completely frustrated - different results, same effort

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Replies

  • MommyL2015
    MommyL2015 Posts: 1,411 Member
    edited February 2016
    Packaged food weights can be wrong. My bread that I buy says it's 70 calories per 26g slice. Most slices, I've discovered, at least for this particular brand, are more around 32-33g. It's not a lot, but it's still a difference, so I log 32g not 27. I usually round up, so I'd put 35g. If you don't eat a ton of packaged stuff every day, it probably isn't too much of a difference but there's another place where calories could be off.
    It's so easy to comment what you want without thinking through my real question, which is why is it different when I'm doing all the same things?

    Your question has been answered, numerous times. You are not doing all the same things, because that cup of whatever you measured out in the past, might not have the same amount of calories as the cup you measured out today or will measure out next week or measured out 100 times before. There could be a huge difference in calories, so you have no idea whether what you are doing is the same or not. When you make a recipe, are you absolutely 100% sure you are adding the exact same ingredients in the exact same portions every single time? No, you're not, so you're not eating the same recipe every time.

    No one is being snarky, no one is being aggressive or mean, just factual. Blunt, yes, but not mean. You're getting way too defensive. There's only one thing on this green Earth that can cause fat gain or loss, and that is a calorie. Things can vary within your body, but through trial and error, you can lock in on that magic balance of calories in<calories out that will allow you to start losing again. If you feel your calories are low enough that you don't want to reduce them any more and you are absolutely insisting that your measurements are accurate, try walking an extra 20 or 30 minutes a day.

    At the end of the day, it's your plan, your body, your choice, but you've been given appropriate information and advice.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,701 Member
    terar21 wrote: »
    Because I don't think this has been said...

    It would be one thing if you preferred to estimate and eyeball. But if you are taking out the measuring cups and teaspoons/tablespoons, it takes no more effort to weigh things. It's actually easier and takes up less dishes. pouring milk into a measuring cup then pouring it into a bowl seems useless when I could just put a bowl on a scale and pour milk directly in.

    Just saying.

    Well said. I used to use cups and agree that a digital food scale is much easier, let alone accurate.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    dubird wrote: »
    I've said this before and this isn't a dig at you OP but what is with the US obsession with measuring all of the things in cups!? I will always find it baffling. I don't know how one measures a cashew with a teaspoon/tablespoon. Did you eat like, 2 cashews? Because I'd get only the one in my teaspoon measure (which I use for oils usually), no more would fit.

    Because that's how almost all our recipes are measured out. Very few will actually give ounces and grams of things, with the exception of some baking recipes. So that's pretty much what we default to when someone says "measure what you're eating". For stuff like nuts, we tend to count the number we eat, which is just as inaccurate as using cups and spoons as each nut can weigh slightly differently.

    One of the first things I had to do when I moved here was to buy a set of measuring cups. And then when I sent a recipe to my mum, she immediately emailed me back asking, "what the heck is a 'stick' of butter".

    Cups are great for liquids, but you will have to prise my scales from my cold, dead hands.

    Don't get me wrong, I have used recipes with cups and own a set of measuring cups but thought that's where it ended, for measuring flour or similar (although a cup or stick of butter always threw me). Seeing that it's also on packaging blows my mind though, knowingly putting something on there that is totally inaccurate is less than helpful. And then transferring that inaccurate logic to things like veggies and chicken, just, baffling.
  • ashliedelgado
    ashliedelgado Posts: 815 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    No - you are wrong - a scale is not the issue. If it was the issue, I would not have lost weight last year. Using a scale is a thoughtless pat answer on these boards - which is why I say that.

    I lost all my weight last year without a scale, by measuring. I am doing exactly the same thing now. That is the issue I want help with - not some mindless MFP mantra of 'buy a scale'.

    I lost quite well for the first six months by eye balling and using measuring cups. And then I stopped losing. And I bought a scale. And started losing again.

  • ashliedelgado
    ashliedelgado Posts: 815 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    One other difference I just realized - I'm been exercising betw. 1-3 pm, instead of around 7 am. Could that make a difference? That you silpeanut for the ideas. It's nice to at least hear that someone else has replicated effort with a different result. I weigh but I also take body measurements, because sometimes I will lose inches instead of pounds; I have changed size slightly, but nothing to be impressed/excited by. i believe my biggest loss is my hips - 1 inch. in 5 weeks...

    Not as far as weightloss.

    HOWEVER - I do find that when I work out in the morning, I make better food choices throughout the day, which result in staying closer to goals. That may be the case for you.
  • ClosetBayesian
    ClosetBayesian Posts: 836 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    No - you are wrong - a scale is not the issue. If it was the issue, I would not have lost weight last year. Using a scale is a thoughtless pat answer on these boards - which is why I say that.

    I lost all my weight last year without a scale, by measuring. I am doing exactly the same thing now. That is the issue I want help with - not some mindless MFP mantra of 'buy a scale'.

    I lost quite well for the first six months by eye balling and using measuring cups. And then I stopped losing. And I bought a scale. And started losing again.

    Same here.
  • zackwithrow7
    zackwithrow7 Posts: 1 Member
    Your estimated TDEE (Calories you spend per day - BMR + Activity) is 1900 calories per day. I would aim for ~10% deficit and eat 1600 - 1700 calories per day and increase your activity levels. Your estimated BMR (calories needed to keep you alive if completely still) is 1457. If you eat less then that you are fighting hunger chemicals much stronger than willpower.
  • brb_2013
    brb_2013 Posts: 1,197 Member
    I too am completely frustrated. I am now on Day 89 of this program and have simply maintained my current weight. I am always under my 1200 calories and have been working out 3 times/week. I had gone down 3 pounds a few weeks ago but only because I had the flu and was not eating - period. Of course, once I went back those 3 pounds came right back. I'm 57 and people tell me my metabolism is now slow to stop. I don't have much to lose - 10 lbs to make my clothes fit. However, I don't know what I'm doing wrong.

    My suggestions:
    Your deficit is way too high for how little you need to lose. Adjust your thinking. YOU won't lose 10lbs in 5 weeks. Set yourself to 1/2lb per week instead of 2. This will increase the calories you eat per day, and give your body more of what it needs. Weight loss cannot happen by force, so if a current method isn't working open your mind to changing it.

    I never lost a single pound eating 1200 calories per day. I upped to 1400 and that was the only time I was successful- same exercise (just walking). I believe your body can only lose weight so fast so by changing your plan and expectations I think you'll find success.
  • Karmc2k
    Karmc2k Posts: 98 Member
    If I were you Ellaskat I would just take the answers I liked and not visit this thread again. I really don't think anyone has been nasty to you, I think everybody is just trying hard to get you to see another viewpoint. Since you do not like many of the answers you are being given, and you already have a few you do like, why bother reading more? It only seems to get you upset.
  • Wynterbourne
    Wynterbourne Posts: 2,066 Member
    edited February 2016
    This shows a comparison of measuring vs weighing and how they can look nearly identical, but can cause a HUGE difference in calories. At least watch the video, please.

  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
    To re-iterate some points:

    1) You may be doing fine and just haven't given it enough time to see an overall trend as opposed to short-term fluctuation
    2) Body composition may have changed
    3) Measuring by cups for solids is not likely to be consistent measurement to measurement and may have altered so you are eating more than you were
    4) Daily activity likely changed somewhat given change of job, etc

    Let's assume you are losing much slower - so assume 1) is wrong. Do you think it likely that you've changed enough between points 2-4 to slow your loss?

    I do.

    Furthermore, if you've changed with 2 or more of those points, the changes could be minuscule and still have a cumulative effect. You can't do much about 2 in the short term - that's a long term problem to address - but 3 and 4 are easy fixes you can make now.
  • lcuconley
    lcuconley Posts: 734 Member
    I will offer another explanation:

    It probably isn't the scale, it's that last year you lost weight at too aggressive a rate and metabolized a lot of muscle along with the fat you burnt off.

    So, this year, although your weight is the same your BF% is higher and, since fat is practically metabolically inactive, your BMR is lower. This means that although last year your 1000-1300* was enough to yield a loss, this year it is only enough to maintain.

    /quote]

    agree with this. recommend starting weight training routine.
  • msmaireodonoghue
    msmaireodonoghue Posts: 13 Member
    Sorry what's the difference between measuring food and scales?
  • diannethegeek
    diannethegeek Posts: 14,776 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    No - you are wrong - a scale is not the issue. If it was the issue, I would not have lost weight last year. Using a scale is a thoughtless pat answer on these boards - which is why I say that.

    I lost all my weight last year without a scale, by measuring. I am doing exactly the same thing now. That is the issue I want help with - not some mindless MFP mantra of 'buy a scale'.

    I am also not trying to lose additional weight. I am trying to lose the same weight (sadly) a second time.

    Same starting weight
    Same recipes
    Same measuring system
    Same exercise amounts

    Very different results - the same methods with different/no results is what i'm looking for insight on. Why is this happening.

    I asked nicely for help - so please don't throw your nasty 'you're sloppy, don't want to hear it, etc comments at me - not the case.

    What if we show you, instead of tell you? Please, please, please watch this video, @ellaskat. It's only three minutes of your life. ;)


    I was looking for this video earlier. Thanks for posting it!
  • girlwithcurls2
    girlwithcurls2 Posts: 2,245 Member
    sllm1 wrote: »
    The truth is, if I'm not losing, I "tighten up" on what I log - which means accurately weighing, fewer restaurant meals (where I can't weigh my food), etc. That's what works for me.

    This is me too. I would respectfully suggest a food scale only because I know that while I am a pretty good judge of amounts/weights, "pretty good" sometimes changes over time. Were you really careful with your measuring? I did what someone suggested and weighed out my 1 cup of oatmeal (because I was "pretty good" at measuring, remember?) and it was 25 g over what 1 cup is supposed to weigh. It was still within an eyeball of 1 cup though!

    I restarted about 10 weeks ago, and while at first, I was just careful and mindful, I realized over a (wasted) 2 weeks that it wasn't good enough. Now I'm back to weighing and logging. And I'm back to my smaller clothes too :)

  • Char231023
    Char231023 Posts: 702 Member
    OP lets try something different how about you tells us exactly what you want to hear. So we can then repeat it back to you verbatim. Because it seems that is the only thing you want to hear. That way you can stop thinking anybody giving you sound advise is being nasty and mean to you.
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,209 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    No - you are wrong - a scale is not the issue. If it was the issue, I would not have lost weight last year. Using a scale is a thoughtless pat answer on these boards - which is why I say that.

    I lost all my weight last year without a scale, by measuring. I am doing exactly the same thing now. That is the issue I want help with - not some mindless MFP mantra of 'buy a scale'.

    I am also not trying to lose additional weight. I am trying to lose the same weight (sadly) a second time.

    Same starting weight
    Same recipes
    Same measuring system
    Same exercise amounts

    Very different results - the same methods with different/no results is what i'm looking for insight on. Why is this happening.

    I asked nicely for help - so please don't throw your nasty 'you're sloppy, don't want to hear it, etc comments at me - not the case.

    What if we show you, instead of tell you? Please, please, please watch this video, @ellaskat. It's only three minutes of your life. ;)


    I was looking for this video earlier. Thanks for posting it!

    I would have assumed you had that tucked away somewhere, @diannethegeek. You have everything! But, you're welcome. :p
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,209 Member
    Sorry what's the difference between measuring food and scales?

    Watch the video directly under your post, @msmaireodonoghue.
  • diannethegeek
    diannethegeek Posts: 14,776 Member
    Ellaskat wrote: »
    No - you are wrong - a scale is not the issue. If it was the issue, I would not have lost weight last year. Using a scale is a thoughtless pat answer on these boards - which is why I say that.

    I lost all my weight last year without a scale, by measuring. I am doing exactly the same thing now. That is the issue I want help with - not some mindless MFP mantra of 'buy a scale'.

    I am also not trying to lose additional weight. I am trying to lose the same weight (sadly) a second time.

    Same starting weight
    Same recipes
    Same measuring system
    Same exercise amounts

    Very different results - the same methods with different/no results is what i'm looking for insight on. Why is this happening.

    I asked nicely for help - so please don't throw your nasty 'you're sloppy, don't want to hear it, etc comments at me - not the case.

    What if we show you, instead of tell you? Please, please, please watch this video, @ellaskat. It's only three minutes of your life. ;)


    I was looking for this video earlier. Thanks for posting it!

    I would have assumed you had that tucked away somewhere, @diannethegeek. You have everything! But, you're welcome. :p

    It's the one commonly used food scale video I didn't have tucked away. I've got it now, though! :drinker:
  • soulofgrace
    soulofgrace Posts: 175 Member
    Sorry what's the difference between measuring food and scales?

    Watch the video below your post or the other a page back. The difference is startling.

    I used to think I was terrible at baking, and now I am starting to resent that American recipes use cups and spoon measures. All these years my measuring has been screwing up my recipes. Take, for instance, the other day when I was making pizza dough. I purposely measured my flour with a cup and then I measured it with my trusty scale. My two cups were off by at least 20 grams +/-, That's a game changing difference when it comes to the science involved in baking.

    20 grams is majorly important in the science of weight loss.