, Nordic Naturals, Inner Armour Blue, Axis Labs Citrus, iForce Peppermint, and Controlled Labs Oxiomega.

    3) There is robust evidence on the health benefits of fish oil. Supplementation with a quality fish oil shouldn't harm anyone. Don't believe everything you hear on TV news -- Look at actual peer-reviewed studies and scientific journals for answers.

    You don't "feel" fish oil working after consuming it. It is not like caffeine. However, fish oil does have long term benefits such as joint health, brain health, lowering triglycerides and blood pressure, inflammation reduction, etc.

    4) Flaxseed, Chia seed, or other plant based oils are not a substitute for fish oil made from real fish; neither is Krill oil.

    Regarding ALA vs. EPA/DHA... they are not the same... Not by a long shot.

    The main problem with ALA is that to have the good effects attributed to omega-3s, it must be converted into EPA and DHA. The human body synthesizes ALA into EPA & DHA very poorly. The lack of conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA is due to competitive enzyme inhibition. As a result, only a small fraction of flax or chia seeds would have omega-3 fish oil's effects.

    Here are all the steps that ALA must take to become EPA and DHA:

    Alpha linolenic acid

    Δ-6 desaturase

    Octadecatetraenoic acid

    Elongase enzyme

    Eicosatetraenoic acid

    Δ5 desaturase

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)

    Elongase Enzyme

    Docosapentaenoic acid

    Δ4 desaturase

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

    Thank you for taking time out of your day to explain all the science behind fish oil supplements. I appreciate it. It definitely sheds light on different things to consider and I'm happy someone brought so much information to the discussion. I read everything!! Very informative!!!
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    edited September 2015
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    I'm not opposed to taking them but I'm not at all certain I get anything out of them. I do eat wild salmon on a regular basis, it's native to our waters here in BC; walnuts reasonably regularly too.

    Like many things we can find studies pro and con.

    A 2003 study indicated a potential benefit in the reduction of certain cancers including prostate cancer.

    Ok, great!

    But wait, the American Cancer Society published an article citing studies Omega 3 concentrations with increased risk of prostate cancer and increase risk of aggressive prostate cancer..
    they found that those with the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids had a 43% higher risk of developing prostate cancer, and a 71% higher chance of developing high-grade prostate cancer, which is more likely to be fatal. Previous studies found similar results.

    Of course you'll find dissenting views on that and many studies. You might note in that article that in part they dismiss the usefulness of the aforementioned study because prostate cancer only affects men and older men at that.

    Well, as a man and one who falls in the 'older' slice when it comes to prostate cancer, I'm not sure I like their playfulness with statistics.

    Meanwhile, in heart health, does it help? Some say yes, some say no. An Italian study comprising > 12,000 individuals showed no significant benefit in the reduction of cardiovascular mortality/morbidity.

    The risk with taking supplements may be in overdoing it; is there a controlled study showing a safe dosage that takes into account all factors of the participants regular diet?

    Personally I like what Marji McCullough, ScD, RD, strategic director of nutritional epidemiology for the American Cancer Society has to say on sourcing nutrients:
    “In general, it’s better to try to get nutrients from foods and eat an overall healthy diet."

    Or that of food author Michael Pollan:
    “Eat food. Not too much. Mainly plants.”

    Doing the above and dropping significant weight, not taking Omega 3 supplements, reduced my triglycerides to a very low level. Study of one.
  • feisty_bucket
    feisty_bucket Posts: 1,047 Member
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    IMO, the main point to fish oil isn't your heart, it's your brain/nervous system.
    That goes for a high-fat diet in general.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    IMO, the main point to fish oil isn't your heart, it's your brain/nervous system.
    That goes for a high-fat diet in general.

    Hmm okay
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    edited September 2015
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    IMO, the main point to fish oil isn't your heart, it's your brain/nervous system.
    That goes for a high-fat diet in general.

    Hmm okay

    Fats are important to our health.

    You are starting to see recognition in the form of peer reviewed studies that the long focus on low fat, low cholesterol diets has been somewhat off-base.
  • Fitness_WonderWoman
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    mwyvr wrote: »
    IMO, the main point to fish oil isn't your heart, it's your brain/nervous system.
    That goes for a high-fat diet in general.

    Hmm okay

    Fats are important to our health.

    You are starting to see recognition in the form of peer reviewed studies that the long focus on low fat, low cholesterol diets has been somewhat off-base.

    Oh yes I totally agree. I think too many people see fats as a bad thing when really it's not so bad. Obviously some fats are bad.. And not needed. But there is a such thing as good fats. Totally agree.
  • sheldonklein
    sheldonklein Posts: 854 Member
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    From the NYT article cited above:

    The vast majority of clinical trials involving fish oil have found no evidence that it lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke.

    From 2005 to 2012, at least two dozen rigorous studies of fish oil were published in leading medical journals, most of which looked at whether fish oil could prevent cardiovascular events in high-risk populations. These were people who had a history of heart disease or strong risk factors for it, like high cholesterol, hypertension or Type 2 diabetes.

    All but two of these studies found that compared with a placebo, fish oil showed no benefit.
  • jdwalt1
    jdwalt1 Posts: 1 Member
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    Dr. Barry Sears has done a good deal of research into fish oil - this is his response to the research that showed fish oil wasn't effective...to summarize, basically the studies weren't using a high enough level of fish oil to make a difference. http://www.zonediet.com/blog/fish-oil-and-heart-disease-the-real-facts-part-2/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=blog20150714&CatAdReferrer=blog20150714&mc_cid=a3c580ca5c&mc_eid=9681573464