Macros for weightloss

Has anyone else done or heard of Katy Hearn's challenges? Basically they are 8 week programs of cardio / strength training and she has you watch and track your macros. However, I kind of feel like I'm over eating when trying to fit in my macro range? I also just find it difficult in general to get all of my levels where they are supposed to be, if I'm good on protein and carbs, I'm way under on my fats.

Replies

  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
    Without commenting on the why's and wherefore you need to try harder to make food choices that align with your goals.

    You have a low carbohydrate target for today, so don't eat grapes or a muffin. You undershoot fat and yet choose egg whites and lean tuna in water. Your macros don't suit using "light" or "lean" options.
  • ainarsraciks
    ainarsraciks Posts: 166 Member
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.
  • concordancia
    concordancia Posts: 5,320 Member
    You have set high fat, low carb macros, but you are eating high carb, low fat. If you want to achieve these macros, you need to choose different foods. No starches or fruits, if you are going to stay at or under your carb goal, but once you get rid of those, you should have room for veggies. Eat the whole egg, cooked in oil, have some nuts, use olive oil, vinegar and actual poppy seeds instead of light dressing...

    I'm sorry, two eggs, six tablespoons of egg white and a whole avocado? Is that any good or just an attempt to meet your macros?
  • Michael190lbs
    Michael190lbs Posts: 1,510 Member
    edited October 2015



    Don't worry about your carbs!!! Get your Fats and protein for the day then use calories for whats left over.

    Example 140 lbs goal weight on 1500 calories

    140 x .8 = 112 grams x 4 calories per gram = 448 calories is protein

    140 x .4 = 56 grams x 9 calories per gram = 504 calories is Fats

    So 952 calories you should get a day if your strength training and generally trying to improve muscle. If you have a goal of 1500 calories?

    1500 caloric goal - 952 = 548 remaining you can eat/ drink anything want with carbs, more fats and protein anything even alcohol..
  • red0801
    red0801 Posts: 283 Member
    I like using macros not as a "rule" but as guide. For me the most important thing is to listen to my body. If I'm hungry I increase my intake, if I feel stuffed...let it go. But use macros to keep track of vitamin/mineral intake so I'm not undernurished. Sometimes I feel stuffed because my body doesn't have the fuel it needs to process the protein & complex carbs I am forcing into it. The cool thing about macros is if you're eating nutrient dense food (i.e. unprocessed fruits, veggies, clean meats) you get more value delivered to your body per calorie, so you calorie count actually falls slightly. A simple suggestions may be to add unprocessed leafy & colorful vegetables. Spinach or kale salad with peppers/tomatoes & balsomic vinegarette (2-3 cups as a snack) in the late morning or late evening to help your body with antioxidants & food breakdown.
  • LolBroScience
    LolBroScience Posts: 4,537 Member
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.

    Sure, deficit is key to weight loss... but to call it a gimmick isn't accurate. Eat a very low protein diet with a severe deficit vs one with sufficient protein and watch what happens with lbm preservation.
  • ASKyle
    ASKyle Posts: 1,475 Member
    Calorie deficit for weight loss.

    Macros for what keeps you (personally) satisfied and full. I find fat more satiating than carbs, so that's what I focus on. I'd rather have whole eggs and cheese than a piece of toast, for instance.
  • Emily3907
    Emily3907 Posts: 1,461 Member
    red0801 wrote: »
    I like using macros not as a "rule" but as guide. For me the most important thing is to listen to my body.

    This. Macros are a guide for me to double check that I am staying balanced. I played with my daily goals and gave myself more carbs on the weekend than during the week, only because I noticed a trend there. Beyond that, it is just a gauge to make sure everything is appropriately balanced for the day and I may make a different food choice based on how my numbers are adding up for the day. I lean more towards the CICO thinking, mainly because it is just easier for me to manage.
  • melduf
    melduf Posts: 468 Member
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.

    It's not a gimmick, it's a tool at your disposal. I used to have horrible macros but within my calorie goal and my weightloss was difficult. I would feel hunger even though I had enough calories (not enough protein). You can have fried food and still be within your calorie goal, but your fat % is going to be all over the place.

    Personally, I eat 1550 calories per day and my macros are around 40% carbs, 30% protein, 30% fat. I have been following those goals for a year now (and working out 5-6 days a week) and I have lost 50 lbs.

    OP, find what works for you. It's about balance between feeling good (not suffering from hunger, having enough energy, etc.) and still losing weight.
  • extra_medium
    extra_medium Posts: 1,525 Member
    melduf wrote: »
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.

    It's not a gimmick, it's a tool at your disposal. I used to have horrible macros but within my calorie goal and my weightloss was difficult. I would feel hunger even though I had enough calories (not enough protein). You can have fried food and still be within your calorie goal, but your fat % is going to be all over the place.

    Personally, I eat 1550 calories per day and my macros are around 40% carbs, 30% protein, 30% fat. I have been following those goals for a year now (and working out 5-6 days a week) and I have lost 50 lbs.

    OP, find what works for you. It's about balance between feeling good (not suffering from hunger, having enough energy, etc.) and still losing weight.

    I'm pretty sure they are referring to programs in which all you do is count macros and ignore calories in order to lose weight as gimmicks. Not that you shouldn't pay attention to macros at all.
  • ohmscheeks
    ohmscheeks Posts: 840 Member
    The only way I ever hit macros is to sit down and plan what I will eat in advance (at least 2/3 of the grams)
  • LolBroScience
    LolBroScience Posts: 4,537 Member
    edited October 2015
    melduf wrote: »
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.

    It's not a gimmick, it's a tool at your disposal. I used to have horrible macros but within my calorie goal and my weightloss was difficult. I would feel hunger even though I had enough calories (not enough protein). You can have fried food and still be within your calorie goal, but your fat % is going to be all over the place.

    Personally, I eat 1550 calories per day and my macros are around 40% carbs, 30% protein, 30% fat. I have been following those goals for a year now (and working out 5-6 days a week) and I have lost 50 lbs.

    OP, find what works for you. It's about balance between feeling good (not suffering from hunger, having enough energy, etc.) and still losing weight.

    I'm pretty sure they are referring to programs in which all you do is count macros and ignore calories in order to lose weight as gimmicks. Not that you shouldn't pay attention to macros at all.

    What programs are those? Makes no sense btw... You're setting up your macros based upon a particular TDEE, and what you're trying to accomplish - Fat Loss, Gain, Recomp, etc. Your macros make up that particular caloric allotment of that calorie goal... so if you're hitting macros, you're hitting that caloric goal as well.
  • DaddieCat
    DaddieCat Posts: 3,646 Member
    melduf wrote: »
    Counting macros for weight loss is a gimmick. You not gonna benefit it unless you are very low body fat % already and are preparing for fitness competition on stage or something. Calorie deficit is the key.

    It's not a gimmick, it's a tool at your disposal. I used to have horrible macros but within my calorie goal and my weightloss was difficult. I would feel hunger even though I had enough calories (not enough protein). You can have fried food and still be within your calorie goal, but your fat % is going to be all over the place.

    Personally, I eat 1550 calories per day and my macros are around 40% carbs, 30% protein, 30% fat. I have been following those goals for a year now (and working out 5-6 days a week) and I have lost 50 lbs.

    OP, find what works for you. It's about balance between feeling good (not suffering from hunger, having enough energy, etc.) and still losing weight.

    I'm pretty sure they are referring to programs in which all you do is count macros and ignore calories in order to lose weight as gimmicks. Not that you shouldn't pay attention to macros at all.

    What programs are those? Makes no sense btw... You're setting up your macros based upon a particular TDEE, and what you're trying to accomplish - Fat Loss, Gain, Recomp, etc. Your macros make up that particular caloric allotment of that calorie goal... so if you're hitting macros, you're hitting that caloric goal as well.

    This^ a well planned macro ratio will add up to your calorie goal, no matter what percentages you use. It's pretty basic math. I like to think of CICO as calorie counting and Macro counting as a "more advanced" version of CICO... the natural next step of someone who has goals beyond simple weight loss. While macro counting will work just as well, and protein definitely helps preserve lean mass, not everyone wants to take that step. I think of it like the difference between using a store bought product (buying a computer) and taking a more active role in the creation of said product (building a computer to your own specs from your own parts sourced yourself)... they are both similar and almost the same but one is just a little more demanding of time and effort and usually related to a more specific goal. I know it's not the best analogy, but it works for my way of thinking.