5K to 10K advise

Hi all runners out there, I'm looking for some advise.... I can currently run a 5K (fairly slowly at about 32 mins but I can run it). I have signed up for a 10k in 10 weeks time and I'm wondering how best to train for this as I want to improve my pace too.
I've been looking at programs online and all of them seem to involve 5 - 6 days of training per week, I don't have this amount of time, I work full time and have a young toddler, I can run 3 times a week maximum (I usually run twice a week with 1 gym session).
Does anyone have a program that can help me? I hope I haven't bitten off more than I can realistically chew!!
Thank you all in advance!

Replies

  • Trump2016
    Trump2016 Posts: 80 Member
    edited January 2016
    Long distance runner here.

    1. Use the 10 weeks to develop explosive strength - implement anaerobic training. Run the stairs for 2 of 3 weekly hours. Slowly work yourself into skipping steps on the way up for added difficulty. Use the remaining 1 of 3 hours of dedication for regular running and try to break some sort of record each time.

    2. Become overall lighter for the 10k. Caloric deficit on days you don't train.
  • Clarewho
    Clarewho Posts: 494 Member
    I was probably in the same position as you last year and I'm now running over 10k having never run more than 4 times per week. I didn't follow a program, I started at 3x5k runs pw then gradually the weekend run became longer so I could run for about 45/50 mins. Then I entered a 10k and wanted to run the entire thing so I increased my weekend run time by including 2x1 minute walking ('recovery'!) periods during my weekend run, allowing me to stay out slightly longer. I kept the weekday runs at 5k at first, plus sometimes I'd run on the treadmill at the gym but only ever for probably 25 mins max because mentally I struggled with the treadmill.

    Over time I increased the time between the 'walks', eventually it was just 1x1min walk half way through the run. Then one day I was having such a lovely run that I didn't get round to stopping until about 55 minutes in, and that was when I realised I could definitely do a 10k without stopping which proved to be the case a couple of days later. That was a great day for me :smiley:

    I'd say you need to run at least 3 times pw to make it easier on yourself. You may have to drop the gym until you can build up your mileage. One clear day between runs is ideal, or two after the longer runs. That's better for your muscle memory I think.

    You can definitely do this in 10 weeks, I'm not sure where you are but where I live we are getting longer daylight hours now and the weather can only get better so again, that will help. You've got this :wink:

  • Trishfitz78
    Trishfitz78 Posts: 69 Member
    thank you both so much!
    Glad to see I'm not the only one that struggles with treadmill mentally!!
  • rockinrodders1
    rockinrodders1 Posts: 4 Member
    It's not a particularly scientific approach but I recently increased my maximum regular run from 5k to 10k by just trying to run a bit further every time I go out. So Day 1 I'd run the 5k, then Day 3 (after rest day) I'd run the 5k plus maybe add one extra street (running around town) to add 200-300m to the run. Next day add a bit more.

    I tend to map out my planned routes in advance to get the approximate mileage and then adjust it as required when I'm out.

    To improve my times I build in some hill repeats into my training once a week or maybe add some hilly terrain to my normal runs (which is easy as it's very hilly where I live). When you get used to running up hills it is much easier and quicker when you go back to the flat.
  • Clarewho
    Clarewho Posts: 494 Member
    @rockinrodders1 that's true about the hills, they are meant to increase your leg power so flat running becomes easier. I live in a very very flat place, literally the only uphill I can do is to incorporate a couple of railway bridges in my run :disappointed:
  • Josh_lol
    Josh_lol Posts: 317 Member
    edited January 2016
    I have a similar 5k time to you (about 29 mins). I run 5k probably 3 times a week and I tend to do a 10k maybe once a fortnight. Whenever I do a 10k, I tend to have little 1 minute periods every 5 mins or so where I slow down by maybe 10% and it helps me recover from any tiredness I might be feeling.
  • 1992fx3
    1992fx3 Posts: 35 Member
    I used the 5K to 10K program in the RunDouble app; 3 days a week training.
  • Trishfitz78
    Trishfitz78 Posts: 69 Member
    edited January 2016
    thanks again everyone! great tips!
  • PoundChaser2
    PoundChaser2 Posts: 241 Member
    Trish
    Don't worry about your speed that will come once you have put more time/distance on your feet. Currently your doing a 10ish min mile this is good but, if you try to increase your speed before your legs get use to pounding the longer distances your going to bring yourself to a running halt most injuries will occur during the build up phase. Make sure you take easy days every other day or every 2 days, this depends on age,fitness level and life. Hills are good for building leg power but, they shouldn't be done everyday you will burn your quads out you need to have a rounded program not to much flats,hills,speed a good mix. Want a decent race research/visit if you can the course you will be running and train accordingly. Not sure if you can see my photo but I ran a 15 mile off road mountain race 3.5 mile hill, this race pretty much ruined my knee even though I was running marathon distances at the time I wasn't prepped for the massive up & down hills and changing tracks on the course. This was the 1st time I never visited my race course.

    Look up beginners 10k programs through runnersworld.com

    Have fun this is the part I forgot about !
  • burns429
    burns429 Posts: 104 Member
    edited January 2016
    Here are two links to two training programs provided to 1/4 marathon participants (6.55 miles vs the 10k's 6.2 miles). I used the beginners one last year when I was training for a 1/4 marathon. They're longer than 10 weeks but since you've already established the 5k, you can probably skip to week 7.

    http://www.capitalcityhalfmarathon.com/pdf/training_quarter_beg.pdf

    http://www.capitalcityhalfmarathon.com/pdf/training_quarter_int.pdf


    ETA: This is the training for a 1/2 and will get you up to 6 miles in 7 weeks.

    http://www.capitalcityhalfmarathon.com/pdf/training_half_beg.pdf
  • Trishfitz78
    Trishfitz78 Posts: 69 Member
    wow. always amazes me how helpful people are in here! thank you all again!
  • granturismo
    granturismo Posts: 233 Member
    10 months after finishing c25k, I signed up for a 10k.
    I was running 5k three times a week. To increase my distance I ran 5K or 6K twice a week and I added an additional 1K or so, to my third run. After 5 weeks I ran 12K for the very first time.

    Mentally I found increasing from 5K to 6K the most difficult as I was so conditioned to stopping at 5K.
    You have 10 weeks, I'd concentrate on running the distance rather than trying to improve your pace as well.
  • hoyalawya2003
    hoyalawya2003 Posts: 631 Member
    You've already gotten some great advice. I just thought I'd add that you are way faster than me (ran a 5K in 39 min last weekend) and I am planning on a 15k this Saturday. So you can definitely do it!
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,412 Member
    edited January 2016
    Trump2016 wrote: »
    Long distance runner here.

    1. Use the 10 weeks to develop explosive strength - implement anaerobic training. Run the stairs for 2 of 3 weekly hours. Slowly work yourself into skipping steps on the way up for added difficulty. Use the remaining 1 of 3 hours of dedication for regular running and try to break some sort of record each time.

    2. Become overall lighter for the 10k. Caloric deficit on days you don't train.

    I disagree with the first approach and we don't have enough information to know the OP needs to lose weight or not.

    Going from just being able to run 5K to 2 to 3 hours of running stairs, combined with 1 to 3 hours of trying to "break records" is just inviting injury. That approach may be fine for someone who has been running a long time and who's body has adapted to the activity, but not for someone who's wondering if she could it.

    OP, you certainly can do it and 10 weeks in plenty of time to get from 5K to 10K, and you can do it running 3 days per week. You should be focusing on running at a conversational pace, which is a pace that is slow enough so that you could still carry on a conversation or sing a song while you run. The adaptations your body makes to the stresses of running occur at this level of effort. Running faster and harder won't make your body adapt any quicker but will increase you risk of injury. By running slower you can run farther and spend more time on your feet. It seems counter intuitive but by running slower and longer during training is how you get to where you can run faster in races.

    The only record I would try to break before your race is your total weekly miles, and even then, you want to do it slowly.

    Build up miles slowly to allow your body time to adapt without incurring overuse injuries. 10% increase per week is a common guideline. You don't mention how many miles per week you run, but let's say you're currently running 2 miles, 2 miles and 3 miles on your three weekly runs. The following weeks might look like this:

    W1: 2.5 + 2 + 3 = 7.5
    W2: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3 = 8
    W3 2.5 + 2 + 4 = 8.5
    W4 2.5 + 2.5 + 4 = 9
    W5 3 + 2.5 + 4.5 = 10

    and so on, gradually increasing your miles throughout the week. Get your long run to 6 or 7 miles. Even if you don't, though, the excitement of race day will get you across the finish line. You've got a great start. The key now is to increase your miles and stay injury free so you can keep training.
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,412 Member
    One other point...the week before your race, cut back on the miles to give your body some rest and recovery. Starting the weekend prior to the race, cut your miles by half.
  • RunnersLament
    RunnersLament Posts: 140 Member
    Hi all runners out there, I'm looking for some advise.... I can currently run a 5K (fairly slowly at about 32 mins but I can run it). I have signed up for a 10k in 10 weeks time and I'm wondering how best to train for this as I want to improve my pace too.
    I've been looking at programs online and all of them seem to involve 5 - 6 days of training per week, I don't have this amount of time, I work full time and have a young toddler, I can run 3 times a week maximum (I usually run twice a week with 1 gym session).
    Does anyone have a program that can help me? I hope I haven't bitten off more than I can realistically chew!!
    Thank you all in advance!

    Great Goal, Great amibition... If I didn't have an Achilles injury right now I'd join you as I love to run 10 K races. I think that you have selected an excellent goal for yourself and it is very doable.

    First off 32 minutes is not slow... that is actually about average with most women running in the 11:00-12:00 mile range for a 5K. There will always be faster, but hey that's why there are the Olympics right? If everyone ran the same pace what would be the point?

    So... In 10 weeks you want to increase your distance by 5 Km and you would also like to get faster?

    1. Continue to run your three runs per week, saving one run as a Long Slow Distance run. Long Slow Distance runs are run at a slower pace and are designed to build your endurance. Best description of the pace is Conversational and at a pace you'd be comfortable with if I asked you to do it over again. With your Long Slow Distance, I'd add a KM every other week starting at 5Km. BY week 10, you'll be running 10K.
    2. Your other two runs per week, should be shorter but more intensive runs... it can be a combination of Hills, Intervals, Tempo runs etc, but I wouldn't exceed 30 minutes of running in either of those runs.
    3. Consider body weight exercises/strength training on your alternate days. As runners, we do ourselves a great disservice by focusing strictly on our running. If we work on building a stronger body as a whole, our speed improves greatly as does our resistance to injury and our overall health. For maximum results in the next 10 weeks, I'd suggest you focus on core strength on an almost daily basis... even if its only a 15-20 minute core workout, your body will thank you and your pace will improve. Think planks, crunches, squats, lunges, calf raises, push ups, burpees etc. Most of these can be done anywhere (and can also involve your child) and require no special equipment (just you, the floor and 15-20 minutes per workout)

    Full disclaimer: I also work part-time as a coach for one of the running chains here in Canada (no names mentioned)

    If you have any questions, feel free to add me.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,206 Member
    Trump2016 wrote: »
    Long distance runner here.

    1. Use the 10 weeks to develop explosive strength - implement anaerobic training. Run the stairs for 2 of 3 weekly hours. Slowly work yourself into skipping steps on the way up for added difficulty. Use the remaining 1 of 3 hours of dedication for regular running and try to break some sort of record each time.

    2. Become overall lighter for the 10k. Caloric deficit on days you don't train.

    Unorthodox to say the least.......the OP is working her way up to a 10K not trying to PR.....I agree with the previous poster, this is a recipe for an injury.

    I 'd agree with RunnersLament's approach (especially the advice on cross training.....it becomes more important as your distances get longer)


  • samthepanda
    samthepanda Posts: 569 Member
    Lots of good advice here. Like you I have small kids and its hard to get out more than twice a week, and I do a gym session too. My progress has been slow but I have got down from 32/3 min 5k to just under 29. I had done some on my own, but still did several walk sections but then I joined a club at my gym. I found it really helped running with others and (accompanied by an ex army pt instructor who did a lot of shouting towards the end) i did a 10k in 59 mins. The group kind of petered out when the weather turned, but I have continued to run with one of the guys, but we have just been doing a steady 5k each week not aiming to speed up. To be honest I'm proud we've got out there most weeks. We've both sighed up for the 10k again in August.
    Add me as a friend if you want. RunnersLament - tips are very welcome.
    Weird to think I hated running for years and would do anything to avoid it!
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    ^^ 7lenny7 ^^ nailed it. No beginning runner should be doing any kind of speed work until they develop the base needed to avoid injury. That only happens with slow, steady runs. Going from 3 to 6 miles in 10 weeks is doable for sure.

    Just remember to take it slow.

    Good luck.
  • mbaker566
    mbaker566 Posts: 11,234 Member
    i agree with @dewd2 and @7lenny7