How I Learned To Like Cardio

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  • coreyreichle
    coreyreichle Posts: 1,031 Member
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    You know "cardio bunny" is a derogatory term?

    It's cool. We're taking it back :)
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
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    You know "cardio bunny" is a derogatory term?

    Really? I hear it used as a "cutesy" way to compliment a woman who works out, mostly from woman to woman. Different cultural uses I guess.
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,392 Member
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    I never saw "cardio bunny" as being a bad thing.

    It's actually surprising to me that some people spend so much time in a gym or working out and do no cardio. Both strength and cardio can compliment one another, and a lot of people avoid the one they like the least.

    Back when I didn't have much choice in doing cardio, I didn't enjoy it as much. And now certain types I like more than others. But for me it's just a different challenge vs strength type training.
  • jdhcm2006
    jdhcm2006 Posts: 2,254 Member
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    I have never heard the term cardio bunny. Never.
    kziwchalta43.jpg
  • LKArgh
    LKArgh Posts: 5,179 Member
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    I want to ask where the derogatory term comes from, becuase I am clearly oblivious and only realized the title of the thread was bad when someone pointed it out. Is it a new thing? or maybe at the ripe old age of 31, I'm over the hill and unable to keep up with trends.

    I seriously doubt that anyone seriously into fitness and not having a serious inferiority complex would come up with a way to insult others for their preferance in exercise, so my guesses are:

    From people with no stamina, unable to run or use a bike for more than 10 minutes, who consider this as too hard work and the thought that someome might actually enjoy it has never crossed their mind?
    From old school lifters on steroids?
    From out of shape women jealous of slimmer women who could run for an hour withour wheezing and feeling like dying?
  • PinkyPan1
    PinkyPan1 Posts: 3,018 Member
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    I am a "cardio Junkie" all because of Leslie Sansone too! I could not even hang with her for a quarter mile when I started. Now I power walk outdoors 7 miles, "power golf" and do her videos when the weather is not cooperating. Today I did 5 Leslie miles. Leslie not only helped me shed 22 pounds but also gave me back my life after a heart attack and back surgeries. I love the cardio high too!
  • Lord007
    Lord007 Posts: 338 Member
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    RealityFades, I started out similarly. I started getting up before the Universe and walking 20 minutes on the treadmill 3 times a week. Distance was less important than just being active. My thought process was by going that early, pretty much straight out of bed, I would be halfway done (or more) before I started to wake up and realize what I was doing. Eventually, I added running for a minute, walking for 4, and gradually working in more running. Now I regularly run 2+ miles 3x weekly and I do a number of 5k races through out the year.
    I agree with your premise whole heartedly. :)

    As to everyone else on the post, I'm really surprised at the focus given to the semantics of her subject title instead of the content and great intentions of the message.
  • mattyc772014
    mattyc772014 Posts: 3,543 Member
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    This made my day. :)
  • Colorscheme
    Colorscheme Posts: 1,179 Member
    edited January 2016
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    Lord007 wrote: »
    RealityFades, I started out similarly. I started getting up before the Universe and walking 20 minutes on the treadmill 3 times a week. Distance was less important than just being active. My thought process was by going that early, pretty much straight out of bed, I would be halfway done (or more) before I started to wake up and realize what I was doing. Eventually, I added running for a minute, walking for 4, and gradually working in more running. Now I regularly run 2+ miles 3x weekly and I do a number of 5k races through out the year.
    I agree with your premise whole heartedly. :)

    As to everyone else on the post, I'm really surprised at the focus given to the semantics of her subject title instead of the content and great intentions of the message.

    Well thanks. I was trying to be motivating and let people know that you just don't get up and decide to run one day. Running takes a lot of stamina and you need to take it slow and build up endurance.

    If you watch My 600 Lb Life, sometimes you'll see the people starting out by walking slowly and then as they lose the weight, their fitness level improves and they're able to walk faster and further than they previously could. Or you'll see them exercise by simply lifting and lowering their arms without any weight. Whatever gets you moving is great and that slow and steady wins the race.

    My mom is morbidly obese and I wish she would at least try to move a little, but she's a bit like the infamous Penny and always makes excuses instead of doing what is better for her.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
    edited January 2016
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    I was not 600 lb, but when I started, walking fast (at least what felt fast at the time, more like a wadde to me now) for more than 5 minutes straight was an ordeal. Even when I developed enough stamina to consider running, c25k was too advanced for me. I did this plan instead to work up to it.
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,573 Member
    edited January 2016
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    Ugh. If I never run again I'd be fine with that.

    ETA: But I'm grateful I'm able to if necessary :)
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,392 Member
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    arditarose wrote: »
    Ugh. If I never run again I'd be fine with that.

    ETA: But I'm grateful I'm able to if necessary :)

    A good cardio base will also help your lifting. Especially rest time between sets. I'll admit there was a time when I hated most cardio, but we were forced to do it. Now I can actually enjoy it, and clicking off a few quick miles on the bike after my heart rate was already up gets the endorphins flowing way better than any type of lifting ever did.

    Just release your inner cardio bunny! :) And as a bonus, you can cut quicker when you decide to do it.
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,573 Member
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    robertw486 wrote: »
    arditarose wrote: »
    Ugh. If I never run again I'd be fine with that.

    ETA: But I'm grateful I'm able to if necessary :)

    A good cardio base will also help your lifting. Especially rest time between sets. I'll admit there was a time when I hated most cardio, but we were forced to do it. Now I can actually enjoy it, and clicking off a few quick miles on the bike after my heart rate was already up gets the endorphins flowing way better than any type of lifting ever did.

    Just release your inner cardio bunny! :) And as a bonus, you can cut quicker when you decide to do it.

    You can tell me that all you want. But until I decide to do it or find something I like, it's not happening. I'll probably do it when I cut though because I'm gonna be all intense, I know.
  • AdrianChr92
    AdrianChr92 Posts: 567 Member
    edited January 2016
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    This thread is triggering. It gave me PTSD
  • robertw486
    robertw486 Posts: 2,392 Member
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    arditarose wrote: »
    robertw486 wrote: »
    arditarose wrote: »
    Ugh. If I never run again I'd be fine with that.

    ETA: But I'm grateful I'm able to if necessary :)

    A good cardio base will also help your lifting. Especially rest time between sets. I'll admit there was a time when I hated most cardio, but we were forced to do it. Now I can actually enjoy it, and clicking off a few quick miles on the bike after my heart rate was already up gets the endorphins flowing way better than any type of lifting ever did.

    Just release your inner cardio bunny! :) And as a bonus, you can cut quicker when you decide to do it.

    You can tell me that all you want. But until I decide to do it or find something I like, it's not happening. I'll probably do it when I cut though because I'm gonna be all intense, I know.

    For the most part, I'm one of the people that can't stand easy pace flog on forever cardio. But if you get creative there are plenty of weight circuits and such that combine both. If you keep your heart rate up you can easily maintain and even build muscle doing cardio type workout. A lot of people that preach "lift heavy" will tell you that can't happen. And having done both, I completely disagree.

    You won't want to cut slow, and you'll wish you had already earned that cardio bunny T shirt!
  • GlitzyKismet
    GlitzyKismet Posts: 9 Member
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    I did this plan instead to work up to it.

    Thanks for posting the plan. I'm curious to know if, after completing that, you were ready to start right in with the C25K program. Did you take more than one week for each of the levels in this plan? I've tried to use the C25K app in the past, but by the time I got to about week 4 or so, I was struggling with it.

  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,330 Member
    edited January 2016
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    I did this plan instead to work up to it.

    Thanks for posting the plan. I'm curious to know if, after completing that, you were ready to start right in with the C25K program. Did you take more than one week for each of the levels in this plan? I've tried to use the C25K app in the past, but by the time I got to about week 4 or so, I was struggling with it.

    It only took me one week at each level. This is meant to condition your muscles and nervous system to the running process, not exactly meant to make anyone a runner. The running part is only 15 seconds at the hardest, so I did not feel the need to repeat weeks.

    I did not do c25k to be honest. After I finished conditioning I did this plan (this first part), and after I finished that I did this one. The trick is to experiment with speed and slow down enough to be able to finish the running intervals feeling like you could go one more minute. If you are pushing through the last few seconds you are going too fast. Focus on the time you are able to continuously run for now, speed comes later. I actually ran slower than I was able to walk for the first few months. Starting running as an obese person is different and quite a few modifications need to be made. A plan that may be okay for an overweight person may be too hard for someone who is obese.