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Whole30 diet -thoughts?

2

Replies

  • Swanson83
    Swanson83 Posts: 226 Member
    I haven't experience the Whole 30 diet but my sister-in-law did it. (She didn't do it for weight loss purposes.) She found out she was lactose intolerant and that certain foods react with her body in a bad way. Like if she eats certain processed foods she goes numb around her body. So I have thought about trying it just to see if I have foods that I should avoid but I wouldn't do it for weight loss purposes. She did lose weight and has kept it off but she didn't care too much about that.
  • Aeryn24
    Aeryn24 Posts: 34 Member
    Kimbot88 wrote: »
    Thank you for an informative response! I would probably continue weighing myself as well. Do you notice that your cravings for sweets or carbs have diminished?

    If I find myself craving something sweet, lately I find that having a sweet potato or organic apple sauce is enough sweetness for me to be satisfied. The thing I've been craving the most today though? Cheese. LOL.

    Here's what I've noticed too, I had a massive headache on day 3. I was a little worried about it, but then I found an FAQ on Whole 30 that mentions that many people do experience headaches around that time. Perhaps it's a sign of withdrawal from what your body is used to having.

  • lgt2015
    lgt2015 Posts: 30 Member
    Whole30 is not about weight loss. It's about uncovering food issues, physical and mental. I knew before I ever did whole30 that dairy is a problem for me, but I didn't realize the extent. Now I know if I have a cream sauce, cheese, or ice cream I can expect breakouts and a poor nights sleep. I also know that too many eggs = hives for me, so I've backed way off my egg consumption. And I knew it before, but whole30 helped me see exactly how bad my sugar addiction is and that there is sugar in absolutely everything processed!

    If you don't like the way you're feeling -- bloated, tired, skin breaking out -- whole30 is worth a shot, and really, it's only 30 days. But please don't bother with it if you're just looking for a quick way to lose weight.
  • JillStepanik
    JillStepanik Posts: 13 Member
    I personally think it is nuts. To be that restrictive is pretty much setting yourself up for failure. Think about when your friends or parents ask you go to our to dinner- you wouldn't be able to because of the crazy rules to follow!
    Although some concepts are things to keep in mind (knocking out some processed foods and sugary treats), it isn't a lifestyle I would ever recommend to my patients or follow myself.
  • PennyHartz
    PennyHartz Posts: 49 Member
    I've thought about doing it to help with my sugar addiction, not for weight loss. I am very close to my goal weight, which I have achieved through calorie counting and exercise. However, I still consume way too much sugar and it is extremely difficult for me to just "cut back". I've read the book and I think completing a round of Whole 30 might help, but I'm not sure I would be able to withstand the restriction.
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    I personally think it is nuts. To be that restrictive is pretty much setting yourself up for failure. Think about when your friends or parents ask you go to our to dinner- you wouldn't be able to because of the crazy rules to follow!
    Although some concepts are things to keep in mind (knocking out some processed foods and sugary treats), it isn't a lifestyle I would ever recommend to my patients or follow myself.

    You're right about eating out. Eating out a restaurant would be hard, although I believe they offer some kind of guidelines for ordering. Still, you couldn't just order anything off the menu, as-is.

    I don't think it's intended to be a "lifestyle." Following those rules for LIFE would be very hard. Are you a doctor? It's very interesting to see the perspective of someone IN the medical field. Thanks for your response. :) I am amazingly still considering this.
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    PennyHartz wrote: »
    I've thought about doing it to help with my sugar addiction, not for weight loss. I am very close to my goal weight, which I have achieved through calorie counting and exercise. However, I still consume way too much sugar and it is extremely difficult for me to just "cut back". I've read the book and I think completing a round of Whole 30 might help, but I'm not sure I would be able to withstand the restriction.

    Seems like you're like me. I have a tremendous sugar addiction and generally don't feel good a lot of the time. If it could really make my crVings go away and hit the "reset" button, I think it would be worth it. But I don't know if I could do it because i really do have a bad addiction. I am thinking about buying the book though.
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    lgt2015 wrote: »
    Whole30 is not about weight loss. It's about uncovering food issues, physical and mental. I knew before I ever did whole30 that dairy is a problem for me, but I didn't realize the extent. Now I know if I have a cream sauce, cheese, or ice cream I can expect breakouts and a poor nights sleep. I also know that too many eggs = hives for me, so I've backed way off my egg consumption. And I knew it before, but whole30 helped me see exactly how bad my sugar addiction is and that there is sugar in absolutely everything processed!

    If you don't like the way you're feeling -- bloated, tired, skin breaking out -- whole30 is worth a shot, and really, it's only 30 days. But please don't bother with it if you're just looking for a quick way to lose weight.

    I don't like the way I feel. I am tired and bloated all the time. I have autoimmune disorders. I have asthma and stomach issues. I am addicted to sugar. I know that if I eat wheat my stomach will hurt. But only certain types of wheat and I am not celiac (I was tested). I know dairy affects me to a point. I would love to be able to do the whole30 but I don't know if I could. But I really am considering it. I think I'm going to buy the book so I can read more about the science behind it.
  • skm1129
    skm1129 Posts: 3 Member
    Kimbot, I really think you should give it a shot. A friend told me about the Whole30 and i refused to listen. She asked me to read It Starts With Food, and halfway through the book I knew I had to try it. I have Hashimoto's, lupus, anxiety, severe seasonal allergies, and lots of stomach issues. I ALWAYS felt sick, every single day. Well I am on Day 17 and I have never felt so great!!! My thyroid is making me feel miserable and tired anymore, my joints don't ache from the lupus, and I haven't had an anxiety attack all this time! I can finally breath too, no allergies! I am still taking my meds for everything, but before even with meds nothing seemed to help. I have stomach issues now when I eat certain things on the Whole30 so I am learning more about what foods to avoid.

    With all my health problems losing weight has ALWAYS been difficult, but I did the Whole30 strictly for health reasons. However, I haven't weighed and I am going to wait till the end, but I know I've lost quit a bit of weight I can't wait to weigh (I've never said that before)!

    You should really give it a try especially if you're sick of feeling lousy. I think once my 30 days are over I may eat some ice cream and a cheeseburger and some rice for a week then start back again!
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    skm1129 wrote: »
    Kimbot, I really think you should give it a shot. A friend told me about the Whole30 and i refused to listen. She asked me to read It Starts With Food, and halfway through the book I knew I had to try it. I have Hashimoto's, lupus, anxiety, severe seasonal allergies, and lots of stomach issues. I ALWAYS felt sick, every single day. Well I am on Day 17 and I have never felt so great!!! My thyroid is making me feel miserable and tired anymore, my joints don't ache from the lupus, and I haven't had an anxiety attack all this time! I can finally breath too, no allergies! I am still taking my meds for everything, but before even with meds nothing seemed to help. I have stomach issues now when I eat certain things on the Whole30 so I am learning more about what foods to avoid.

    With all my health problems losing weight has ALWAYS been difficult, but I did the Whole30 strictly for health reasons. However, I haven't weighed and I am going to wait till the end, but I know I've lost quit a bit of weight I can't wait to weigh (I've never said that before)!

    You should really give it a try especially if you're sick of feeling lousy. I think once my 30 days are over I may eat some ice cream and a cheeseburger and some rice for a week then start back again!

    I think I really am going to try it. You sound a lot like me with all the medical issues. I would love to feel better. Thank you for your response!!
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,891 Member
    You have provided more information, that makes thing more interesting. So I want to add: Decide why you would want to try it and whether you think this method will be effective, and how you will know that it worked, and what it was that worked. Are your ailments actual, or just hypes? I see a lot of "bloating" and "inflammation" these days - are these real medical conditions, but not treatable by your doctor? An improvement of your diet will make you feel better, but there is no proof that any particular diet is the best; the best diet for you is one that gives you what you need nutritionally, and one you can adhere to because you like to eat that way.

    The practical aspects of following the Whole 30 diet are tough, but you could stay away from eating with family and friends for 30 days; it is possible to do if it will help for anything. But the not-so-well hidden threat that you have to start again if you slip up, makes me think this is just another sham. A good diet and a healthy eating style allows for occasional indulgences.

    Cravings can be terrible. Find out if when your cravings increase or decrease; when you restrict, or when you eat too much of the things you get cravings for? If they get worse when you restrict, chances are Whole 30 won't help you with them. A balanced and varied diet that provides all essential nutrients, that you find tasty and practical, and good eating habits, including some less nutritious treats if that works best for you, is most likely your best defense against annoying cravings. This has been my experience, at least.
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    You have provided more information, that makes thing more interesting. So I want to add: Decide why you would want to try it and whether you think this method will be effective, and how you will know that it worked, and what it was that worked. Are your ailments actual, or just hypes? I see a lot of "bloating" and "inflammation" these days - are these real medical conditions, but not treatable by your doctor? An improvement of your diet will make you feel better, but there is no proof that any particular diet is the best; the best diet for you is one that gives you what you need nutritionally, and one you can adhere to because you like to eat that way.

    The practical aspects of following the Whole 30 diet are tough, but you could stay away from eating with family and friends for 30 days; it is possible to do if it will help for anything. But the not-so-well hidden threat that you have to start again if you slip up, makes me think this is just another sham. A good diet and a healthy eating style allows for occasional indulgences.

    Cravings can be terrible. Find out if when your cravings increase or decrease; when you restrict, or when you eat too much of the things you get cravings for? If they get worse when you restrict, chances are Whole 30 won't help you with them. A balanced and varied diet that provides all essential nutrients, that you find tasty and practical, and good eating habits, including some less nutritious treats if that works best for you, is most likely your best defense against annoying cravings. This has been my experience, at least.

    Thanks for your response. My ailments are "actual" ailments. My bloating is caused by specific foods but also because I have some "female" issues. My autoimmune disorders include alopecia, lymph node issues, and raynauds, though those are usually not caused by any diet or deficiency. It's just my body reacting against itself. I have severe anxiety and depression that admittedly gets a little better when I eat more "healthy" foods and less breads and sugars. And my asthma is just that, not likely to be cured with food but I guess you never know. I am not sure what exactly is up with my stomach. Sometimes it hurts after food and sometimes not. But it's terrible pain that has had me curled up on the floor in the past. Doctors wanted to do further testing but I have yet to do that. I am always tired too. I need to get an updated blood test because my last one was years ago. And I know I should see a doctor about my stomach again. That might reveal something. But it might not. I eat good healthy foods most of the time. The worst thing is when I slip and have a piece of chocolate or white bread. I rarely drink alcohol.

    With regard to cravings, they do in a way get worse when I restrict. But the longer I hold off the easier it is to manage. With sugar, if I have a little bit, it is likely to lead to a binge. So moderation isn't really even an option.

    My purpose for doing the whole30 would be to see how my body reacts when I only give it "basic" foods. If I feel better or if I feel the same. If I can truly "cure" myself of my sugar addiction. Obviously I would not adhere to ALL of the whole30 rules for the rest of my life. Only the 30 days. Then I would slowly introduce something like oatmeal or legumes and see how my body reacts.

    Unfortunately I am easily persuaded to do the latest fad. Although I have gotten a lot better about it. I have friends selling Plexus and sometimes I think about it, even though deep down I know the benefits are exaggerated and no product can replace a good diet. Same with "healthy chocolate"/xocai. But I don't know, this kinda seems like it makes sense. Then again, most things do when you back it with a splash of science and testimonials.

    I just want to feel better (and maybe (ok definitely) lose ten pounds along the way).
  • Aeryn24
    Aeryn24 Posts: 34 Member
    Kimbot, that's the same reason why I'm on Whole 30. My autoimmune issues are stacking up. I have to say this - the bloating has gone WAY down. I am SO happy. I thought I just had to live with the belly bloat for the rest of my life. I will tell you this, there will be some rough days. Even flu-like symptoms as your body gets used to not having all that food you're used to. But stick with it, it does get better.

    I'm on day 11 and I'm starting to feel perkier!
  • BarbieAS
    BarbieAS Posts: 1,444 Member
    I've read the Whole 30 books and followed the eating plan. I think that it's one of those last-ditch things that you try when you feel crappy most of the time but conventional medicine either can't find something that's causing it or can't adequately treat whatever it is. But I also think it can be really valuable for those people. I don't know enough to feel confident on whether the science is sound or not, but it's undeniable that some people FEEL infinitely better with certain dietary changes, and my personal opinion on stuff like this is that if it works it doesn't matter WHY it works, just that it helps. You know? It's not going to help everyone with every ailment. It may be that some people are just way more sensitive to certain dietary things. It's not for everyone. But for the people it DOES help, it can turn their quality of life around 180 degrees.

    I highly recommend actually reading the books if you haven't. They lay out a very detailed plan for re-introducing foods into your diet. The whole purpose of Whole 30 is to eliminate everything that might be bothering your body, and then re-introduce different foods in a way that you know what you can include in your diet on an on-going basis without ill effects, and what foods you react poorly to and you should avoid - or at least you can make informed decisions on whether or not it's ok to eat that food at a particular time. Maybe it's a dish you only get at a certain holiday, so it's worth some serious gas to eat your grandma's spanakopita once a year, but it's not worth it to just grab a slice of pizza with friends on a random Friday. Or maybe you know that a single cookie won't bother you, but a huge plate of pancakes is going to set you up for 3 days of joint pain. Or maybe you've reintroduced legumes and wheat with no problem, so you can keep eating those all the time, but dairy and corn make you feel like a mess so you avoid those. You're not supposed to follow Whole 30 for the rest of your life. You're supposed to eat Whole 30-ish for the rest of your life, armed with enough information to know how certain foods work in your body and make informed decisions on how to eat in a balanced way that best fits your health and your lifestyle.

    Or, maybe you go through the reintroduction plan and nothing bothers you at all. Maybe you're just not one of the people who is helped by dietary restrictions. That stinks, but what will you have lost by trying? A month of foods you love. It's up to you to decide if that's worth it or not - for some people, it absolutely isn't, and that's ok.

    Best of luck to you!
  • JillStepanik
    JillStepanik Posts: 13 Member
    Kimbot88 wrote: »
    I personally think it is nuts. To be that restrictive is pretty much setting yourself up for failure. Think about when your friends or parents ask you go to our to dinner- you wouldn't be able to because of the crazy rules to follow!
    Although some concepts are things to keep in mind (knocking out some processed foods and sugary treats), it isn't a lifestyle I would ever recommend to my patients or follow myself.

    You're right about eating out. Eating out a restaurant would be hard, although I believe they offer some kind of guidelines for ordering. Still, you couldn't just order anything off the menu, as-is.

    I don't think it's intended to be a "lifestyle." Following those rules for LIFE would be very hard. Are you a doctor? It's very interesting to see the perspective of someone IN the medical field. Thanks for your response. :) I am amazingly still considering this.


    I'm actually Registered Dietitian with a master's in nutrition
  • urloved33
    urloved33 Posts: 3,361 Member
    I tried this - it was prompted by my daughter - we did it together and as challenging as it was i;d do it again.
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    Kimbot88 wrote: »
    I personally think it is nuts. To be that restrictive is pretty much setting yourself up for failure. Think about when your friends or parents ask you go to our to dinner- you wouldn't be able to because of the crazy rules to follow!
    Although some concepts are things to keep in mind (knocking out some processed foods and sugary treats), it isn't a lifestyle I would ever recommend to my patients or follow myself.

    You're right about eating out. Eating out a restaurant would be hard, although I believe they offer some kind of guidelines for ordering. Still, you couldn't just order anything off the menu, as-is.

    I don't think it's intended to be a "lifestyle." Following those rules for LIFE would be very hard. Are you a doctor? It's very interesting to see the perspective of someone IN the medical field. Thanks for your response. :) I am amazingly still considering this.


    I'm actually Registered Dietitian with a master's in nutrition

    I would say you're pretty qualified then!
  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    Aeryn24 wrote: »
    Kimbot, that's the same reason why I'm on Whole 30. My autoimmune issues are stacking up. I have to say this - the bloating has gone WAY down. I am SO happy. I thought I just had to live with the belly bloat for the rest of my life. I will tell you this, there will be some rough days. Even flu-like symptoms as your body gets used to not having all that food you're used to. But stick with it, it does get better.

    I'm on day 11 and I'm starting to feel perkier!

    I appreciate your response! I'm glad it's working for you!!

  • Kimbot88
    Kimbot88 Posts: 109 Member
    BarbieAS wrote: »
    I've read the Whole 30 books and followed the eating plan. I think that it's one of those last-ditch things that you try when you feel crappy most of the time but conventional medicine either can't find something that's causing it or can't adequately treat whatever it is. But I also think it can be really valuable for those people. I don't know enough to feel confident on whether the science is sound or not, but it's undeniable that some people FEEL infinitely better with certain dietary changes, and my personal opinion on stuff like this is that if it works it doesn't matter WHY it works, just that it helps. You know? It's not going to help everyone with every ailment. It may be that some people are just way more sensitive to certain dietary things. It's not for everyone. But for the people it DOES help, it can turn their quality of life around 180 degrees.

    I highly recommend actually reading the books if you haven't. They lay out a very detailed plan for re-introducing foods into your diet. The whole purpose of Whole 30 is to eliminate everything that might be bothering your body, and then re-introduce different foods in a way that you know what you can include in your diet on an on-going basis without ill effects, and what foods you react poorly to and you should avoid - or at least you can make informed decisions on whether or not it's ok to eat that food at a particular time. Maybe it's a dish you only get at a certain holiday, so it's worth some serious gas to eat your grandma's spanakopita once a year, but it's not worth it to just grab a slice of pizza with friends on a random Friday. Or maybe you know that a single cookie won't bother you, but a huge plate of pancakes is going to set you up for 3 days of joint pain. Or maybe you've reintroduced legumes and wheat with no problem, so you can keep eating those all the time, but dairy and corn make you feel like a mess so you avoid those. You're not supposed to follow Whole 30 for the rest of your life. You're supposed to eat Whole 30-ish for the rest of your life, armed with enough information to know how certain foods work in your body and make informed decisions on how to eat in a balanced way that best fits your health and your lifestyle.

    Or, maybe you go through the reintroduction plan and nothing bothers you at all. Maybe you're just not one of the people who is helped by dietary restrictions. That stinks, but what will you have lost by trying? A month of foods you love. It's up to you to decide if that's worth it or not - for some people, it absolutely isn't, and that's ok.

    Best of luck to you!

    Thank you so much for such a thorough response. I appreciate it. It absolutely could not hurt to try the whole 30.

    And now I want spanakopita.
  • kkzmom11
    kkzmom11 Posts: 267 Member
    IMHO, ANY "plan" that restricts a certain food group or any food in general is a HORRIBLE idea. i am with others that say calories in vs calories out is the way to go. i will certainly eat less of the foods that cause me problems, but i can't live my life doing without any certain foods. it's a recipe for disaster.