Dieting it's been so hard

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I love food but it doesn't move me back. In the last 6 months I've gained about 30 pounds. I go to the gym 3-4 times a week. I know it's my diet but why is it going up?

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  • queenliz99
    queenliz99 Posts: 15,317 Member
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    Because you eating more than you burn :)
  • seska422
    seska422 Posts: 3,217 Member
    edited September 2015
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    Exercise is great for overall health but weight loss mostly depends upon making sure that you are eating fewer calories than your body uses during the day. Weight loss happens in the kitchen.

    cdaqxqoo4pr2.jpg
  • zoeysasha37
    zoeysasha37 Posts: 7,089 Member
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    seska422 wrote: »
    Exercise is great for overall health but weight loss mostly depends upon making sure that you are eating fewer calories than your body uses during the day. Weight loss happens in the kitchen.

    cdaqxqoo4pr2.jpg

    Use the lemonlionheart chart above. It's good info !
    If your not losing, your not eating at a deficit. Are you using a food scale .accuracy will help you a lot !
  • LadyLots2Lose
    LadyLots2Lose Posts: 110 Member
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    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.


  • PinkPixiexox
    PinkPixiexox Posts: 4,142 Member
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    I'm familiar with this! :]

    I stopped tracking my food and stopped caring about what I ate for a few months. I still went to the gym 3 times a week but basically, the 'diet' was out the window! After weighing myself a few months later, I had gained 28lbs. I was horrified. The "I don't care anymore" attitude about my food caused significant weight gain despite working out because your diet is the most crucial aspect of weight loss! I certainly changed my ways after that! :]
  • sheldonklein
    sheldonklein Posts: 854 Member
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    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.


    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
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    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.


    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?

    from the extra sugar....
  • sashayoung72
    sashayoung72 Posts: 441 Member
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    I'm familiar with this! :]

    I stopped tracking my food and stopped caring about what I ate for a few months. I still went to the gym 3 times a week but basically, the 'diet' was out the window! After weighing myself a few months later, I had gained 28lbs. I was horrified. The "I don't care anymore" attitude about my food caused significant weight gain despite working out because your diet is the most crucial aspect of weight loss! I certainly changed my ways after that! :]

    It happens to the best of us, @PinkPixiexox is giving you her example
    seska422 wrote: »
    Exercise is great for overall health but weight loss mostly depends upon making sure that you are eating fewer calories than your body uses during the day. Weight loss happens in the kitchen.

    cdaqxqoo4pr2.jpg
    You simply have to log your food, pretty much no way around it if you are gaining that fast you need to pay attention wholeheartedly and MINDFULLY of what you are putting you your mouth.
  • 999tigger
    999tigger Posts: 5,235 Member
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    Because you are eating more than your body needs, even taking into account the calories you burn at the gym.
    Eat less so you are at deficit.
  • seska422
    seska422 Posts: 3,217 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.
    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?
    from the extra sugar....
    Gaining weight in a deficit is in no way the same as having a BMI in the healthy weight range and yet a higher body fat percentage than is considered healthy. The first thing is like having your car's gas tank getting more full as you drive rather than less full. The latter is just due to how BMI is defined.

    The only way that "extra sugar" or "eating too much of one type of food" would cause weight gain is if that action caused a calorie surplus. Extra water intake is encouraged for a feeling of fullness but extra water doesn't burn extra calories.

    Food type doesn't matter for weight loss, only calorie content. 30 pounds gained means 105,000 more calories were consumed than used over that period of time.
  • NoIdea101NoIdea
    NoIdea101NoIdea Posts: 659 Member
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    seska422 wrote: »
    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.
    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?
    from the extra sugar....
    Gaining weight in a deficit is in no way the same as having a BMI in the healthy weight range and yet a higher body fat percentage than is considered healthy. The first thing is like having your car's gas tank getting more full as you drive rather than less full. The latter is just due to how BMI is defined.

    The only way that "extra sugar" or "eating too much of one type of food" would cause weight gain is if that action caused a calorie surplus. Extra water intake is encouraged for a feeling of fullness but extra water doesn't burn extra calories.

    Food type doesn't matter for weight loss, only calorie content. 30 pounds gained means 105,000 more calories were consumed than used over that period of time.

    I thought the extra sugar comment was sarcasm.......?
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,719 Member
    Options
    seska422 wrote: »
    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.
    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?
    from the extra sugar....
    Gaining weight in a deficit is in no way the same as having a BMI in the healthy weight range and yet a higher body fat percentage than is considered healthy. The first thing is like having your car's gas tank getting more full as you drive rather than less full. The latter is just due to how BMI is defined.

    The only way that "extra sugar" or "eating too much of one type of food" would cause weight gain is if that action caused a calorie surplus. Extra water intake is encouraged for a feeling of fullness but extra water doesn't burn extra calories.

    Food type doesn't matter for weight loss, only calorie content. 30 pounds gained means 105,000 more calories were consumed than used over that period of time.

    I thought the extra sugar comment was sarcasm.......?

    it was.... :laugh:
  • Matt200goal
    Matt200goal Posts: 481 Member
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    Awesome flow chart. I too am an example of "You can't out-run your fork" syndrome.

    Weight loss is primarily dependent on eating habits - exercise for fitness.
    seska422 wrote: »
    Exercise is great for overall health but weight loss mostly depends upon making sure that you are eating fewer calories than your body uses during the day. Weight loss happens in the kitchen.

    cdaqxqoo4pr2.jpg

  • seska422
    seska422 Posts: 3,217 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    seska422 wrote: »
    If you know that your diet needs work, that's a good place to start. Sometimes it can be a simple case of calories in exceeding calories out but, this isn't always the case. In my experience its possible to have a calorie deficit and still add kilos if the food you're eating isn't appropriately balanced (just as it is possible to have a BMI in the healthy range and a body fat percentage that is unhealthy (i.e. "Skinny fat").

    I'd suggest having a good look at the types and quantities of the food you're consuming on a regular basis and see if there's a trend emerging that might be sabotaging your efforts. It might be as simple as a bit of extra sugar creeping into your daily habit, eating too much of one type of food or not drinking enough water. Make sure you log your food consistently and honestly for at least a month. If there's nothing changes and you're still stuck on a cause you may need to seek advice from your GP or a registered nutritionist to help in narrowing down the issue.
    Best of luck with the journey.
    You're suggesting that she could have gained 30 pounds in 6 months while eating in a deficit?
    from the extra sugar....
    Gaining weight in a deficit is in no way the same as having a BMI in the healthy weight range and yet a higher body fat percentage than is considered healthy. The first thing is like having your car's gas tank getting more full as you drive rather than less full. The latter is just due to how BMI is defined.

    The only way that "extra sugar" or "eating too much of one type of food" would cause weight gain is if that action caused a calorie surplus. Extra water intake is encouraged for a feeling of fullness but extra water doesn't burn extra calories.

    Food type doesn't matter for weight loss, only calorie content. 30 pounds gained means 105,000 more calories were consumed than used over that period of time.
    I thought the extra sugar comment was sarcasm.......?
    it was.... :laugh:
    Yours was sarcasm but the post from LadyLots2Lose that I quoted specified extra sugar and I didn't notice that you were a different poster. I should have "This"ed sheldonklein's post.