EMS

Anyone having success losing weight that works in EMS? I am a paramedic and find it incredibly hard to follow most advice I get due to the lifestyle.

Replies

  • Lovee_Dove7
    Lovee_Dove7 Posts: 742 Member
    Do you weigh and log your food?
    On your days off, do you exercise?
  • RodaRose
    RodaRose Posts: 9,562 Member
    Can you be more specific about the challenges of your work as they relate to food?
  • queenliz99
    queenliz99 Posts: 15,317 Member
    What do you normally eat? Why not just eat less of it. Lots of very busy people still manage to lose weight.
  • FatFreeFrolicking
    FatFreeFrolicking Posts: 4,252 Member
    I have a good friend who is an EMT and she preps all her meals/snacks in advance before each shift. She's been able to lose 50 pounds.
  • zoeysasha37
    zoeysasha37 Posts: 7,089 Member
    Honestly, if you just ate the foods you regularly ate but within the correct portions then you wouldn't have to worry about it.
    Weight loss comes from a calorie deficit. In order to lose weight, you must eat less then you burn. So you can still enjoy All the regular foods that you like, but instead eat them within your calorie goal . as long as you eat at a deficit you'll be able to lose weight. your job has nothing to do with it, other then it might be a pain in the butt carrying a lunch box around with you in the ambulance so you have your pre weighed and pre portioned foods with you. Get yourself a food scale, weigh your foods, log them here and carry the foods in a bag with you to work. Eat them when you want to eat.
  • saxman426
    saxman426 Posts: 14 Member
    Paramedic here, in a city with high call volume. I have lost a total of 45 pounds by simply eating healthier, drinking water instead of soft drinks, and working out on days off and after my shifts. Ultimately it is possible if you put your mind to it. It is a hard job to stay fit, but you got this!

    Lou
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    saxman426 wrote: »
    Paramedic here, in a city with high call volume. I have lost a total of 45 pounds by simply eating healthier, drinking water instead of soft drinks, and working out on days off and after my shifts. Ultimately it is possible if you put your mind to it. It is a hard job to stay fit, but you got this!

    Lou

    I am not EMS, but have worked 12 hour night shifts (inner city hospital). Different job now, but a lot of different stressors instead. This all resonates with me. It is hard work, but ultimately you can do it. I find that when I work out regularly I am safer with my patients and for them.

    As a front line worker, I would think that the need to stay in better shape is so important given the volatile nature of some of the situations in which you enter. Thank you for what you do, by the way (both of you).

    Maybe make a list of the reasons you want to make changes, and keep a copy of that with you. As thorsmom said, weight loss is about consuming less. I have to prep my lunches the night before if I am on early shift, or I end up eating in the cafeteria and making poor choices. As for exercise, when I am tired and stressed, I tell myself that I will go for 15 minutes and then reevaluate. Usually by the time I get in the first 15, I'm good to continue (feel silly stopping at that point, plus the energy is flowing). Regular exercise can improve sleep as well as the physical advantages, which can improve mental clarity.

    Be consistent, be persistent, and be patient. Set realistic goals. These are the things that help me. You need to find what works for you.
  • malibu927
    malibu927 Posts: 17,565 Member
    I know a few EMTs/paramedics who have lost weight. It shouldn't be any different as it only matters how much you eat.
  • Gentle7
    Gentle7 Posts: 6 Member
    Oh, I feel your pain. I work 12hour nights but not as a paramedic. And yes, this is tough. I find myself grabbing whatever I can find too. But, I have decided to take 1 day at a time. Feel free to friend me. You will see that I too struggle. I have decided to simply keep trying. As such, rather than swim and go to work tonight, only to get sick due to it being soooo cold, I walked the dog. I felt that it was a vigorous walk. I don't know that my dog agreed, but hey, I gotta keep trying. Eventually, things will work themselves out. "Grow not weary in well doing, for you will reap a harvest if you faint not." Hugs my friend.
  • JCarrier1028
    JCarrier1028 Posts: 11 Member
    I plan on prepping and packing meals when I begin 24 hour shifts again here soon (worked 2 years on 24's but have been on day truck for the last 6 months) as I do think that will help. The biggest problems I have are:
    1. Not being able to eat regularly (sometimes I may only have time for 2 meals on a 24 hour shift and as a result tend to overdo it when I do get to eat).
    2. Having to grab whatever unhealthy food is available (hopefully this is where prepping will come in handy).
    3. Poor sleep habits which make me never want to exercise.

    I understand what I need to do for the most part it's just implementing the changes and trying to adjust everything to better fit my schedule and lifestyle.

    Thank you for the suggestions. Keep them coming.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    trptplyr17 wrote: »
    I plan on prepping and packing meals when I begin 24 hour shifts again here soon (worked 2 years on 24's but have been on day truck for the last 6 months) as I do think that will help. The biggest problems I have are:
    1. Not being able to eat regularly (sometimes I may only have time for 2 meals on a 24 hour shift and as a result tend to overdo it when I do get to eat).
    2. Having to grab whatever unhealthy food is available (hopefully this is where prepping will come in handy).
    3. Poor sleep habits which make me never want to exercise.

    I understand what I need to do for the most part it's just implementing the changes and trying to adjust everything to better fit my schedule and lifestyle.

    Thank you for the suggestions. Keep them coming.

    It is challenging, certainly. Make small changes that help get you there. This week, track. That's it, just track what you eat, every day. Next weekend, look at where you are and ask what can you change. So next week, bring some small snacks that will fit with your goals so you are less likely to go into 'eating whatever I can' mode. A premeasure serving of nuts, protein bars, veggies, cups of applesauce. Then at the end of the week, reevaluate again. Focus on your diet for now, and then once you are comfortable with those changes and settled into them, add in some exercise. Walk 15 minutes/day. Repeat. Slow steady changes. You have time. It's going to pass anyway...
  • JCarrier1028
    JCarrier1028 Posts: 11 Member
    Thanks nutmegoreo. Maybe taking it slower will help instead of just diving in head first
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,532 Member
    trptplyr17 wrote: »
    Thanks nutmegoreo. Maybe taking it slower will help instead of just diving in head first

    It might seem less overwhelming that way. You can do it!
  • kristirobinson1
    kristirobinson1 Posts: 48 Member
    I'm an Emt and I've lost 30 lbs. I bring my lunch and pre log for the day. I bring my lunchbox with me on the ambulance if we get a call incase we have to post or we don't make it back by lunch. If I do eat out I try and find the nutritional information for restaurants before I order and find something that fits in my calories. Pre logging works the best though!