$30, 9 days, empty fridge

Alright, you savvy MFP's. I have $30, 9 days til payday, and an empty fridge but for about a pound of chicken and bag of brown rice.

Please share all your frugal meal suggestions for this broke little dieter trying to stay on the fed and healthy path.

I intend to buy skim milk, bananas, some tuna, and eggs. What else might I add as filling staples for meals?

Thank you all in advance!
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Replies

  • devilwhiterose
    devilwhiterose Posts: 1,157 Member
    Beans. Bags of beans. Cheap, easy, protein.
    Peanut Butter
    Tortillas maybe...

    Breakfast - Eggs, bananas, peanut butter, apples.

    Lunch/Dinner - Have some chicken, use leftovers for sandwiches/fajitas/wraps. Use remaining leftovers for soup/stew. Add beans and water/broth and a can of rotel. Tuna...make tuna melts with cheese and tortillas.
  • sixxpoint
    sixxpoint Posts: 3,529 Member
    Change that skim milk to whole milk. You're going to need that extra dietary fat if you are planning on eating for just $3.33 per day.

    Check out potatoes, peanut butter, beans/lentils, pasta, and just about any fruit and veggie at a reasonably priced store.
  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    Milk is a little pricey, so depending on how much you love milk, you could pass on that one in my opinion (also depends on your ability to hit protein goals without it). I'd definitely buy some frozen vegetables, and I'm hoping you already have a stock of spices available.

    Do you own flour? You could easily make your own bread by picking up some active yeast, which is super cheap. Also I'd recommend some dried black beans or lentils. Combine those with rice, and you have a complete protein. Peanut butter is cheap and can add some extra calories if needed. I buy large tubs of greek yogurt; again, they can be a little pricey, so depends on protein goals. Honestly, I feel like that's a ton of money for 9 days. Cook up the chicken in some spices and combine with different things (rice and black beans for a mexican dish, with lettuce for some salads, with BBQ sauce for some pulled chicken sandwiches. For snacks you can pick up a huge block of cheese and portion it out or have some fruit.
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,372 Member
    You can buy a big package of chicken quarters or legs for less than $5 here. Might be worth it... that would last me 5-6 meals.

    Otherwise - oatmeal, rice, beans. With chicken and eggs that would be a few meals there. And frozen veggies with whatever you have left.

    I'd probably pass on the apples because they're still close to $1 each unless you find a really good sale on them... bananas are cheaper.

    I wouldn't buy milk either, but to each their own.
  • urloved33
    urloved33 Posts: 3,325 Member
    edited September 2015
    two words. food bank

    there is no shame in getting help. also a box of cereal goes a very long way w milk can be filling and nutritious.
  • spacelump
    spacelump Posts: 233 Member
    Food bank is a great suggestion. I will look into some local ones today. I'm not above receiving help, but I would hate to take and another more in need person not receive.

    I suppose milk isn't necessary. I think it's one of those things I just buy automatically. (We never had it as kids). But 2% is indeed wiser when we are talking needed calories.

    Yes! I forgot about oatmeal and beans! I can get some cheap chicken, peanut butter, eggs, bananas, sometimes they have clearance Greek yogurt (because it expires in a week).

    I'll tell you...I'm a very sad cook, so trying to make my own bread might be a stretch for me, but I can certainly try, right? I'll find out where they hide the active yeast. It's a good season to learn.
  • lauries8888
    lauries8888 Posts: 70 Member
    The yeast is in the refrigerator section. I looked for a very long time in the baking aisles of various stores before I finally asked someone. Who knew?
  • lauries8888
    lauries8888 Posts: 70 Member
    I love ramen noodles (20 cents each!). I only use half the flavor pack and I add 1/3 bag of mixed frozen vegs. and some scrambled egg or chicken for protein.
  • TeaBea
    TeaBea Posts: 14,517 Member
    edited September 2015
    spacelump wrote: »
    Food bank is a great suggestion. I will look into some local ones today. I'm not above receiving help, but I would hate to take and another more in need person not receive.

    I suppose milk isn't necessary. I think it's one of those things I just buy automatically. (We never had it as kids). But 2% is indeed wiser when we are talking needed calories.

    Yes! I forgot about oatmeal and beans! I can get some cheap chicken, peanut butter, eggs, bananas, sometimes they have clearance Greek yogurt (because it expires in a week).

    I'll tell you...I'm a very sad cook, so trying to make my own bread might be a stretch for me, but I can certainly try, right? I'll find out where they hide the active yeast. It's a good season to learn.

    Yeast packets (baking aisle....probably top shelf) aren't cheap when sold individually. You have to buy a jar ($5+) to get a good price.

    Maybe something more along the lines of biscuits.....or batter bread (uses baking powder & baking soda)
  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,372 Member
    You could check the dollar store for bread too. Or see if one of your store has a clearance section. Mine always has random bagels and rolls there for like $1 for 6 (plus cheese, deli meat, some prepared food and cut fruit and veggies at 50% off).
  • spacelump
    spacelump Posts: 233 Member
    I love ramen noodles (20 cents each!). I only use half the flavor pack and I add 1/3 bag of mixed frozen vegs. and some scrambled egg or chicken for protein.

    I secretly love Ramen too, but they always without fail constipate me to a place of total misery and regret. But! Pasta is a grand idea. Can pasta be healthy?

    Biscuits. That I can do. I'll wait until more moolah comes to experiment (and probably waste a ton of product) with baking.

  • lauries8888
    lauries8888 Posts: 70 Member
    "TeaBea wrote: »
    Yeast packets (baking aisle....probably top shelf) aren't cheap when sold individually. You have to buy a jar ($5+) to get a good price.

    Not in PA. The yeast (packets and jars) are in the refrigerator section.
  • acheben
    acheben Posts: 476 Member
    burns429 wrote: »
    This was going to be my advice. She's currently doing a "September Challenge" where she only spends $31/week on groceries.
  • lauries8888
    lauries8888 Posts: 70 Member
    spacelump wrote: »

    I secretly love Ramen too, but they always without fail constipate me to a place of total misery and regret. But! Pasta is a grand idea. Can pasta be healthy?

    Pasta is inexpensive and has potassium, iron and protein, all of which are essentials. Pair it with a red sauce (cheap bottled sauce, add spices) and it is very healthy as long as you don't need to restrict carbs for health reasons.
  • urloved33
    urloved33 Posts: 3,325 Member
    I love ramen noodles (20 cents each!). I only use half the flavor pack and I add 1/3 bag of mixed frozen vegs. and some scrambled egg or chicken for protein.

    ^^this^^
  • Ang108
    Ang108 Posts: 1,711 Member
    edited September 2015
    spacelump wrote: »
    Alright, you savvy MFP's. I have $30, 9 days til payday, and an empty fridge but for about a pound of chicken and bag of brown rice.

    Please share all your frugal meal suggestions for this broke little dieter trying to stay on the fed and healthy path.

    I intend to buy skim milk, bananas, some tuna, and eggs. What else might I add as filling staples for meals?

    Thank you all in advance!

    The cheapest meal that still fulfills nutritional requirements I have come up with:

    Boil rice
    boil a bag of mixed frozen vegetables
    add canned tuna to taste ( I use one can per meal, but it is still tasty with less, but making sure you still have some nutritional value from the tuna )
    put in the fridge

    scoop out a portion for each meal and either eat it with lime/lemon juice or a bit of mayonnaise as a salad
    or heat it up and add a tiny bit of cream, or sprinkle with some cheese
    You can also add fresh or dried herbs to the salad and the heated up version.
    I aim for at least half rice and half vegetables and often for more vegetables than rice.

    I make this often ( logged under " rice bowl " ) because I really like it. I also use canned chicken, or salmon ( which here in Mexico also come in standard tuna size cans and usually have between 87-100 calories ).
    I grow my own parsley and cilantro and add copious amount of either to either version to get some crunch, some freshness and vitamins. The visual effect is also nice.

    Also the same is also very delicious using any kind of beans ( black, kidney, pinto etc ) mixed with rice and vegetables ( makes an excellent complete protein ! ) with either tuna, or by itself furthermore adding chopped onion, tomato and cucumbers or whatever you like.


  • spacelump
    spacelump Posts: 233 Member
    The budget bytes challenge has some great ideas and easy recipes. Actually excited to try a few. +1

    Also, the rice bowl is a great idea! Balanced, inexpensive, can be eaten hot or cold. All over it. You guys are life savers. My simple self thought I was going to live off eggs and bananas and rice for over a week. Yay for real meals!
  • wrrly
    wrrly Posts: 26 Member
    I highly recommend this site: http://www.leannebrown.com/. Author, who is highly qualified, gives some good advice and good recipes for living on a tight budget.
  • Ninkyou
    Ninkyou Posts: 6,666 Member
    Use coupons.

    Coupons.com

    Combine said coupons with your grocery store's sales ad.